UW Today

‘Subirdia’ author urges appreciation of birds that co-exist where we work, live, play

Surprisingly, the diversity of birds in suburban areas can be greater than in forested areas, according to John Marzluff’s new book “Welcome to Subirdia.”

‘Probiotics’ for plants boost detox abilities; untreated plants overdose and die

Scientists using a microbe that occurs naturally in eastern cottonwood trees have boosted the ability of willow and lawn grass to withstand the withering effects of the nasty industrial pollutant phenanthrene.

Global warming not just a blanket – in the long run, it’s more like tanning oil

Instead of carbon dioxide, or CO2, creating a blanket that slowly warms the planet, long-term warming happens because a darker surface and more moist air can absorb more of the incoming rays.

Undergrads use sonar to uncover Lake Union shipwrecks

Undergraduates this week were among the first people to try the latest in seafloor mapping technology — and use it to image a shipwreck on Seattle’s urban lake.

Incorporate more voices to loosen conservation gridlock, scientists urge

More diverse voices could help break a deadlock gripping the conservation community, say 238 co-signatories – including a dozen from the University of Washington.

Trout trick-or-treat: fish gobble furry animals with four feet

Freshwater fish with bellies full of shrews – one trout a few years back was found to have eaten 19 – aren’t as random as scientists have thought.

Fires and floods: North Cascades federal lands prepare for climate change

UW scientists worked with managers of federal parks and forests to come up with a strategy to address warmer temperatures, increased wildfires and more flooding in the North Cascades region.

Large X-ray scanner to produce 3-D images for labs across campus

A state-of-the-art imaging machine is coming to the University of Washington for use by researchers in a variety of disciplines.

Citizen science key to keeping pace with environmental change

Better integration of citizen science into professional science is a growing consideration at the UW and elsewhere.

Migrating animals’ pee affects ocean chemistry

Tiny animals migrating from the ocean’s surface to the sunless depths helps shape our oceans. During the daylight hours below the surface the animals release ammonia, the equivalent of our urine, that plays a significant role in marine chemistry, particularly in low-oxygen zones.

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