September 22, 2010

President’s annual address is Oct. 12

By pmwise

Please join me for the Annual Address to the University Community:

• Tuesday, Oct. 12, 2010
• Kane Hall, Room 130
• 3:30 p.m.–4:30 p.m.
• Reservations are not required.

The event is open to the public. After the address, please join me at a reception in the Walker Ames Room.

This year’s address will be webcast live on UWTV.org and rebroadcast on UWTV. Prior to the event, I welcome you to post questions and comments on this blog.

I look forward to seeing you there,

Image of Phyllis Wise's signature
Phyllis Wise
Interim President

5 Responses to “President’s annual address is Oct. 12”

  1. Leoule Goshu says:

    Greetings President Wise:

    I am an UW graduate student and my questions are:

    - In wake of government budget cuts, what are new revenue sources for the University of Washington to pursue to increase the endowment in a recession?

    - With Student Financial Aid, more UW students will need assistance due to the recession. With budget cuts, less funding and financial aid resources will be allocated. How can UW Financial Aid do its job with higher demand and less resources?

    - Will the UW Husky Promise remain? Is there a possibility that a Husky Promise can be developed for graduate students?

    - With the Presidential Search, have you found any interested candidates that can outdo President Emmert at fundraising?

    - Finally, what do you believe are UW’s competitive advantages and unique strengths for leveraging financial resources in the future?

    Thank you.

  2. Rajan Paranji says:

    As an employee and loyal member of UW community, I will be eager to hear from the President, if any opportunities are being explored to prepare UW to feel a ‘near zero’ impact, if a financial storm like the one the country is going through, were to revisit us in the future.

  3. Dixon Marshall Jr says:

    What opportunity will I have to negotiate with my department to seek some change on my part to save my job. I am thinking about classification reduction or reduced time to lower my cost to the department. I do not think the union that represents me is willing to negotiate in good faith on this matter. Can the administration accept proposals on my part or are they prohibited by law from accepting any individual negotiations? Thanks.

  4. David Slater says:

    Dear President Wise:

    I am entering my seventh year at UW, having completed my undergraduate degree here and currently pursuing a PhD in Electrical Engineering. In previous years, due to budgetary problems, our department has lost some of our best instructors due to their status as lecturers and adjunct faculty, as opposed to holding protected tenure positions.

    While research is the hallmark of a World Class University, I see the dissemination of knowledge through top-notch teaching as an imperative aspect of the mission of our University. Therefore, I was wondering if you would please address the following questions:

    1) Are there any plans to more actively recognize outstanding teachers in the UW community, or ways to protect such individuals from current and possible future budget cuts?

    2) Would you be willing to address the possibility of additional incentives for tenured faculty to further develop their instructional abilities?

    3) Finally, more of a comment: perhaps encouraging departments to engage in research on teaching would be a valid approach to increase institutional awareness for good teaching, while diversifying research-based income?

    I look forward to your address. Thank you,
    David Slater

  5. MarLa Kepler says:

    As a first generation, female non-traditional student, who also has native american ancestors (Cherokee, Blackfoot & Crow. I returned to school after decades of employment, raising a family, much community service and being ousted out of my hard earned socio-economic position by the recently ruled to be unconstitutional acts of past thoughtless King County council members.
    Some of those key players are now in WA. DC. helping to eliminate the middle class nationally. Finding myself stripped of assets nearly 5 years ago, I chose to mitigate my grief in the most positive way I could create- I chose to go back to school and get a fresh education to attach to my lifetime of experience. Having no family preceding generation of family follow their examples into academia and a midst the criticism of many in and out of academia my husband and children most excepted)I re-entered post High school academia. Hummnnn, “Obama wants moms to go back to school”…I do not qualify for that funding stuff – just so you know. I am a taxpayer, a lifetime Washington state resident and I had earned a 3.9 GPA (I constantly surprise even myself)when I applied to transfer to the UW. I earned my slot to study at the UW. Yet, I have sensed intentional and unintentional discouragement, withholding of opportunities and basically being “counted out”. Until I spoke with you at the community reception I was merely a sense that I worked hard to believe was prejudice/ bigotry directed my way. Thank you for being honest and so articulately validating my surmise when you stated, “Research University demographics to not support the viability of Non-traditional and disabled students”…I might state that in true empirical research.. sometimes the solutions can be found in the outliers. If researchers only looks at what they want to look at (of course it is easier to analyze) than they may miss a solution that has not yet been found. Can you explain to me and others who fit into academic categories such as those I qualify for…what you meant by that response? Those of us with visible and in my case recently diagnosed hidden disabilities which (I struggle to better manage and yet) are federally protected populations. We have much to offer and because of our life experiences we ARE able to connect the dots where others may not. Please don’t count us out before we have a chance to contribute just because “demographics say they do not support us” and because so many people prejudiciously do. If you are looking for a part of the academic community who can help “connect the dots” I would suggest that we have that capability because we have spent a life time thinking out of the box!”. I puzzle as to why after I waited so patiently until all others even those who stepped in with out waiting to speak to you tried to ignore me and leave before we had the opportunity to chat. Then why when I said, but I’ve been waiting to ask you a couple of burning questions…did you say to me.. “Ok, 30 seconds, ask your question”. I did not observe you be so dismissing with anyone else who wanted to speak with you. Perhaps, you were tired or there is some other reason for your disappointing interaction. So, I am hoping to have you think through your response this time around. Please justify to me and others in my categories why we should simply accept such dismissive responses. Sincerly & Respectfully, MarLa Kepler
    http://www.bigeye.com/donotgo.htm

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