What issues should a student with AD/HD consider when planning for the transition from high school to college or a career?

DO-IT Factsheet #310
http://www.washington.edu/doit/Stem/articles?310

After successfully completing high school, people with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder [1] (AD/HD) may feel that they no longer require supports to succeed. However, AD/HD can impact behavior and performance both in college and at work. College and employment present new responsibilities and new challenges; coping with AD/HD often requires a lifelong effort. Planning and preparation can smooth potentially challenging postsecondary transitions.

While exploring college options, students should keep in mind that, although all colleges that receive federal funds are required to provide reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities, not all schools or employers provide the same accommodations for people with AD/HD. For information on selecting the right college and finding help while in college consult Succeeding in College with AD/HD [2]. For more information on college transition consult Helping Students. With Disabilities. Transition to College. 21 Tips for Students With. LD and/or ADD/ADHD [3].

A student with AD/HD who is transitioning to college or a career should know his/her strengths and weaknesses, and choose a field that capitalizes on those strengths while minimizing the weaknesses. A student who is distractible will want to choose a high interest field that grabs his or her attention. Some individuals with AD/HD perform better in jobs that require physical activity.

If in doubt about an appropriate career path, students may want to take advantage of career counseling services through school or community resources. Ability test batteries available at career counseling centers can help clarify areas of interest and identify areas of academic and career strength.

For information on accommodations in employment for individuals with AD/HD consult Job Accommodations for People Who Have Attention Deficit Disorder [4].

For additional information on employment issues consult Succeeding in the Workplace with AD/HD [5].

For more information on accommodations for students, consult the DO-IT Knowledge Base article, What are typical accommodations for students with AD/HD? [6]

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