UW Today

Health and medicine

July 28, 2014

New protein structure could help treat Alzheimer’s, related diseases

An abnormal protein, left, is intercepted by the UW’s compound that can bind to the toxic protein and neutralize it, as shown at right.

University of Washington bioengineers have a designed a peptide structure that can stop the harmful changes of the body’s normal proteins into a state that’s linked to widespread diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and Lou Gehrig’s disease.

July 21, 2014

Sean D. Sullivan named dean of UW School of Pharmacy

Sean D. Sullivan

University of Washington President Michael K. Young and Provost Ana Mari Cauce announced Monday the selection of Sean D. Sullivan as the new dean of the UW School of Pharmacy, effective Sept. 15. The appointment is subject to approval by the UW Board of Regents. “Dr. Sullivan occupies a very prominent position nationally and internationally…

July 15, 2014

Brain responses to emotional images predict PTSD symptoms after Boston Marathon bombing

brain scan showing activation of the amygdala in the left hemisphere

By using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging scans from before the attack and survey data from after, the researchers found that heightened amygdala reaction to negative emotional stimuli was a risk factor for later developing symptoms of PTSD.

June 26, 2014

Nanopore technique rapidly decodes long DNA strands

nanopore sequencing

A low-cost technique may make DNA sequencing more convenient and less cumbersome, perhaps eventually replacing large lab machines with hand held devices.

June 23, 2014

Ferroelectric switching seen in biological tissues

An illustration of the molecular structure of tropoelastin, the smallest unit of the protein elastin.

University of Washington researchers have shown that a favorable electrical property is present in a type of protein found in organs that repeatedly stretch and retract, such as the lungs, heart and arteries. These findings are the first that clearly track this phenomenon, called ferroelectricity, occurring at the molecular level in biological tissues.

June 18, 2014

Health Sciences News Digest

News from the UW Health Sciences: Muscular dystrophy research center, UW Medicine part of a care network for Boeing employees, and a Q&A with Aaron Katz, a UW expert on health systems and policy.

June 16, 2014

Sensor in eye could track pressure changes, monitor for glaucoma

A commercially available artificial lens implanted in an eye.

University of Washington engineers have designed a low-power sensor that could be placed permanently in a person’s eye to track hard-to-measure changes in eye pressure. The sensor would be embedded with an artificial lens during cataract surgery and would detect pressure changes instantaneously, then transmit the data wirelessly using radio frequency waves.

June 12, 2014

Health Sciences News Digest

Seafaring Neolithics

News from the UW Health Sciences: Seafaring Neolithic people, communal bike programs, and high-utilizer patients

June 11, 2014

Nearly 1 in 8 American children are maltreated before age 18

black and white photo of a child

By the time they reach age 18, nearly one in eight of American children experience a confirmed case of maltreatment. Co-author Hedy Lee, a UW assistant professor of sociology, says the study shows that child maltreatment is much more common than previously thought.

June 3, 2014

UW Health Digest

catamaran boating

Recent UW health sciences news: E-health in small practices, summer safety, stopping farm worker assaults

May 28, 2014

PTSD treatment cost-effective when patients given choice

A woman sits in a dim room

A cost-analysis of post-traumatic stress disorder treatments shows that letting patients choose their course of treatment – either psychotherapy or medication – is less expensive than assigning a treatment and provides a higher quality of life for patients.

May 20, 2014

Health Sciences Digest: Alcoholism in homeless, medical phone apps, aging with chronic disability

Pensive man at bar

Designing medical apps for your phone, treating alcohol-dependent homeless individuals, and enhancing wellness in older disabled adults are some of the developments at the UW Health Sciences and UW Medicine

May 14, 2014

$31M gift will fund early stage UW research by high-tech entrepreneurs

Neil King and graduate student Yu-Ru Lin observe bacterial colony growth at the Institute for Protein Design.

The University of Washington is receiving a $31.2 million gift from Washington Research Foundation to boost entrepreneurship and support research that tackles some of society’s most crucial challenges. The award will fund four interdisciplinary initiatives that seek to advance global innovation in clean energy, protein design, big data science and neuroengineering.

May 13, 2014

Health Digest: Cutbacks jeopardize newborns, safe water, MERS facts

WIC food program

The costly effects of cutbacks on maternal/child services, assuring a pure water supply, and what you need to know about Middle East respiratory syndrome.

May 6, 2014

Health sciences digest: Drug pricing uproar, antioxidant dangers

The latest news from the UW Health Sciences and UW Medicine:   What price for a cure? The economics of drug pricing The uproar against the $1,000-a-pill hepatitis C drug Sovaldi, generic name sofosbuvir, may signal a turning point in drug pricing in the United States.  Purchasers appear to be pushing back and saying, “No.”…

Social workers can help patients recover from mild traumatic brain injuries

Two women talking.

More than a million people are treated for mild traumatic brain injuries in U.S. hospitals and emergency rooms each year. A University of Washington researcher has found that a 20-minute conversation with a social worker has the potential to significantly reduce the functional decline of those diagnosed with a mild traumatic brain injury.

April 30, 2014

Stem cell therapy regenerates heart muscle in primates

cardiac cells

Regenerative medicine researchers successfully attempted stem cell therapy to repair damaged heart muscle in non-human primates.

April 29, 2014

Health Digest: Infant immunization, worker memorial, malaria and AirCare

Airlift EKG

Health Digest is a selection of recent news and features from the UW Health Sciences/UW Medicine.

April 24, 2014

Roger Roffman chronicles society’s long struggle with pot in ‘Marijuana Nation’

Marijuana Nation-thumbnail-2ndcrop

Roger Roffman, UW professor emeritus of social work who has studied marijuana dependence interventions for 30 years, talks about his new book, “Marijuana Nation: One Man’s Chronicle of America Getting High: From Vietnam to Legalization.”

April 22, 2014

Health Digest: ‘One Health,’ OB-GYN comments, labs study ‘green’-ness

Health Digest is UW Today’s round-up of news stories from UW Health Sciences.

News digest: Burke-Gilman detours, Honor: McCarthy, provost town hall, Honors: Sutton and Loveland, Green UW

Map with detours market

Compiled by the Office of News and Information.

April 15, 2014

Health Digest: Sleep and cancer, bioethics, and lead contamination

a worker sweeps the floor of a Vietnam battery-recycling factory

Health Digest is UW Today’s round-up of news stories from UW Health Sciences, compiled by News and Information.

April 7, 2014

President Young announces Medical Education Advisory Council membership

statue of George Washington on UW campus

UW President Michael K. Young has announced the appointment of an Advisory Council on Medical Education Access and Affordability,

March 26, 2014

UW School of Medicine launches “Next Generation WWAMI” in Spokane

UW Dr. Hollie Matthews works with student David Lepez in Moses Lake in 2010.

The UW School of Medicine plans to establish Spokane as the center of an effort called “Next Generation WWAMI.”

March 21, 2014

Match Day, when medical student futures are decided

Match Day 2014 Anticipation

The official announcement of the results of the National Residency Matching Program is an annual rite of passage for UW medical students and their peers across the United States. The wait is over.

March 19, 2014

Anti-anxiety drug ameliorates autistic behaviors in mice

autistics mice

Increasing cell signals that put the brake on excitatory brain cells reduces repetitive behaviors and learning problems and improves social interactions in a mouse model of autism. This was achieved with a low dose of benzodiazipine, a common anti-anxiety, anti-seizure medication.

March 14, 2014

Distance to supermarket makes no difference to diet quality, UW study says

a refrigerator section at a grocery store containing fruit

A new UW study conducted in Seattle shows that people bypass supermarkets and ethnic stores near their homes to shop at their preferred grocery.

February 24, 2014

Healthy Generations Hartford Center of Excellence opens with lecture on changing culture of aging

A large 'W' is at the north entrance to the UW campus.

The University of Washington’s School of Social Work will launch a new center – called the Healthy Generations Hartford Center of Excellence in Geriatric Social Work – with a public lecture and reception Thursday, Feb. 27.

February 11, 2014

Data on today’s youth reveal childhood clues for later risk of STDs

condom TILE

Findings from UW longitudinal surveys of nearly 2,000 participants suggest that efforts to curb the spread of sexually transmitted diseases should begin years before most people start having sex.

February 10, 2014

Newly found tactics in offense-defense struggle with hepatitis C virus

Ram Savan lab window

People who are genetically equipped to stop hepatitis C viruses from turning off a type of interferon generally have a robust antiviral response. Findings on the mechanisms governing this ability suggest new avenues for treatment research.

February 6, 2014

Credit card-sized device could analyze biopsy, help diagnose pancreatic cancer in minutes

the device is shown up close.

University of Washington scientists and engineers are developing a low-cost device that could help pathologists diagnose pancreatic cancer earlier and faster. The prototype can perform the basic steps for processing a biopsy, relying on fluid transport instead of human hands to process the tissue.

February 4, 2014

Does caregiving cause psychological stress? Study says, it depends

elderly care giving

The results break the longstanding belief that caregiving directly causes psychological distress, and make a case for genetics and upbringing influencing vulnerability.

Personal experience, work seniority improve mental health professionals’ outlook

photo of a man looking down at his feet

One might think that after years on the job, mental health workers would harbor negative attitudes about mental illness, but a new UW study suggests the opposite.

January 29, 2014

Neanderthal lineages excavated from modern human genomes

Neanderthal Child

A fossil-free method of sequencing archaic DNA may provide insight into human evolution.

January 27, 2014

‘Achieving Health for All’ is topic of 38th Annual Faculty Lecture Feb . 6

Gloyd with grads

Dr. Stephen Gloyd, professor of global health and health services, will discuss creative responses to reducing inequity worldwide.

Facelift complications eased with help of new 3-D imaging technique

This image shows a mouse ear after a successful cosmetic filler injection. The filler, in green, rests in the tissue without blocking the blood vessels and veins

New imaging technology from University of Washington engineers allows scientists to analyze what happens within the smallest blood vessels during a cosmetic facelift. This finding could be used to prevent accidents during procedures and help clinicians reverse the ill effects if an injection doesn’t go as planned.

January 22, 2014

Gene therapy leads to robust improvements in animal model of fatal muscle disease

Childers and Bella

The experimental treatment restored muscle function and prolonged lives in animals with a condition similar to X-linked myotubular myopathy in children

January 21, 2014

Dental school researchers patent new antibacterial agent

If proven effective in clinical trials, the new antibacterial might be applied after a root canal or other dental procedure to reduce the chances of infection or decay.

Titanium-based materials can inhibit bacterial growth when bound to metal ions. If proven beneficial in clinical trials, certain titanates could be applied after a dental procedure to prevent infection or decay.

January 20, 2014

Girls frequently play soccer through concussion, study finds

girl soccer player

Serious risks are associated with continuing game play immediately after incurring a concussion, yet University of Washington researchers found that many young female soccer players do just that.

January 15, 2014

Data suggest new class of drug may be potent against genital herpes

herpes simplex virus

A new drug, called pritelivir, may offer a new treatment option for patients with genital herpes, a new industry-sponsored – study led by University of Washington researchers has found.

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