Key Elements of a Cover Letter

The cover letter is usually the first item an employer reads from you. Your letter should immediately indicate what position you are applying for and then give information that demonstrates why you should be considered for the position. Do not repeat all of the information contained in your resume. Instead, highlight or elaborate on resume items that are directly applicable to the position for which you are applying. The following information should be included in your cover letter.


Information about you

Begin your cover letter with your contact information. It should be in block style, on the left margin of your paper, towards the top.

  • Name
  • Current home address
  • Telephone number

Date

Include a date as you would do with any business letter.

Contact Person's Name, Title, Employer, and Address

Including a specific name can get your letter and resume to the hiring manager more quickly and can be an effective personal touch. If you are applying for an advertised position that does not give a name to contact, call the company and ask for the department manager's name.

Salutation

Choose the appropriate way to address the contact person.
For example:

  • Dear Mr. Johns (if a man's name is the contact)
  • Dear Ms. Smith (if a woman's name is the contact)
  • Dear Prospective Employer (if there is no contact name)
     

Opening Paragraph

In the opening paragraph tell how you learned about the position. You may, for example, know of a job through:

  • a classified advertisement
  • an unsolicited mailing
  • the Internet
  • personal referrals

 

Middle Paragraph

This paragraph gives a summary of your background and critical skills (hard skills) that make you qualified for the position.

 

Second Middle Paragraph

This paragraph can be used to demonstrate your persuasive skills (soft skills).

 

Contact Information and Closing

At the end of the letter talk about your availability for the job, where you can be contacted, and when you are going to contact the hiring person for an appointment to discuss your application. If you have no contact name you may simply want to indicate your anticipation for a response in this part of the letter. Thank the person to whom you are writing for his/her time and consideration of your application.

 


 

Other Considerations:

Paper and Printing

  • Use white or ivory (20-25 lb.), 8 ½ x 11 bond paper printed on one side only.
  • Use the same paper for resume, cover letter, and envelopes if possible.
  • Make sure that there is no shadowing or dirty marks from your printer on the papers.

 

Error Prevention

  • Follow instructions in employment ads or recruitment directions.
  • Proofread! Look for spelling and formatting errors. Make sure recipient's name, company name, and title are correctly spelled in the letter and on the envelope.
  • Proofread again!
  • Have another person proofread your letter and resume.
  • Be sure there are no errors of fact.
  • Sign in blue or black ink.
  • Keep a copy of the cover letter and resume for your records.
  • Follow up with a phone call, about five days after expected delivery.

 

Layout and Design

  • Follow standard cover letter format.
  • Keep the cover letter to one page.
  • Set margins at 1 ½”.
  • Use a simple, easy to read font style, 10-14 point. (Times, Courier, or Helvetica)
  • Use boldface, italics, all-caps and underlining, but don't overdo it.

 

Planning and Tone

  • Tailor each cover letter to one specific position.
  • Use industry jargon specific to your career field.
  • Identify the employer's key words and use them.
  • Make all statements positive. Check the tone by asking yourself if each sentence leaves a positive impression.
  • Show originality but not cuteness.
  • Use action verbs and phrases.
  • Sound determined and confident not desperate.

 

Style

  • Organize context in a reasonable and logical order.
  • Use correct grammar.
  • Keep sentences short.
  • Keep paragraphs short.
  • Use short words and simple language.
  • Make every work count.
  • Punctuate using commas, dashes, and periods.

 

Content

  • Focus on the employer's need for a worker, rather than your need for a job.
  • Tell how your skills and personal qualities match the employer's needs.
  • Focus on what you can do for the employer and how you contribute to the organization.
  • Show you have researched the company double check those facts.
  • Be specific avoid general statements.