UW Today

Dissolvable fabric loaded with medicine might offer faster protection against HIV

University of Washington bioengineers have discovered a potentially faster way to deliver a topical drug that protects women from contracting HIV. Their method spins the drug into silk-like fibers that quickly dissolve when in contact with moisture, releasing higher doses of the drug than possible with other materials.

Health Sciences News Digest 7.29.2014

News from the UW Health Sciences: Alzheimer’s impact on our aging population, hunger cues, trauma treatment study, avoiding burnout, training new neuroscientists, an AIDS-free generation

New protein structure could help treat Alzheimer’s, related diseases

University of Washington bioengineers have a designed a peptide structure that can stop the harmful changes of the body’s normal proteins into a state that’s linked to widespread diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Sean D. Sullivan named dean of UW School of Pharmacy

University of Washington President Michael K. Young and Provost Ana Mari Cauce announced Monday the selection of Sean D. Sullivan as the new dean of the UW School of Pharmacy, effective Sept. 15. The appointment is subject to approval by the UW Board of Regents. “Dr. Sullivan occupies a very prominent position nationally and internationally

Brain responses to emotional images predict PTSD symptoms after Boston Marathon bombing

By using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging scans from before the attack and survey data from after, the researchers found that heightened amygdala reaction to negative emotional stimuli was a risk factor for later developing symptoms of PTSD.

Nanopore technique rapidly decodes long DNA strands

A low-cost technique may make DNA sequencing more convenient and less cumbersome, perhaps eventually replacing large lab machines with hand held devices.

Ferroelectric switching seen in biological tissues

University of Washington researchers have shown that a favorable electrical property is present in a type of protein found in organs that repeatedly stretch and retract, such as the lungs, heart and arteries. These findings are the first that clearly track this phenomenon, called ferroelectricity, occurring at the molecular level in biological tissues.

Health Sciences News Digest

News from the UW Health Sciences: Muscular dystrophy research center, UW Medicine part of a care network for Boeing employees, and a Q&A with Aaron Katz, a UW expert on health systems and policy.

Sensor in eye could track pressure changes, monitor for glaucoma

University of Washington engineers have designed a low-power sensor that could be placed permanently in a person’s eye to track hard-to-measure changes in eye pressure. The sensor would be embedded with an artificial lens during cataract surgery and would detect pressure changes instantaneously, then transmit the data wirelessly using radio frequency waves.

Health Sciences News Digest

News from the UW Health Sciences: Seafaring Neolithic people, communal bike programs, and high-utilizer patients

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