UW Today

New study shows three abrupt pulses of CO2 during last deglaciation

Increases of atmospheric carbon dioxide that helped end the last ice age more than 10,000 years ago happened in three abrupt pulses, not gradually.

Fires and floods: North Cascades federal lands prepare for climate change

UW scientists worked with managers of federal parks and forests to come up with a strategy to address warmer temperatures, increased wildfires and more flooding in the North Cascades region.

U.S. Navy awards $8 million to develop wave, tidal energy technology

The UW has an $8 million, four-year contract to develop technologies that can harness waves, tides and currents to power naval facilities worldwide.

Traditional, tea party conservatives seem split on foreign policy

Foreign policy looms large as the 2014 midterm elections approach. But traditional conservatives and their tea party counterparts may bring different concerns and motivations to the November ballot, according to a University of Washington political scientist. While traditional conservatives seem most motivated by concern over American security, Christopher Parker, UW professor of political science, suggests

UW student population grows, minority enrollment continues upward trend

Enrollment for the three University of Washington campuses increased nearly 3 percent in the new school year, according to the finalized Fall 2014 census of enrolled students released by Philip Ballinger, associate vice provost for enrollment and undergraduate admissions.

Orphanage care linked to thinner brain tissue in regions related to ADHD

Psychological studies of children who began life in Romanian orphanages shows that institutionalization is linked to physical changes in brain structure. The thinning of the cortex leaves a lasting legacy that can explain impulsivity and inattention years later.

Citizen science key to keeping pace with environmental change

Better integration of citizen science into professional science is a growing consideration at the UW and elsewhere.

Migrating animals’ pee affects ocean chemistry

Tiny animals migrating from the ocean’s surface to the sunless depths helps shape our oceans. During the daylight hours below the surface the animals release ammonia, the equivalent of our urine, that plays a significant role in marine chemistry, particularly in low-oxygen zones.

Jackson School centers receive $16 million for international education

The University of Washington’s Jackson School of International Studies has received funding from the U.S. Department of Education for all eight of its Title VI centers — with grants of more than $16 million to be awarded over four years.

UW fusion reactor concept could be cheaper than coal

University of Washington engineers have designed a concept for a fusion reactor that, when scaled up to the size of a large electrical power plant, would rival costs for a new coal-fired plant with similar electrical output.

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