What checklists can employers use to assess their ability to accommodate employees and customers with disabilities?

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Some organizations have developed checklists to help employers assess their ability to provide accommodations to employees and customers. Listed below are examples of checklists that employers can refer to as they develop checklists for their organizations.

The Independent Living Institute has created a checklist to help businesses and organizations assess their ability to accommodate employees and trainees with disabilities.

The Meeting Accessibility Checklist developed by the Fairfax Area Disability Services Board lists important factors to consider when planning an accessible meeting or event.

The Job Accommodation Network (JAN) maintains an ADA Title III Compliance Checklist, which talks about accessibility of public facilities and transportation.

The U.S. Department of Justice publishes a document that describes what employers need to do to make public and commercial facilities accessible to people with disabilities.

Some checklists have been developed for specific businesses or activities, such as the Self-Evaluation Checklist for Hotels and Motels and a Checklist for Inclusion (in PDF; requires the free Adobe Reader) for use by international development programs, developed by Mobility International USA (MIUSA).

Last update or review: August 26, 2010