Pre-college

What is a 504 Plan?

A 504 Plan is a plan developed to ensure that a child with a disability, identified under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, attending an elementary or secondary educational institution receives accommodations that will provide access to the learning environment.

Why is it important that students with disabilities take precollege mathematics and science courses?

Research has shown that one of the best predictors of whether or not a person will enter postsecondary education and complete a college degree has been his or her participation in math and science courses during middle and high school. In fact, participation in these types of courses has been shown to more strongly correlate with postsecondary degree completion than high school test scores or grade point averages. It has also been reported that students who take more math and science courses typically have higher SAT scores and, four years later, higher scores on the GRE.

What is the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act?

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) is the federal law that supports special education and related service programming for children and youth with disabilities. It was originally known as the Education of Handicapped Children Act, passed in 1975. In 1990, amendments to the law were passed, effectively changing the name to IDEA. In 1997 and again in 2004, additional amendments were passed to ensure equal access to education.

What is an Individualized Education Plan?

An Individualized Education Plan (or Program) is also known as an IEP. This is a plan or program developed to ensure that a child with an identified disability who is attending an elementary or secondary educational institution receives specialized instruction and related services. The IEP is developed by a team of individuals from various educational disciplines, the child with a disability, family members, and/or designated advocates.

An IEP typically includes the following:

Can students with intellectual disabilities attend college?

Yes, some students with intellectual disabilities attend college and other postsecondary programs. The ThinkCollege.net website is devoted to helping students with intellectual disabilities, parents, and advocates find postsecondary programs and resources that are a good match for these students. It includes a database of over one hundred programs that serve individuals with cognitive disabilities.

Camp Courage: A Promising Practice in Including an Accessible Technology Lab in an Existing Summer Camp

With growing concern over the low academic achievements of American youth, summer camping programs can be part of the solution while providing new, exciting experiences for their campers. Camp Courage, a residential camp in Minnesota for youth with disabilities, has developed technology-rich offerings for its campers in "Teen Camp."

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