UW Today

The latest news from the UW


May 15, 2017

Where you live may impact how much you drink

    Neighborhoods with greater poverty and disorganization may play a greater role in problem drinking than the availability of bars and stores that sell hard liquor, a University of Washington-led study has found. While there is evidence for the link between neighborhood poverty and alcohol use, the new twist — that socioeconomics are more…

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May 11, 2017

UW Regents approve central campus site for Population Health building to house collaborative research and teaching

The University of Washington Board of Regents on Thursday approved the location for construction of a new building to house the UW’s Population Health Initiative.

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Suicide prevention messages are top priority for UW’s Forefront

University of Washington advocates for suicide prevention were busy pushing for legislation in Olympia, working on programs with more than a dozen local high schools and organizing the fourth annual Husky Help & Hope walk when an online TV show about suicide suddenly captivated a teenage audience. To the staff of UW-based Forefront: Innovations in…

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May 10, 2017

Arts Roundup: UW Sings, Native Art Market, Emel Mathlouthi, Photomedia Grad Exhibition, and Cherdonna Shinatra

This week in the arts, hear alumni composers play Music of Today; celebrate Native art with the Burke Museum; hear “The Voice of the Tunisian Revolution”; check out capstone Photomedia work at the Jake; and get a first look at the month-long Henry residency of Cheradonna Shinatra. MUSIC OF TODAY: UW ALUMNI COMPOSERS Friday, May 12,…

Seattle Art Museum to exhibit work by UW art professor Denzil Hurley

The Seattle Art Museum will feature work by abstract artist and UW art professor Denzil Hurley. The exhibit, titled “Disclosures,” will be on display from May 20 through November. It’s a fitting tribute, as Hurley will retire from the UW at the end of the school year.

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Kids, parents alike worried about privacy with internet-connected toys

University of Washington researchers have conducted a new study that explores the attitudes and concerns of both parents and children who play with internet-connected toys. Through a series of in-depth interviews and observations, the researchers found that kids didn’t know their toys were recording their conversations, and parents generally worried about their children’s privacy when they played with the toys.

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May 9, 2017

Shrubs, grasses planted through federal program crucial for sage grouse survival in Eastern Washington

A federal program that pays farmers to plant agricultural land with environmentally beneficial vegetation is probably the reason that sage grouse still live in portions of Washington’s Columbia Basin, according to a new study by UW, state and federal researchers.

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Early human fossils found in South African cave system

  An international team of scientists, including one from the University of Washington, has announced the discovery of additional remains of a new human species, Homo naledi, in a series of caves northwest of Johannesburg, South Africa. The find includes the remains of two adults and a child in the Lesedi Chamber of the Rising…

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May 8, 2017

Pumping up a new record: 10 million gallons of sewage diverted from Washington waters in 2016

In 2016, a record 10 million gallons of raw sewage was diverted from Puget Sound, Lake Washington and other state waterways that previously would have been dumped into vulnerable water.

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May 4, 2017

UW seismologist John Vidale elected to National Academy of Sciences

John E. Vidale, a UW professor of seismology and director of the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network, has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences.

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May 3, 2017

Arts Roundup: Harry Partch’s Oedipus, the Intersections series, Waterlines Class Series, and the Evergreen Trio

This week in the arts, see century maverick composer Harry Partch turn Sophocles’s play Oedipus into a visual and aural extravaganza; hear music inspired by great works of literature; and listen to the co-winners of the School of Music’s 2016 Strings and Piano Chamber Competition. HARRY PARTCH’S OEDIPUS: A MUSIC DANCE DRAMA May 5 – 7| Meany…

University of Washington, City of Tacoma announce Livable City Year partnership for 2017-2018

The UW’s Livable City Year program has selected the City of Tacoma as the program’s community partner for the 2017-2018 academic year.

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UW School of Social Work to host May 9 event ‘How Shifting Federal Priorities Impact the Poor’

For social service agencies, pinning down funding is par for the course. But there is heightened interest in the new administration’s priorities, and whether services to the poor will be among them. That lack of certainty — and a need to share information — prompted the University of Washington School of Social Work and the…

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May 2, 2017

New book by UW’s David R. Montgomery addresses how to rebuild Earth’s soils

“Growing a Revolution: Bringing Our Soil Back to Life,” is a good-news environment story about how shifts in farming practices can restore health and fertility to soils.

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UW Continuum College launches first-ever scholarship program for certificate students

University of Washington Continuum College has launched the first UWPCE Certificate Scholarship program to help Washington residents eager to advance their careers through education.

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Documents that Changed the World: Delayed stock market ticker tape, October 1929

Timing is everything, they say. In the latest episode of his Documents that Changed the World podcast series, Joe Janes of the UW Information School explores how an overload of critical information helped trigger the stock market crash of 1929, and thus the Great Depression. “This is a story about fortunes lost, lives ruined, a…

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Period tracking apps failing users in basic ways, study finds

A new study finds that smartphone apps to track menstrual cycles often disappoint users with a lack of accuracy, assumptions about sexual identity or partners, and an emphasis on pink and flowery form over function and customization.

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May 1, 2017

Researchers find more efficient way to make oil from dead trees

A University of Washington team has made new headway on a solution to remove beetle-killed trees from the forest and use them to make renewable transportation fuels or high-value chemicals. The researchers have refined this technique to process larger pieces of wood than ever before ― saving time and money in future commercial applications.

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April 28, 2017

New augmented reality app ‘GoHuskies’ gives UW community unique look at current and future campus

The University of Washington community has a new tool — designed as a digital scavenger hunt — to explore and learn about the existing Seattle campus as well as plans for the future.

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Class on Black Lives Matter examines ideas behind the slogan

At first, La TaSha Levy was worried her class on Black Lives Matter would be almost out of date. After all, who hasn’t seen the signs, heard the slogans, watched — or perhaps even participated in — marches to protest racism and violence against African Americans? But that was just it, realized Levy, a new…

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April 27, 2017

Arts Roundup: Orlando, Environmental Writing at the Burke, Photomedia Graduation Exhibitions, and the Brechemin Piano Series

This week in the arts, experience “one of literature’s most beloved fantasies”; attend a one-day environmental writing program in both the field and classroom; celebrate the Photomedia Graduation show at a special reception; and hear the latest installment of the Brechemin Piano Series. ORLANDO April 28-30 and May 3-7| Glenn Hughes Penthouse Theater Virginia Woolf’s Orlando…

Can early experiences with computers, robots increase STEM interest among young girls?

Girls start believing they aren’t good at math, science and even computers at a young age — but providing fun STEM activities at school and home may spark interest and inspire confidence. A study from the University of Washington’s Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences (I-LABS) finds that, when exposed to a computer-programming activity, 6-year-old…

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April 26, 2017

Invasive green crab found at Dungeness Spit

A new population of invasive European green crab has been found at Dungeness Spit, near Sequim, Washington, rekindling concern over the potential for damage to local marine life and shorelines.

Food photos help Instagram users with healthy eating

A new study describes how some people turn to posting photos on Instagram to track food intake or to be held accountable by followers in meeting healthy eating or weight loss goals.

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April 25, 2017

With autism diagnoses on the rise, UW establishes clinic for babies

To new parents, a baby’s every gurgle and glance are fascinating, from a smile at mom or dad to a reach for a colorful toy. But when a baby doesn’t look at parents and caregivers, imitate gestures and sounds, or engage in play, parents have questions. And a growing number are bringing their babies to…

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April 24, 2017

UW Law School hosts ‘How We Police in America: A Case for Reform’ May 4

Officer-involved shootings. Federal investigations. Body cameras. Civilian review boards. Black Lives Matter. Blue Lives Matter. In cities around the country, the relationship between police and community is fraught with tension — sometimes the direct result of violent incidents, sometimes the reverberations of problems elsewhere. And almost always, talk of police reform is in the air….

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Scientific discovery game significantly speeds up neuroscience research process

Mozak, a new scientific discovery game from the UW team that created Foldit, is allowing video gamers and citizen scientists to speed up a fundamental task in brain science: reconstructing the intricate architecture of brain neurons.

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Conservation not an effective tool for reducing infectious disease in people, study finds

Conservation projects that protect forests and encourage a diversity of plants and animals can provide many benefits to humans. But improved human health is not among those benefits ― at least when health is measured through the lens of infectious disease. That’s the main finding of a paper published April 24 in Philosophical Transactions of…

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Military service boosts resilience, well-being among transgender veterans

  Transgender people make up a small percentage of active-duty U.S. military personnel, but their experience in the service may yield long-term, positive effects on their mental health and quality of life. A study from the University of Washington finds that among transgender older adults, those who had served in the military reported fewer symptoms…

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April 20, 2017

Research team tracks complex web of monetary sanctions in 9 states

UW sociologist Alexes Harris leads a team of researchers at nine universities who are exploring the role of monetary sanctions in the criminal justice system. They recently completed a review of financial punishments in the laws of each of their home states. Based on their preliminary findings, the impact to a person’s pocketbook depends largely on his or her location on a map.

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Toward greener construction: UW professor leads group setting benchmarks for carbon across life of buildings

A UW-led research group has taken an important step toward measuring — and ultimately reducing — the global carbon footprint of building construction and long-term maintenance.

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UW ranks seventh in Milken Institute’s ranking of universities for technology transfer and commercialization

The University of Washington ranks seventh among national universities in a new Milken Institute report on technology transfer, “Concept to Commercialization: The Best Universities for Technology Transfer.” The report highlights the vital role research universities play in spurring economic growth.

April 19, 2017

Official notice: Housekeeping amendments to various Title 478 WAC rules

Notice of Expedited Rule Making (Per RCW 34.05.353) Title of Rule and Other Identifying Information:  Housekeeping amendments to various Title 478 WAC rules. Statutory Authority for Adoption and Statute Being Implemented:  RCW 28B.20.130. Purpose of the Proposal and Its Anticipated Effects, Including Any Changes in Existing Rules:  Housekeeping changes to Title 478 WAC rules are…

Two UW faculty named to American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Two University of Washington faculty members are among the leaders from academia, business, philanthropy, humanities and the arts elected as 2017 fellows of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, one of the nation’s oldest and most prestigious honorary societies.

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More than recess: How playing on the swings helps kids learn to cooperate

A favorite childhood pastime — swinging on the playground swing set — also may be teaching kids how to get along. The measured, synchronous movement of children on the swings can encourage preschoolers to cooperate on subsequent activities, University of Washington researchers have found. A study by the UW’s Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences…

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Proxima b discoverer to join UW astrobiologists for May 3 lecture, discussion

The lead investigator of the research team that discovered Proxima Centauri b, the closest exoplanet, will join UW astrobiologists May 3 to discuss the planet’s potential for life and even the possibility of sending spacecraft to the world.

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April 17, 2017

Remembering Ernest Henley, physicist and UW College of Arts & Sciences dean emeritus

Ernest Mark Henley, a celebrated nuclear physicist and University of Washington administrator, died on March 27, 2017, at age 92.

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New many-toothed clingfish discovered with help of digital scans

Scientists at the University of Washington, Texas A&M University and the Western Australian Museum have discovered and named a new genus and species of clingfish after stumbling upon a specimen preserved in a jar dating back to the 1970s. High-resolution scans and 3-D printing helped the researchers make their discovery.

Models, observations not so far apart on planet’s response to greenhouse gas emissions

New analysis debunks reports that recent observations are showing that Earth’s temperature responds less to greenhouse gases than predicted by climate models.

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Retreating Yukon glacier caused a river to disappear

A new study provides a postmortem on the Yukon’s Slims River, whose flow was diverted in early 2016. It is the only documented case of “river piracy” in modern times.

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