UW Today

Signalers vs. strong silent types: Sparrows exude personalities during fights

Like humans, some song sparrows are more effusive than others, at least when it comes to defending their territories. New UW findings show that consistent individual differences exist not only for how aggressive individual song sparrows are but also for how much they use their signals to communicate their aggressive intentions.

David Barash explores science, religion and meaning of life in ‘Buddhist Biology’

David Barash, a UW psychology professor, is an evolutionary biologist, unapologetic atheist, and self-described Jewbu. In his latest book, “Buddhist Biology: Ancient Eastern Wisdom Meets Modern Western Science,” Barash examines the overlap between Buddhism and biology.

A first step in learning by imitation, baby brains respond to another’s actions

Imitation may be the sincerest form of flattery for adults, but for babies it’s their foremost tool for learning. Now researchers from the University of Washington and Temple University have found the first evidence revealing a key aspect of the brain processing that occurs in babies to allow this learning by observation.

UW research: World population could be nearly 11 billion by 2100

A new United Nations analysis, using statistical methods developed at the University of Washington, shows the world population could reach nearly 11 billion by the end of the century, about 800 million more people than the previous projection issued in 2011.

Big feet preference in rural Indonesia defies one-size-fits-all theory of attractiveness

In most cultures, a woman’s small feet are seen as a sign of youth and fertility, but that’s not true of all cultures, including the Karo Batak on the island of Sumatra.

Early brain responses to words predict developmental outcomes in children with autism

The pattern of brain responses to words in 2-year-old children with autism spectrum disorder predicted the youngsters’ linguistic, cognitive and adaptive skills at ages 4 and 6, according to a new study by UW’s Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences.

New K-12 science standards add focus on practices, engineering and early learning

The recently updated K-12 science education learning goals outline a vision for what all U.S. citizens should know about science. Phillip Bell, director of UW’s Institute for Science and Math Education, talks about what’s new about the goals.

Diversity programs give illusion of corporate fairness, study shows

Diversity training programs lead people to believe that work environments are fair even when given evidence of hiring, promotion or salary inequities, according to findings by UW psychologists.

UW announces new, low-cost online-only degree completion program in early childhood studies

The UW will offer a new low-cost online bachelor’s degree completion program in early childhood and family studies. Pending final approval, the program will start in the fall.

Grieving parents find solace in remembrance photography – with photo gallery

A UW anthropology student investigated how remembrance photography helps grieving parents, and how the practice’s resurgence could signal a change in the way death and dying are dealt with in our society.

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