UW Today

Favoritism, not hostility, causes most discrimination, says UW psychology professor

Most discrimination in the U.S. is not caused by intention to harm people different from us, but by ordinary favoritism directed at helping people similar to us, according to a theoretical review published online in American Psychologist.

Video stories, other bonding exercises could help foster families connect

Researchers affiliated with the UW’s School of Social Work tailored a parenting program known to improve communication in non-foster families for use in foster families, who often say they don’t feel connected and have trouble communicating, but few resources exist that nurture their bonding.

Army drug users twice as likely to use synthetic marijuana as regular marijuana

Social work researchers from the University of Washington have found that among a group of active-duty Army personnel who use illicit drugs, the most abused substance is synthetic marijuana, nicknamed “Spice,” which is harder to detect than other drugs through standard drug tests.

Social workers can help patients recover from mild traumatic brain injuries

More than a million people are treated for mild traumatic brain injuries in U.S. hospitals and emergency rooms each year. A University of Washington researcher has found that a 20-minute conversation with a social worker has the potential to significantly reduce the functional decline of those diagnosed with a mild traumatic brain injury.

Online ‘Legislative Explorer’ uses big data to track decades of lawmaking

University of Washington political scientist John Wilkerson has matched data visualization with the study of lawmaking to create a new online tool for researchers and students called the Legislative Explorer. Think of it as big data meeting up with How a Bill Becomes a Law. “The goal was to get beyond the ‘Schoolhouse Rock’ narrative

Worker struggles, immigrant rights topic of social work series in May

The UW School of Social Work will host the series “Working Together for Labor Justice” during Labor History Month in May.

Roger Roffman chronicles society’s long struggle with pot in ‘Marijuana Nation’

Roger Roffman, UW professor emeritus of social work who has studied marijuana dependence interventions for 30 years, talks about his new book, “Marijuana Nation: One Man’s Chronicle of America Getting High: From Vietnam to Legalization.”

Metoyer to present 10th annual Samuel E. Kelly Distinguished Faculty Lecture

In her lecture “Are We There Yet? The Four Directions in Native American Higher Education,” Metoyer will talk about the historic development of Native Americans in higher education.

Babies prefer fairness – but only if it benefits them – in choosing a playmate

Babies as young as 15 months preferred people with the same ethnicity as themselves — a phenomenon known as in-group bias, or favoring people who have the same characteristics as oneself.

Science-themed music videos boost scientific literacy, study shows

As the United States puts ever-greater emphasis on science, technology, engineering and mathematics education to keep competitive in the global economy, schools are trying to figure out how to improve student learning in science. University of Washington researchers think music may be the answer for some students.

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