UW Today


March 21, 2000

Harborview program teams with FBI to help victims of bank robberies

With as many as 30 bank robberies occurring in Washington state every month, the psychological effects on tellers can be devastating. To help them cope, the Harborview Center for Sexual Assault and Traumatic Stress (HCSATS) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) began the Bank Personnel Group in early 1999, the first program of its kind in the nation.


November 22, 1999

New government funding for Harborview crash research

For decades, motor vehicle safety standards have been based on the results of tests with crash dummies. Now research being conducted at Harborview Medical Center that involves real crash victims may help to save lives and reduce injury.


November 12, 1999

New grant for UW chronic fatigue syndrome study

The University of Washington (UW) Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Cooperative Research Center, based at Harborview Medical Center, has received funding from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) to examine familial predisposition to the illness.


Alcohol counseling for trauma patients halves risk of reinjury

Routine counseling in trauma centers for those injured due to alcohol abuse can significantly reduce further excessive drinking and prevent future injuries, according to a study at Harborview Medical Center, published in the November issue of Annals of Surgery.


September 16, 1999

Breaking the worst possible news in the best possible manner

Hearing that a loved one has died after trauma could be the most emotionally devastating news one might ever hear. How this news is delivered has an immense impact on how people will later reflect on those initial moments of loss.


New study for ARDS treatment begins at Harborview

A multi-center study to help prevent acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and pneumonia among trauma patients began Sept. 1 to test the efficacy of a naturally occurring protein


Study tests vitamins in recovery from trauma

Can vitamin supplements help critically ill patients recover from their injuries? A collaborative study by Harborview surgeons and dietitians is evaluating the efficacy of anti-oxidant vitamin supplementation in intensive care unit (ICU) patients at Harborview.


September 3, 1999

Understanding serotonin receptors can speed treatment for depression

Manipulating gene expression levels in rats’ brains can help to understand the causes of clinical depression, according to psychiatric research at Harborview Medical Center.


Teens with AIDS helped by new program

New clinical research on teenagers with AIDS not only examines how quickly their immune systems recover with combination therapy, but also gives many of them the opportunity to obtain the latest treatment.


August 27, 1999

Refugee outreach program to help stem tuberculosis

Harborview, in partnership with the Seattle-King County Tuberculosis Clinic, designed an outreach program to enhance the acceptance of TB preventive therapy among Seattle area’s refugees.


Quality of death among AIDS patients depends on better communication

Dying patients all have different wishes about end-of-life care ? some fear they will lose control of their lives and that the dying process will be prolonged through technological measures, while others worry that they may lack access to such treatments.


August 26, 1999

Study links sobriety to money management among mentally ill patients

More freedom to manage their money independently can be an incentive for mentally ill substance abusers to abstain from drugs and alcohol, according to new research at Harborview Medical Center.


May 17, 1999

Intermittent hormone therapy for prostate cancer helps preserve bone mass density

It takes just nine months on male hormone suppression treatment for men with prostate cancer to lose a significant amount of bone mass density — a rate comparable to the loss experienced by post-menopausal women, according to new research conducted at the University of Washington School of Medicine.


May 14, 1999

Intermittent hormone therapy for prostate cancer helps preserve bone mass density

It takes just nine months on male hormone suppression treatment for men with prostate cancer to lose a significant amount of bone mass density — a rate comparable to the loss experienced by post-menopausal women, according to new research conducted at the University of Washington School of Medicine.