Diversity at the UW

Southeast Asian (SEA) Community, Education & Leadership Network

Southeast Asian Community, Education & Leadership Networks

Spotlight

The Washington State Commission on Asian Pacific American Affairs (CAPAA) issued a press release on July 6 to promote Mental Health Awareness in Communities of Color Month.

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Welcome to the University of Washington Southeast Asian Community, Education & Leadership Network web site. The purpose of this site is to centralize the Southeast Asian-focused resources available on the UW Seattle campus. We understand the university can be a challenging environment for those coming from Southeast Asian communities and difficult to navigate for anyone who is new to the campus.
We are excited to launch our inaugural web site to share the ongoing developments of Southeast Asian current events and relevant information. We recognize the need to provide guidance for these students to find academic, social, community and cultural support systems. This site is also dedicated to serving the needs of Southeast Asian staff, faculty and communities.

For more information, please contact Linda Ando and Chanira Reang Sperry at seaceln@uw.edu.



Muhamed Manhsour

Meet Muhamed Manhsour

Admissions Counselor, Multicultural Outreach & Recruitment

Get to know a little more about Muhamed, who recently joined the Office of Minority Affairs & Diversity Recruitment and Outreach team.

Hometown: Seattle

High School: Franklin High School

Undergraduate Degree: University of Washington; BA in Communication; Diversity and Entrepreneurship Minors

Why he is interested in this work: “I wanted this position to help the students reach their goals and to serve the underrepresented community. I believe all students should have access to higher education. In this upcoming year, I am looking forward to ensure the access and academic success of underrepresented student populations.”

What he loves most about the UW: “I love that no matter how big the campus, you definitely can find your own community. We have so many opportunities for students to grow and find themselves.”

Interesting fact: Muhamed can speak 5 languages and lived in Malaysia for a couple years.

About Muhamed: “People look at me and see an Asian face. They wonder why I have an Arabic name. This is because of my wonderful heritage. My parents are refugees. My mom is from Cambodia and my dad is from Vietnam; they are Cham. Cham are the indigenous natives of Vietnam and Cambodia and the major religions are Hinduism, Buddhism and Islam. In our case, we are Muslim Cham. I am so grateful to be in this position to help the students reach their goals and serve the underrepresented community. I believe all students should have access to higher education.”