College

Tactile Graphics: A Promising Practice for Including Accessibility Consideration into a Computer Vision Curriculum

Since 2005, Professor Richard Ladner from the University of Washington in Seattle has introduced tactile graphics to his undergraduate computer vision students. Traditional computer vision classes introduce students to image analysis and interpretation of three-dimensional information from two-dimensional image data. Traditional topics also include image segmentation, motion estimation, object recognition, and image retrieval. Dr.

DO-IT Prof: A Promising Practice in Making Postsecondary Instruction Accessible to Students with Disabilities

The DO-IT Prof project applied lessons learned by DO-IT and other researchers and practitioners nationwide to implement a comprehensive professional development program for college faculty and administrators. It was funded by the U.S. Department of Education (grant #P33A990042) and led by the DO-IT (Disabilities, Opportunities, Internetworking, and Technology) Center at the University of Washington in Seattle.

EAST's Undergraduate Research Fellowships: A Promising Practice on Access to Research Fellowships for Students with Disabilities

Undergraduate research fellowships (URFs) can have a transformative effect on students with disabilities entering science, technology, engineering, or math (STEM) fields. At the Eastern Alliance for Students with Disabilities in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics2 (EAST-2) URFs were funded opportunities for students to propose research and collaborate with faculty mentors at the University of Southern Maine (USM).

Asynchronous Instruction: A Promising Practice Using Online Access

In a study funded by the National Science Foundation's Research in Disabilities Education (RDE) program, a group of three postsecondary institutions used asynchronous online access as a universally designed method of content delivery. In addition to classroom lecture, web-based access to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) course content was also offered.

DO-IT Admin: A Promising Practice in Making Student Services Accessible to Students with Disabilities

The DO-IT Admin Model Demonstration Project applied lessons learned by project staff and other researchers and practitioners nationwide to implement a comprehensive professional development program for student services administrators. It was funded by the Office of Postsecondary Education of the U.S. Department of Education (grant #P333A020044, 2002-2006).

UW-Madison and IT Accessibility: Promising Practices for IT Support

The University of Wisconsin–Madison Division of Information Technology incorporates "access for all" early in the development process for applications that include email, electronic surveys, electronic calendars, payroll, registration, and grade requests. The IT division has committed to ensuring that web applications and pages comply with their campus web accessibility policy and the Federal Rehabilitation Act Section 508 standards.

Do all postsecondary students with disabilities use disability services?

In short, no. There are many reasons why individuals with disabilities choose not to use disability services. Some do not need accommodations (for example, a student who uses a cane for mobility but can independently climb small flights of stairs may be fully independent in her mobility on campus). Some may not want to identify themselves as having a disability. And some students may be unaware of the availability of disability services.

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