Student and Alumni Surveys

2011 University of Washington Graduates, One Year After Graduation: Overview. D.E. McGhee and L. Kourenina, OEA Report 13-01, April 2013. (95K PDF*)

This report outlines the methodology of the survey of Year 2011 undergraduate and graduate degree recipients approximately one year post-graduation. The survey asked degree recipients about post-graduation activities and educational outcomes. The document provides links to branch, college, and department-level summary tables.

National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) 2011: Overview. D.E. McGhee, OEA Report 11-03, September 2011. (99K PDF*)

Since 2002 the Indiana University Center for Postsecondary Research has invited colleges and universities to participate in its annual survey of undergraduates in the United States and Canada. The University of Washington (Seattle; UW-S) participated that inaugural year and again biennially since 2005. This document describes the methodology of the 2011 NSSE and also serves as a compendium of several descriptive reports of UW-Seattle results. These include frequencies and means for all items, means of aggregated scales by student major, and means by survey year.

2009 University of Washington Graduates, One Year After Graduation: Overview. D.E. McGhee and L. Kourenina, OEA Report 11-01, March 2011. (82K PDF*)

This report outlines the methodology of the survey of Year 2009 undergraduate and graduate degree recipients approximately one year post-graduation. The survey asked degree recipients about post-graduation activities and educational outcomes. The document provides links to branch, college, and department-level summary tables.

National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) 2009: Overview. D.E. McGhee, OEA Report 09-05, November 2009. (100K PDF*)

Since 2002 the Indiana University Center for Postsecondary Research has invited colleges and universities to participate in its annual survey of undergraduates in the United States and Canada. The University of Washington (Seattle; UW-S) participated that inaugural year and again biennially since 2005. This document describes the methodology of the 2009 NSSE and also serves as a compendium of several descriptive reports of UW-Seattle results. These include frequencies and means for all items, means of aggregated scales by student major, and means by survey year.

University of Washington Undergraduate Degree Recipients Five and Ten Years After Graduation (2008): Frequencies and Cohort Differences. D.E. McGhee, OEA Report 09-02, April 2009. (661K PDF*)

This report summarizes the Year 2008 survey of five- and ten-year undergraduate alumni conducted by the Office of Educational Assessment. This year the survey population was 2002-03 and 1997-98 graduates. The alumni survey asked participants about their current activities, their experiences at the UW, and how they feel their UW undergraduate education has influenced their current activities. Significant differences between responses of the two cohorts of alumni are noted, where applicable.

2007 University of Washington Graduates, One Year After Graduation: Overview. D.E. McGhee and L. Kourenina, OEA Report 09-01, April 2009. (663K PDF*)

This report outlines the methodology of the survey of Year 2007 undergraduate and graduate degree recipients nine to twelve months post-graduation. The survey asked degree recipients about post-graduation activities and educational outcomes. The document provides links to several summary tables.

National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) 2007: Comparison of Response Rates by UW Campus. A. Davis-Unger and D.E. McGhee, OEA Report 07-07, October 2007. (153K PDF*)

The National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) seeks to gain a greater understanding of students' college experiences. At the three University of Washington (UW) campuses, Seattle, Bothell and Tacoma, the 2007 NSSE was administered during spring quarter via a web based questionnaire. This report summarizes the cross campus rates of response.

National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) 2007: Overview and Descriptive Statistics. A. Davis-Unger, OEA Report 07-06, November 2007. (254K PDF*)

The University of Washington (UW) took part in the 2007 National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE). The NSSE aims to gain a greater understanding of students' college experiences. These data are utilized by administrators, faculty and researchers to improve students' academic and social experience in college. This report provides a comparison between the responses of UW students and those of students participating in the Association of American Universities Data Exchange (AAUDE) consortium.

University of Washington Undergraduate Degree Recipients Five and Ten Years After Graduation (2006): Frequencies and Cohort Differences . D.E. McGhee, OEA Report 07-03, May 2007. (99K PDF*)

The Office of Educational Assessment (OEA) has administered surveys to five- and ten-year undergraduate alumni biennially since 1978. This report summarizes the Year 2006 survey of five- and ten-year undergraduate alumni conducted by the Office of Educational Assessment. This year the survey population was 2000-01 and 1995-96 graduates. The alumni survey asked participants about their current activities, their experiences at the UW, and how they feel their UW undergraduate education has impacted their current activities. Significant differences between responses of the two cohorts of alumni are noted, where applicable.

NSSE 2005: Demographics and Survey Responses by Residency and Entry Status . D.E. McGhee, OEA Report 07-02, March 2007. (213K PDF*)

This report compares responses to the 2005 NSSE among freshmen (dorm residents versus others) and seniors (native versus transfer students) .

2005 University of Washingtion Graduates One Year After Graduation: Overview. D.E. McGhee and L. Kourenina, OEA Report 07-01, March 2007. (106K PDF*)

This report outlines the methodology of the 2005-2006 survey of undergraduate and graduate degree recipients nine to twelve months post-graduation. The survey asked undergrraduate and graduate degree recipients about post-graduation activities and educational outcomes. The document provides links to several summary tables.

Senior Survey 2006: Descriptive Statistics and Gender Differences. Sebastian T. Lemire and D.E. McGhee, OEA Report 06-05, 2006. (151K PDF*)

This report documents the UW Senior Survey 2006. A brief section on the methodology of the survey precedes an overview of the results. Links to the survey instrument as well as item-by-item response frequencies and differences in responses by male and femal students are provided.

University Life and Substance Use Survey 2005. D.E. McGhee and S.T. Lemire, OEA Report 06-04, 2006. (721K PDF*)

The 2005 University Life and Substance Use Survey was administered online, and a random sample of 3,000 students who were enrolled at the UW Seattle campus during Spring Quarter 2005 were invited to participate. The intent of the survey is to solicit information on the extent to which UW students use alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs, and to determine what additional efforts the University might undertake in this important area. This report summarizes the findings, and includes comparisons by academic level (undergraduate versus graduate and professional students), respondent sex, and time.

National Study of Student Engagement (NSSE) 2005: Student-Faculty Engagement and Campus Environment. Sebastian Lemire, OEA Report 06-03, 2006. (279K PDF*)

The 2005 National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) surveyed 235,000 first-year and senior students at 528 four-year postsecondary institutions nation-wide. The stated aim of the NSSE was two-fold: to identify areas in postsecondary education that warrant particular attention and improvement; as well as to inform decision making and intervention strategies in these areas.

National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) 2005: Overview and Descriptive Statistics. Sebastian Lemire, OEA Report 06-02, 2006. (705K PDF*)

The University of Washington (UW) participated in the 2005 National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE). The stated purposes of the NSSE were to identify areas in postsecondary education that warrant particular attention and improvement, and to inform decision making and intervention strategies in these areas. The report compares responses of UW students to those of other institutions participating in the Association of American Universities Data Exchange (AAUDE) consortium.

Educational Technology Survey 2005: Overview and Descriptive Statistics. D.E. McGhee, OEA Report 06-01, 2006. (975K PDF*)

In Spring 2005 a collaborative group of University of Washington units concerned with the role of computing technologies in academics and research administered surveys to instructors and students at all three UW campuses. These surveys investigated the ways in which members of the UW community use technology in support of education. This report provides basic descriptive statistics for the student and instructor responses.

University of Washington Undergraduate Degree Recipients, Five and Ten Years After Graduation (2004): Frequencies and Cohort Comparisons. OEA Report 05-02, 2005. (37K PDF*)

In order to assess graduates' perceptions of the value of their UW education over time, all alumni who graduated in the 1998-99 and 1993-94 academic years were surveyed in Fall 2004. Alumni were asked to give self-ratings of skill levels, the perceived necessity of those skills, UW's contribution to skill development, satisfaction with skill level, and their level of preparedness for life beyond UW. Completed questionnaires were received from 1965 respondents. Frequency tables of their responses are included.

Senior Survey 2004: Descriptive Statistics and Gender Differences. D.E. McGhee, OEA Report 05-01, 2005. (46K PDF*)

This report documents the year 2004 survey of University of Washington (UW) seniors regarding their university experiences. This report describes the methodology used for the 2004 Senior Survey and provides item descriptives and differences in responses of male and female students.

2003 University of Washingtion Graduates One Year After Graduation: Methodology, Descriptives, and Gender Differences. M. Griego and L. Kourenina, OEA Report 04-02, 2004. (1.33MB PDF*)

This report outlines the methodology of a survey of 6671 undergraduate and 2787 graduate degree recipients nine to twelve months post-graduation. The survey asked undergraduate and graduate degree recipients about post-graduate activities (especially employment and continuing education activities) and educational outcomes. The document provides links to several summary tables.

Entering Student Survey, 2002: Methodology and Response Frequencies. V. Fuller, OEA Report 03-09, 2003. (30K PDF*)

This report summarizes the methodology used for the 2002 Entering Student Survey, presents tables of response frequencies, and provides comparisons between freshman and transfer students' responses.

University of Washington Undergraduate Degree Recipients, Five and Ten Years After Graduation (2002): Frequencies and Cohort Comparisons. V. Fuller, OEA Report 03-07, 2003. (42K PDF*)

This report outlines the year 2002 survey of five- and ten-year undergraduate alumni. This year's survey population consisted of 1996-97 and 1991-92 alumni. These surveys, which have been conducted annually or biennially since 1978, ask degree recipients about post-graduate activities and educational outcomes. This document provides hyperlinks to the survey instrument and to response frequency tables that include significance tests comparing the responses of the two cohorts of alumni.

2001 University of Washington Graduates, One Year After Graduation: Methodology and Response Frequencies. L. Kourenina and V. Fuller, OEA Report 03-06, 2003. (98K PDF*)

This report outlines the methodology for the survey of 2001 University of Washington (UW) graduates nine to twelve months post-graduation. These surveys, which have been conducted annually or biennially since 1978, ask undergraduate and graduate degree recipients about post-graduate activities (especially employment and continuing education activities) and educational outcomes. This year's survey also asked questions regarding the transfer process. This document provides hyperlinks to the survey instruments and to several summary tables.

The Student Survey on Educational Technology 2002: Methodology and Descriptives. D.E. McGhee, OEA Report 03-04, 2003. (109K PDF*)

During autumn quarter, 2002, Educational Partnerships and Learning Technologies convened a group of campus stakeholders and worked with the Program for Educational Transformation Through Technology (PETTT) and OEA to carry out a survey of students at the three University of Washington (UW) campuses regarding the ways in which students use, and would like to use, technology in support of their education. The ultimate aim of the survey was to improve teaching and learning at the UW by: 1) contributing to a University-wide conversation about uses of instructional technology and pedagogy in general, 2) increasing student and faculty awareness of ways in which technology can be used in service of teaching and learning, and 3) facilitating informed decision-making regarding allocation of UW resources. This report details the study methodology and provides frequency distributions and means for the closed-ended items.

Senior Survey 2002: Descriptive Statistics and Gender Differences. D.E. McGhee, OEA Report 02-10, 2002. (42K PDF*)

This report describes the methodology used for the 2002 Senior Survey and provides item descriptives and differences in responses of male and female students. In general, seniors appear to have been satisfied with their UW education: 80% indicated that they were satisfied with the quality of instruction in their major field, and 78% characterised their university experience as positive. 80% of respondents worked for pay during their junior or senior years, and women reported more hours of work than men during every year save senior year.

University of Washington University Life and Substance Use Survey, 2001. G. Garson, OEA Report 02-07, 2002. (27K PDF*)

Every two years, University of Washington (UW) students are surveyed in order to assess their use of alcohol and other drugs, their sense of community, and their attitudes about UW alcohol and drug related programs and policies. This is the sixth survey in the series, conducted in collaboration with and on behalf of the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs and the Student Affairs Committee on Alcohol and Substance Awareness (CASA). This report presents the findings of the 2001 survey, including comparisons with previous years' results.

Entering Student Survey, 2001: Methodology and Response Frequencies. G. Garson, OEA Report 02-03, 2002. (31K PDF*)

As part of a comprehensive, longitudinal study that examines student and alumni views about their education at the University of Washington (UW), the Office of Educational Assessment (OEA) periodically surveys entering UW students. These surveys seek to describe student backgrounds, assess students' aspirations at UW, and explore student perceptions of the UW community. This report summarizes the methodology used for the 2001 Entering Student Survey, provides tables of response frequencies, and presents comparisons between freshman and transfer student responses.

Senior Survey, 2001: Methodology and Response Frequencies. D.E. McGhee, OEA Report 01-05, 2001. (484K PDF*)

This report documents the Office of Educational Assessment's (OEA) 2001 survey of University of Washington (UW) seniors regarding their university experiences. The 2001 survey marks the first year that the survey was conducted completely via the Internet. Students were asked about their level of satisfaction with various facets of their UW education, the extent to which they felt the UW prepared them for post-college life, how connected they felt to the UW community, and self-perceptions of their academic skills. Also included were questions about paid employment, volunteer activities, and computer usage. This report describes the methodology used for the 2001 Senior survey and provides tables of response frequencies for all 1460 respondents, as well as comparisons of male and female student responses.

Campus Climate Survey 2000: Methodology and Preliminary Findings. D.E. McGhee and N. Lowell, OEA Report 01-01, 2000. (181K PDF*)

The present study is intended to follow up on some of the diversity-related issues previously explored in the 1999 Campus Climate Survey. The current study sampled an expanded pool, including UW alumni (n=840) in addition to current students (n=808). Overall, students reported a high level of satisfaction with their experiences at the UW. Current students generally agreed that their experiences at the UW had led to greater understanding of, and respect for, diversity. In general, minority students reported more (but still low) exposure to racism and a higher degree of interest in diversity-related matters than their majority peers. Female-male differences were similar (in direction) to minority-white differences.

1999 University of Washington Graduates, One Year After Graduation: Methodology and Response Frequencies. L. Kourenina and D.E. McGhee, OEA Report 00-07, 2000. (95K PDF*)

This Office of Educational Assessment (OEA) report outlines the methodology for the 1999 survey of University of Washington (UW) graduates, nine to twelve months post-graduation. These surveys, which have been conducted annually or biennially since 1978, ask undergraduate and graduate degree recipients about post-graduate activities (especially employment and continuing education) and educational outcomes. This year's questionnaires were very similar to those used in 1997, with the exception that several items were dropped from the undergraduate version. In addition, OEA took advantage of the growing population of Internet users and offered alumni the option to respond to Web-based versions of the surveys. The report provides hyperlinks to the survey instruments and several summary tables.

University of Washington Undergraduate Degree Recipients, Five and Ten Years After Graduation (2000): Methodology and Response Frequencies. D.E. McGhee, OEA Report 00-06, 2000. (85K PDF*)

All undergraduate alumni who graduated in the 1989-90 and 1994-95 academic years were surveyed in May, 2000. In addition to general questions about current activities, alumni were asked to rate themselves on various academic skills, the perceived necessity of those skills, UW's contribution to skill development, and satisfaction with those skills. Completed questionnaires were received from 2587 respondents. The report includes frequency tables and comparisons between five- and ten-year alumni.

Senior Survey, 2000: Methodology and Response Frequencies. D.E. McGhee, OEA Report 00-05, 2000. (90K PDF*)

This report is a first look at the Office of Educational Assessment's (OEA) annual survey of University of Washington, Seattle campus (UW) seniors regarding their university experiences. In order to make comparisons between previous senior surveys and upcoming surveys of UW alumni, the 2000 survey was expanded from the previous year to re-include items that had been left off in 1999. Students were asked about self-perceptions of their skills, their level of satisfaction with various facets of their UW education, the extent to which they felt the UW prepared them for post-college life, and how connected they felt with the UW community. The survey also included questions about paid employment, volunteer activities, and computer usage. This report describes the methodology used for the 2000 Senior survey and provides tables of response frequencies for all 556 respondents, as well as comparisons of male and female student responses.

The 1999 Entering Student Survey: Representativeness of the Respondent Sample. D.E. McGhee, OEA Report 00-04, 2000. (164K PDF*)

This report examines the representativeness of the sample of respondents to the 1999 Entering Student Survey in comparison with all Seattle campus entering undergraduates on a variety of demographic and academic variables. First-time (freshmen) and transfer students were treated as two separate populations. The sample of first-time students was found to differ significantly from its population on nine of the twelve study variables. In general, sample respondents exhibited academic achievement that was higher than the population average. The sample of transfer students was much more representative of its population: It differed only marginally on three variables.

Entering Student Survey 1999: Methodology and Response Frequencies. D.E. McGhee, OEA Report 00-03, 2000. (32K PDF*)

The Office of Educational Assessment (OEA) periodically surveys groups of students and alumni regarding their expectations of and experiences with the University of Washington (UW). The goal of these surveys is to describe student backgrounds, explore what students hope to achieve at the UW, and assess what students feel are the positive and negative aspects of UW academics and community life. Newly-enrolled undergraduates are a group of particular interest because their views may be taken as indicators of current trends. This report describes the methodology used for the 1999 Entering Student survey and provides tables of response frequencies and freshman-transfer comparisons for the 2799 respondents.

Entering Students' Educational Desires. D.E. McGhee, OEA Report 00-01, 2000. (578K PDF*)

During the summer 1998 New Student Orientation, entering students completed a survey containing 54 items related to the extent to which students desired various educational outcomes from their UW education (see OEA Report 98-4 for the complete methodology). These survey data were reduced to 10 new scales based on item intercorrelations and similarity of content. Students tended to give high desirability ratings for most of the domains, but they also discriminated among items. There were several differences by ethnicity and gender, some quite large relative to what is usually seen in this type of research.

Is Technological Literacy of Incoming Freshmen Related to Ethnicity and Family Income? G.M. Gillmore, OEA Report 99-20, 1999. (70K PDF*)

The 1999 Entering Student Survey asked incoming students about their experience with and access to personal computers. Matching data on ethnicity and family income were drawn from the University of Washington Student Database, and complete data were obtained on 1,277 students. These data indicated that nearly all new freshmen, regardless of income or ethnicity, are arriving on the UW campus with some exposure to computing in their schools and homes. However, underrepresented minorities and students of lower family incomes are less likely to be able to count on a computer in their UW residence. Having computers readily available in public campus locations appears to remain important, especially for these groups.

Campus Climate Survey 1999: Methodology and Preliminary Findings. PALIS Group, OEA Report 99-19, 1999. (211K PDF*)

Motivated by the inclusion of I-200 on the ballot, a team of researchers at the University of Washington (UW) collected data on an ethnically diverse sample of UW students (n=1015). The researchers wanted to explore the relationships among students' perceptions of campus climate, and their academic achievement and commitment to higher education. Both groups were generally satisfied with the campus climate and they reported low levels of exposure to racism. Nonetheless, small but significant differences were found among ethnic groups such that minority students, especially African Americans, were less satisfied with the campus environment and more likely to report being exposed to a racist atmosphere.

Senior Survey 1999: Methodology and Response Frequencies. D.E. McGhee, OEA Report 99-18, 1999. (34K PDF*)

The Office of Educational Assessment surveyed Seattle-campus seniors during Spring quarter 1999 regarding their opinions of their UW educational experience. The bulk of the survey items were a subset of those used in the 1998 Senior Survey and covered such topics as paid employment, satisfaction with various aspects of their UW education, volunteer activities, and computing experience. Responses were received from 610 of the 1500 randomly selected seniors. The survey methodology and response frequencies for all items are presented in this report.

Summer Orientation: Reducing the Concern and Comfort of New Students. G.M. Gillmore, OEA Report 99-14, 1999. (49K PDF*)

This study compared student responses to 31 items addressing student concerns about attending college at UW and comfort with their own academic abilities. Items were drawn from a survey administered to new students at the beginning of their Summer Orientation session, and a followup questionnaire administered several weeks later. As a result of Summer Orientation, students' concerns were significantly lowered for all items but one. The largest change was shown for the item: Whether my decision to attend UW is the right one for me, for which the average level of concern was lowered more that a full scale. Three of the five comfort items also showed a significant decrease. On average, the students felt less comfortable using a computer and doing library research for a class or own interests, and they felt less well-prepared to succeed academically at UW after Orientation. It appears that the students leave Orientation feeling that they will be able to cope with the challenges of college, but that they may not be quite as outstanding as scholars they had thought they were.

Predictors of Contribution to Society Among Graduates of the University of Washington. J.S. Korn, OEA Report 99-13, 1999. (173K PDF*)

Surveys sent to University of Washington (UW) alumni graduating in 1989. 1994, and 1997 contained seven items relating to contribution to society, service-related activities and citizenship. Report 99-10 examined and discussed the frequency with which UW alumni are currently being of service to society and in what ways. The purpose of this report is examine what are the predictors of UW alumni's contribution to society. In regard to accounting for why alumni donate time and/or money to service-related organizations/causes/activities/events, the most important predictor is whether or not the alumni have participated in philanthropy during the past year. After that, the next set of variables carrying the most predictive weight is the current demographics of the alumni. Finally, the extent to which alumni donated their time and/or money to service-related causes during college is also a significant predictor for how strongly involved alumni will be with philanthropy after college. This last finding has implications for the policies, curriculum and pedagogical practices at the University of Washington.

Ratings of Competence: From New Freshmen to Ten-Year Alumni. G.M. Gillmore, OEA Report 99-12, 1999. (224K PDF*)

Surveys were administered to six distinct student and alumni groups during 1998, from new freshmen to alumni ten years after graduation from UW. Each survey asked respondents to rate their competence on seventeen abilities. The purpose of this study was to examine differences among the six groups in their average ratings these abilities, most of which showed a significant increase in average perceived competence. A common pattern was that of growth from new student to senior, a leveling off for the first post-graduate year, and then more growth as alumni are out of UW five and ten years. It appears that UW is succeeding in building competence in students, but not uniformly on all dimensions, and perceived competence on most abilities continues to grow after college.

Contribution to Society Among Graduates of the University of Washington. J.S. Korn, OEA Report 99-10, 1999. (374K PDF*)

Surveys sent to University of Washington (UW) alumni graduating in 1989, 1994, and 1997 contained seven items relating to contribution to society, service-related activities, and citizenship. The purpose of this report is to analyze the success of the UW's promotion of good citizenship, as stated in its mission statement. The report examines how many, and in what ways, UW alumni are participating in activities that contribute to society. Over 68% of UW alumni report spending some amount of time on service-related activities and 69% report donating money to philanthropic or charitable causes, events, and/or organizations. The philanthropic activities vary widely among respondents. Over 80% of alumni (graduating 10, 5, and 1 year ago) indicate involvement (by time or money) in one or more service-related activities in the past year. Differences were discerned by time from graduation and gender. From the results of this report, it is clear that the UW is meeting its mission of producing students (current and past) who contribute to society in meaningful ways.

University of Washington Graduates, Five and Ten Years After Graduation: Representativeness of the Respondent Samples. D.E. McGhee, OEA Report 99-09, 1999. (147K PDF*)

All undergraduates who had received bachelor's degrees from the UW during the 1987-88 and 1992-93 academic years were surveyed during 1998 as part of a large evaluation of student and alumni experiences (see OEA Report 98-8 for the complete methodology). Comparisons of the two samples of respondents with their respective populations on a variety of demographic variables revealed that both samples were fairly representative. Gender, ethnicity, and UW GPA were among those variables where the respondent distributions differed from those of their respective populations. These results closely mirror those of the three other 1998 survey sample representativeness studies.

1997 University of Washington Graduates, One Year After Graduation: Representativeness of the Respondent Sample. D.E. McGhee, OEA Report 99-08, 1999. (120K PDF*)

In order to examine the representativeness of the final sample of respondents in the 1998 survey of UW graduates 1-year post-graduation (OEA Report 98-7), the 2271 respondents were compared to the entire population (n = 6346) on several demographic variables. The sample of respondents was significantly different from the entire population on seven of the fifteen study variables (gender, ethnicity, Educational Opportunity Program involvement, mean age, high school GPA, and UW GPA). All differences were generally small in magnitude. Although the sample of respondents appears to be fairly representative of the population from which it was drawn, any inferential analyses of the survey data should include examination of the possible effects of those demographic variables for which significant differences were found .

The 1998 Senior Survey: Representativeness of the Respondent Sample. D.E. McGhee, OEA Report 99-07, 1999. (72K PDF*)

In order to examine the representativeness of the final sample of respondents in the 1998 Senior Survey (OEA Report 98-5), the 611 respondents were compared to the entire population (n = 8470) on several demographic variables. Using a standard criterion, the sample of respondents was significantly different from the entire population on four of the fifteen study variables, but under a stricter criterion, only the effect for gender remained significant. All differences were generally small in magnitude. Thus, the sample of respondents for the 1998 Senior Survey appears to be fairly representative of the population from which it was drawn.

The 1998 Entering Student Survey: Representativeness of the Respondent Sample. D.E. McGhee, OEA Report 99-06, 1999. (152K PDF*)

In order to examine the representativeness of the final sample of respondents in the 1998 survey of UW entering undergraduates (OEA Report 98-4), respondents were first classified as first-time (freshman) or transfer students and then the two samples were compared to their respective populations on several demographic variables. For first-time students, the sample of respondents was significantly different from the entire population on five of the twelve study variables (ethnicity, Educational Opportunity Program involvement, athletic scholarship status, high school GPA, and SAT Verbal score). Transfer student respondents differed from the population only on Washington State Residency status. All differences were generally small in magnitude. Thus, the two samples of respondents appear to be fairly representative of their respective populations, but any subsequent inferential analyses of these data should attend to possible effects of those variables on which significant differences were detected.

Alumni Satisfaction. G.M. Gillmore, OEA Report 99-05, 1999. (449K PDF*)

Surveys sent to alumni five and ten years after graduation contained 46 items relating to satisfaction with various aspects of UW education (see OEA Report 98-8 for the specific methodology). Nine distinct scales were developed from these items based on correlational patterns and content similarity; a Global Satisfaction score was computed by averaging over all items. Alumni definitely expressed differential satisfaction, both as individuals and in relation to the content of items and scales, but the independent variables studied failed to explain much of these differences. The largest effects were generally associated with major area, but even here there were no significant differences across all items. The small but consistently higher ratings by five-year alumni may be reflective of improvement in UW programs.

Five- and Ten-Year Alumni Ratings of Competence and UW Impact. G.M. Gillmore, OEA Report 99-01, 1999. (440K PDF*)

The recent survey of five- and ten-year University of Washington alumni (OEA Report 98-8) included a set of seventeen abilities that respondents were asked to rate in terms of their own competence, the UW's impact on the development of that competence, and the importance of the ability to their current primary activity. Competence and importance were rated similarly, with alumni tending to think they were most competent at what was most important. UW impact was rated lower than importance with respect to alumni's abilities to use technology, speak effectively, undertake management responsibilities and find information. UW impact was also rated lower than competence in use of technology, working in groups and management. Implications for curricular development are discussed.

Importance of Specific Skills Five and Ten Years After Graduation. G.M. Gillmore, OEA Report 98-11, 1998. (409K PDF*)

The Office of Educational Assessment surveyed all University of Washington alumni who received their bachelor degree five years and ten years earlier (see OEA Report 98-8 for the specific methodology). Included in the survey were seventeen abilities that respondents were asked to rate in terms of importance to their current primary activity. The following variables were studied with regard to their effects on the ability ratings: years from graduation, advanced degrees, primary activity and academic major. Results underline the importance of education in general intellectual skills and argue strongly against the conceptualization of higher education as training for specific occupations.

University of Washington Undergraduate Degree Recipients, Five and Ten Years After Graduation: Methodology and Response Frequencies. OEA Assessment Group, OEA Report 98-08, 1998. (61K PDF*)

In order to assess graduates' perceptions of the value of their UW education over time, all alumni who graduated in the 1987-88 and 1992-93 academic years were surveyed in June, 1998. This survey was part of a larger study of several alumni and student groups. Thus, in addition to general questions (e.g., regarding employment and income level), several items were included that were parallel to other surveys. Alumni were asked to give self-ratings of skill levels, the perceived necessity of those skills, UW's contribution to skill development, satisfaction with skill level, and their level of preparedness for life beyond UW. Completed questionnaires were received from 3025 respondents. Frequency tables of their responses are included.

1997 University of Washington Graduates, One Year After Graduation: Methodology and Response Frequencies. OEA Assessment Group, OEA Report 98-07, 1998. (117K PDF*)

Approximately eleven months after receiving their degrees, all 1997 undergraduate and graduate/professional degree recipients were surveyed regarding their UW educational experience and their post-graduate activities. Graduate/professional degree recipients received a shorter version of the questionnaire than that sent to undergraduates, and items were modified or added as appropriate for this degree level. As part of a larger study, several items were comparable to those on surveys conducted with other student and alumni groups to allow for cross-sectional comparisons. Items included self-ratings of skills in a variety of areas and ratings of satisfaction with the UW's contribution to skill development. Responses were obtained from 2214 of the undergraduate and 1392 of the graduate/professional degree recipients.

1998 College Student Survey (CSS): Methodology and Response Frequencies. OEA Assessment Group, OEA Report 98-06, 1998. (79K PDF*)

In spring of 1998, the Cooperative Institutional Research Program (CIRP) College Student Survey (CSS) was sent to a random sample of 500 seniors. The CSS assesses students' academic and social experiences at college as well as their future goals and aspirations, and provides normative profiles of UW seniors in comparison to seniors across the nation. Some of the items on the CSS were included on the OEA Senior Survey, thereby enabling an evaluation of the validity of the OEA survey. This report gives a detailed description of the methodology employed for the 1998 administration of the CSS at the UW, and provides frequency of response as taken from the CIRP report. Also included are national comparative frequencies.

1998 Senior Survey: Methodology and Response Frequencies. OEA Assessment Group, OEA Report 98-05, 1998. (42K PDF*)

In spring of 1998, the annual OEA Senior Survey was sent to 1500 randomly selected seniors who were enrolled at the Seattle campus in Spring quarter. As part of a larger study, items were included regarding students' perceptions of the academic and the practical value of attending the UW. This allowed for comparisons between seniors and other student and alumni groups on these measures. A large segment of the questionnaire focused on students' self-reported skill level in a variety of content domains, as well as how important students perceived those domains to be, the extent to which they thought the UW impacted on the development of those skills, and how satisfied they were with said impact. Response frequencies on all items for the 638 respondents are included.

1998 Entering Student Survey: Methodology and Response Frequencies. OEA Assessment Group, OEA Report 98-04, 1998. (48K PDF*)

As part of a larger study comparing several student and alumni groups on perceived value of a UW college education, students entering the UW in Autumn quarter 1998 were asked to complete a 23-item questionnaire. Responses were obtained from 3017 freshmen and 893 transfer students attending the summer, 1998 New Student Orientation, as well 141 freshman who had not attended Orientation. The questionnaire contained items regarding student self-perceptions of skills, expectations about the UW experience, life goals, and level of comfort with the UW. Response frequencies for all items on the Entering Student Survey, as well as overlapping items from a follow-up survey are included.

State Mandated Accountability and Assessment of Student Learning at the University of Washington: Background and Rationale. J. Korn, OEA Report 98-02, 1998. (96K PDF*)

Current assessment and accountability efforts of the University of Washington (UW) and its Office of Educational Assessment (OEA) revolve around evaluating student learning. There are two equally important aims: 1) to generate information to improve the quality of education at the UW; and (2) to provide measures of student success in compliance with the Washington State Accountability Mandate. Within this report, the practical and theoretical sources used in developing the overarching project design are reviewed. Also discussed are the initial planning leading to the formulation of this project. The strategy created and adopted by the UW is complex and multi-dimensional. Both direct (Statewide Senior Writing Study) and indirect (surveys, syllabi content analysis) methods as well as quantitative and qualitative approaches were used and are delineated in this report. Specific methodologies and results for each individual portion of this collective effort are reported elsewhere (see reports 98-3 through 98-8).

The 1997 Senior Survey. G.M. Gillmore and L. Basson, OEA Report 98-1, 1998.

In the spring of 1997, the annual OEA survey of UW seniors was sent to a random sample of 1500 students who had earned 135 or more credits toward graduation and who were enrolled at the Seattle campus. A major focus of the survey was on students' evaluation of the assistance they received in pursuing their education especially academic advising. Generally, respondents expressed most use of and satisfaction with advising associated with meeting graduation requirements, and least satisfied with assistance with matters outside of the academic mainstream.

University Life and Substance Use Survey. L. Carlin, OEA Report 97-6, 1997.

This is the fourth in a series of biannual surveys of University of Washington students regarding their use of alcohol and other drugs, their sense of community, and their reactions to alcohol and other drug-related University policies and educational programs. In April of 1997 surveys were randomly sent to 3,118 students at all class levels and 1,243 were completed and returned. The study found that overall there has been little change in patterns of alcohol and other drug use among the student population since 1991.

Expectations and Realities: A Comparison of Entering and Senior Student Responses to Parallel Items. G.M. Gillmore, OEA Report 96-4, 1996.

This report compares the results of 28 parallel items on the 1995 Entering Student Questionnaire and the 1996 Senior Survey in order to address the question: To what extent do seniors' experiences at UW correspond to the new student expectations? The report found a marked tendency for new students to give more positive ratings than seniors on the same items and to expect more academic success than is likely, judging by the performance of 1994-95 graduates. The rating differences were most prominent for career-related items but also were found for socially-related items.

University Life and Substance Use Survey 1995. T. Taggart, OEA Report 96-1, 1995.

This is the third in a series of biannual surveys of University of Washington students regarding their use of alcohol and other drugs, their sense of community, and their reactions to alcohol and other drug-related University policies and educational programs. Questionnaires were sent in April 1995 to a random sample of 3,128 students at all class levels, and were returned by 1,342 (42.9%) of the students. The questionnaire was similar to two earlier studies conducted in the springs of 1991 and 1993 allowing comparisons over time. Although the patterns of alcohol consumption reported by the 1995 respondents were generally similar to those of the respondents to the 1991 and 1993 surveys, some trends were discerned.

The University of Washington Survey of Bachelor Degree Recipients: Summary of Last Four Surveys. G.M. Gillmore, OEA Research Note 96-N6, 1996. (85K PDF*)

This research note summarizes the results of the graduate survey covering undergraduate degree recipients from the 1989-90 academic year and the 1991, 1993 and 1995 calendar years. Data are provided on the alumni's primary activity, percentage of jobs in career areas, location of employment, median monthly income, and educational program status. For each of these variables, data are presented for Professional School and Arts and Sciences graduates. Mean ratings of fourteen general education and fourteen evaluative items are presented for each of the four years. All but four of these items show a trend toward more favorable ratings.

Results of the 1996 Senior Survey. G.M. Gillmore and L. Basson, OEA Research Note N-96-3, 1996.

In the spring of 1996, 533 UW seniors completed a Senior Survey. The survey focused on issues such as the impact of Volunteer Service, Service Learning Courses, Internships, Cooperative Education, research with a faculty member, and learning communities on students' educational experiences at UW. Seniors were also asked about why it takes many UW students more than four years to graduate. Finally, a number of items addressed the seniors' general educational experience at the UW and the extent to which it prepared them for the future. This research note reports the results of this survey. In general, the results indicate that most of those who participated in the special programs mentioned above found them valuable. Overall, a large majority of seniors found their University experience to be positive.

Results of the 1995 Entering Student Questionnaire. G.M. Gillmore and F.E. Hamilton, OEA Research Note N-96-2, 1996.

During summer 1995 orientation sessions, 703 entering freshmen and transfer students at the UW completed an Entering Student Questionnaire. This questionnaire emphasized student expectations about issues such as the quality of their courses, the ease of choosing and declaring a major, and future job prospects. Other topics included housing, financial support, degree expectations, and parental educational background. This research note summarizes the responses to the questionnaire. Generally, the results show the entering students to be optimistic in their expectations about what they will gain from their education and about the pleasures of campus life. Freshmen see more campus involvement for themselves and transfer students see greater ease in choosing and getting into a major but more difficulty in financing their educations.

Results of the 1995 Senior Survey. G.M. Gillmore and F.E. Hamilton, OEA Research Note N-96-1, 1996.

This report presents the results of a survey of 1294 randomly selected seniors conducted during spring quarter 1995. Responses were received from 432 students, representing 34.5% of the sample. Student responses to items relating to working, graduation time, grading, volunteer service, minors and second majors, academic planning assistance, research participation, diversity, attitudes toward instruction, coursework, and curricula, and usefulness of various student services. One interesting result of the survey was student responses to the open-ended question of what they were most satisfied with at the University of Washington and with what they were least satisfied. "Faculty" was the category that drew the largest number of responses to both questions although it received more positive mentions than negative ones.

Service and Activities Fee Committee (SAFC) Fee Allocation Survey. N. Lowell, OEA Report 95-6, 1995.

This present survey was undertaken to obtain student opinion regarding allocation of Services & Activities (S&A) Fees collected as part of the quarterly tuition of each full-time University of Washington student. Questionnaires were mailed to over 3000 randomly selected University of Washington students across all disciplines and class levels, of which 988 (31.0%) returned completed surveys. Students were asked to indicate the frequency of use and importance of currently funded programs, and to chose among various alternatives relating to the improvement and expansion of recreational facilities. Of the seven programs currently funded by S&A Fees, those used by a large number of students (50% or more) were also considered the most important.

Graduate Survey 1978-93: Education, Employment, and Unemployment. L. Basson and T. Taggart, OEA Report 95-3, 1995.

OEA has conducted annual surveys of its graduates from 1978 to 1991 and biennial surveys thereafter. Several items about employment and continuing education have remained constant over this period of time. Restricting attention to bachelor degree recipients, this study found that over the years the largest percentage of graduates were employed, with greater proportions of professional school graduates employed than Arts and Sciences graduates. The latter continued their educations in greater numbers. While the proportion of unemployed respondents has remained small, in more recent years there has been a trend toward relatively fewer jobs in career areas and greater numbers of graduates who feel themselves underemployed.

The University of Washington Graduate Survey: Differences in Learning Outcome and Evaluative Ratings by Year, Major, and Sex. G.M. Gillmore, OEA Report 95-2, 1995.

The OEA survey of graduates includes fourteen items dealing with the graduates' satisfaction with the UW's contribution to their growth in learning outcome areas and five items that evaluate aspects of their UW education. Responses to these items by bachelor degree recipients who graduated during the 1989-90 academic year and the 1991 and 1993 calendar years were analyzed to determine differences across years, by gender and by department of major. Graduates from 1993 gave significantly higher average ratings than those of prior years to ten of the nineteen items. Significant differences among departments were found in mostly predictable directions for all items but one (Learning Independently), but some departments exhibited patterns of strength across a number of items. Finally, apparent sex differences in ratings of specific items were shown to be largely an artifact of differences in the proportion of males and females who choose various majors.

Characteristics of 1994 Entering University of Washington Undergraduates. G.M. Gillmore, OEA Report 94-9, 1994.

In Summer, 1994, 828 new UW students, both freshmen and transfers were surveyed during new student orientation sessions about their expectations for the future. A strong theme running through the responses of these students was that of self-confidence. Essentially all respondents felt they would obtain a bachelor's degree, over 80% felt that they would obtain an advanced degree, and there was a marked tendency for respondents to think they were above average on a number of abilities, relative to their UW peers. UW was the first-choice institution of 75% of the respondents. The most important reasons for this choice were academic reputation, variety of course offerings, opening future employment opportunities, and relatively low cost. Finally, transfers anticipated getting less support from parents and having to work more to support their education.

The Spring, 1994, University of Washington Senior Survey. G.M. Gillmore and L. Basson, OEA Report 94-8, 1994.

A questionnaire was mailed to 1000 seniors during spring quarter and returned by 409. Generally, high satisfaction with the UW experience was reported, with instruction in the major receiving particularly high ratings. Students felt themselves most competent in skills that cut across disciplines (e. g., learning on your own, writing effectively) and least competent with regard to specific skills (e. g. understanding and appreciating the arts, using computers). Transfer students gave significantly lower ratings to aspects of the UW experience that were social in nature and were much more variable with regard to anticipated time to graduation.

University Life and Substance Use Survey: 1993 Survey. N. Lowell, OEA Report 93-5, 1997.

This is the second in a series of biannual surveys of University of Washington students regarding their use of alcohol and other drugs, their sense of community, and their reactions to alcohol and other drug-related University policies and educational programs. At the beginning of spring quarter, 1993, surveys were sent to 3448 randomly selected students at all class levels. 1595 (46.2%) completed questionnaires were returned. Results were similar to those found in 1991.

The 1991 University of Washington Survey of Graduates: The Responses of Bachelor Degree Recipients. G.M. Gillmore and L. Basson, OEA Report 93-3, 1993.

This report summarizes the results of the 1991 alumni survey, with particular emphasis on comparing students across colleges and College of Arts and Sciences subcolleges. The alumni survey also yields individualized reports for each department and college, and supplies comparative information. Included in both reports are data on job type, level, and income for working graduates and educational program of those furthering their education. The reports also include ratings of general education outcomes and general satisfaction with education within majors.

The Cooperative Institutional Research Program (CIRP) Survey of University of Washington Freshmen: 1991 Results. N. Lowell, OEA Report 92-4, 1992.

The CIRP is a nationally-administered survey of student attitudes and values, aspirations and expectations, and demographics. It was administered to a sample of 500 regularly admitted and all specially admitted new freshman during the summer of 1991. This report translated the UW and comparative data emanating from UCLA into extensive tables for presentation to the UW community. Generally, the results were very consistent with the results from the 1990 entering class.

The Winter, 1992, Survey of University of Washington Seniors. G.M. Gillmore, OEA Report 92-2, 1992.

The Faculty Council on Academic Standards sponsored a survey of 1000 randomly selected UW non-transfer seniors, 527 of whom responded. The purpose of the survey was to inform the campus community about such matters why relatively few students graduate in four years, student satisfaction with general education outcomes and advising, the impact on education of working, and general satisfaction with the UW educational program. Generally, students were satisfied with their UW experiences, had a feeling of community with the student body, and felt their educational goals were being met. Among the many intriguing results was that on average, students rated graduation requirements which take more than four years to complete and changing majors late or being late in declaring a major as the two most important reasons for an extended period of time to graduate. A strong relationship was found between living at home and working and taking longer to graduate.

University Life and Substance Use Survey. N. Lowell, OEA Report 91-4, 1991.

A random sample of 3000 currently enrolled students was surveyed at the end of winter quarter 1991, regarding their use of alcohol and other drugs, and the effectiveness of educational efforts which have been undertaken by the University in this area. Completed questionnaires were received from 1296 (43.2%) students. In general, the results of the survey suggest that a large proportion of the student population, including those under the legal age, drink alcohol, and that several factors such as age, gender, and place of residence affect level of consumption. A much smaller percentage of students use illegal drugs. Although the university community is perceived as concerned abut the extent of substance use, and many students believe that there are actions which the University could take to reduce it, most respondents stated that official university policies and programs do not affect their own use levels.

The 1989-90 University of Washington Survey of Graduates: Bachelor Degree Recipient Results. G.M. Gillmore and N. Lowell, OEA Report 91-3, 1991.

This report summarizes the results of the 1989 - 1990 academic year alumni survey, with particular emphasis on comparing the students across colleges and College of Arts and Sciences subcolleges. The alumni survey also yields individualized reports for each department and college and supplies comparative information. Included in both reports are data on job type, level, and income for working graduates and educational program of those furthering their education. The reports also include ratings of general education outcomes and general satisfaction with education within majors.

The Cooperative Institutional Research Program (CIRP) Survey of University of Washington Freshmen: 1990 Results. G.M. Gillmore and N. Lowell, OEA Report 91-2, 1991.

The CIRP is a nationally-administered survey of student attitudes and values, aspirations and expectations, and demographics. It was administered to a sample of 500 regularly admitted and all specially admitted new freshman during the summer of 1990. This report translated the UW and comparative data emanating from UCLA into extensive graphs for presentation to the UW community. An accompanying survey of use of the information indicated that it had limited impact.

Survey of Older Than Average Students at the University of Washington . N. Lowell and G.M. Gillmore, OEA Report 90-04, 1990. (5975K PDF*)

This survey was carried out to identify demographic characteristics and educational needs of older than average students at the University of Washington. Undergraduate students at least 27 years of age and graduate students at least 30 years of age were included in the study. In general, the picture of older than average students suggested is one of greater independence and diversity than the general population. They are more varied in their educational preparation and goals, their general life experiences, and in their commitment to activities and interests outside the university. Higher percentages of older students worked more than 20 hours per week and expected to be significantly in debt upon graduation. Enrollment at the University was career-related for a large number of older students, and most were returning to school after a break in enrollment averaging slightly more than seven-and-one-half years.

Survey of Older than Average Students at the University of Washington, Appendix D, Verbatim comments . N. Lowell and G.M. Gillmore, OEA Report 90-04, 1990.

Verbatim responses to open-ended questions on the Older Than Average Student Survey.

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