UW Today


April 20, 2017

Toward greener construction: UW professor leads group setting benchmarks for carbon across life of buildings

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A UW-led research group has taken an important step toward measuring — and ultimately reducing — the global carbon footprint of building construction and long-term maintenance.


April 19, 2017

Proxima b discoverer to join UW astrobiologists for May 3 lecture, discussion

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The lead investigator of the research team that discovered Proxima Centauri b, the closest exoplanet, will join UW astrobiologists May 3 to discuss the planet’s potential for life and even the possibility of sending spacecraft to the world.


April 12, 2017

Undergraduate Theater Society unleashes ‘Wolves’ April 13-23

Actors in the Undergraduate Theater Society's production of "Wolves," April 13-23 in the Cabaret Theater of Hutchinson Hall. In back, from left, are Colin Kolbus, Willy Picton and Andrew Forest; in front is Ashley Lobao.

The story of Little Red Riding Hood takes on a new dimension in the UW Undergraduate Theater Society’s new production, “Wolves,” by Steve Yockey, running April 13 to 23 in the Cabaret Theater in Hutchinson Hall.


March 31, 2017

Music played by EEG featured in DXARTS Spring Concert April 6

UW Music School Director Richard Karpen plays an electromagnetic piano called a Disklavier. Though he is shown performing on the keys, some of the music for the April 6 DXARTS Spring Concert will be played hands-free, with only the EEG.

The Disklavier is an electromagnetic piano that — like the UW-created encephalophone recently reported on by the Seattle Times — is played by brain waves alone, via an electroencephalogram. UW audiences can see and hear this new technology in “Music of Today: The DXARTS Spring Concert,” April 6, in Meany Hall.


March 28, 2017

After much media attention, UW Information School’s ‘Calling BS’ class begins

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The very name of the class, when proposed, seemed to fire imaginations nationwide and beyond. Now with the beginning of spring quarter, the UW Information School’s new course “Calling Bullshit in the Age of Big Data” is getting started.


March 23, 2017

Jackson School to offer lectures for students on ‘Trump in the World’

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Faculty with the UW Jackson School of International Studies will explore the impact of the 2016 election on their respective areas of expertise in a new two-credit class titled “Trump in the World: International Implications of the Trump Presidency.”


March 22, 2017

Race, health, justice topics for March 31 UW symposium on medical ethics

Photo by Katherine Turner.

The interdisciplinary 2017 Benjamin Rabinowitz Symposium in Medical Ethics on March 31, titled “Race, Health & Justice,” will explore inequities in health and health care and place them in political, economic and historical context.


March 13, 2017

New from author David Shields: ‘Other People: Takes & Mistakes’

"Other People: Takes & Mistakes," by UW English professor David Shields, was published by Knopf in February.

UW English professor and New York Times best-selling author David Shields has a new book out and — perhaps unsurprisingly — it’s getting excellent reviews. Shields has a couple of local book events coming up for “Other People: Takes & Mistakes.”


March 7, 2017

‘Pippin’: Dance, drama, music team for UW Musical Theater Program’s third production, March 8-19

The UW Musical Theater Program presents "Pippin" March 8-19 at the Floyd and Delores Jones Playhouse.

Director Wilson Mendieta discusses “Pippin,” the third production of the UW’s Musical Theater Program, running March 8 – 19 in the Floyd and Delores Jones Playhouse Theater.


March 3, 2017

‘Poor writing makes for poor science’: Scott Montgomery publishes new edition of popular ‘Guide to Communicating Science’

The second edition of "The Chicago Guide to Communicating Science" by Scott L. Montgomery, published in February 2017 by University of Chicago Press Books.

Scientific research that doesn’t get communicated to the public may as well not have happened at all, says Scott Montgomery in the second edition of “The Chicago Guide to Communicating Science.”


February 28, 2017

Eisenhower up, Wilson down, Roosevelts rule: UW historian Margaret O’Mara part of CSPAN 2017 presidential ranking survey

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UW historian Margaret O’Mara discusses the CSPAN 2017 Presidential Historians Survey. She participated in this ranking of the nation’s presidents in 10 categories of effectiveness.


February 22, 2017

UW astronomer Eric Agol assists in new seven-planet NASA discovery using ‘distracted driving’ technique

This artist's concept shows what the TRAPPIST-1 planetary system may look like, based on available data about the planets’ diameters, masses and distances from the host star. UW astronomer Eric Agol assisted with the big new discovery.

UW astronomy professor Eric Agol is part of the large team of researchers that has just announced confirmation of several Earth-sized, potentially habitable planets orbiting a star about 40 light-years away.


Love, parenting and murder: Undergraduate Theater Society stages ‘Medea’ from translation by UW classics professor

The Undergraduate Theater Society will present "Medea" Feb. 23 through March 5 in the Cabaret Theater of Hutchinson Hall. Shown from left are student actors Ariaga Mucek, Jordan Kerlaske (in the title role), Annika Knapp, and Anaïs Gralpois.

The UW Undergraduate Theater Society will present “Medea” Feb. 23 through March 5 in the Cabaret Theater of Hutchinson Hall, home of the School of Drama.


February 15, 2017

Early Earth as exoplanet: NASA highlights just-published UW Virtual Planetary Laboratory research

When haze built up in the atmosphere of Archean Earth, billions of years ago, the young planet might have looked like this artist's interpretation - a pale orange dot. A team of astronomers including members of the UW's Virtual Planetary Laboratory thinks the haze was self-limiting, cooling the surface by about 36 degrees Fahrenheit – not enough to cause runaway glaciation. The team’s modeling suggests that atmospheric haze might be helpful for identifying earthlike exoplanets that could be habitable.

Recently published research from the UW’s Virtual Planetary Laboratory (VPL) using ancient Earth as a stand-in for hypothetically habitable exoplanets has been highlighted by NASA in a feature article. Leading the research was Giada Arney, who was a UW astronomy doctoral student when doing the work and is now with NASA’s Goddard Spaceflight Center.


February 10, 2017

Ralina Joseph co-edits special journal issue on race, respectability and the media

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Ralina Joseph, University of Washington associate professor of communication, has guest co-edited a special triple issue of the interdisciplinary journal Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture and Society with her former mentor and dissertation adviser, Jane Rhodes of the University of Illinois at Chicago. Joseph’s own article in the issue focuses on the…


February 6, 2017

‘Overwhelming’ response, global press attention for new UW Information School course, ‘Calling BS’

It’s almost unheard-of for a university class to spark global press attention — and offers of book deals — before instruction even begins. But such is the case with the UW Information School’s new course, “Calling Bullshit in the Age of Big Data.”


January 31, 2017

Poetry, passion and social justice: Activist poets to gather at UW, perform at Seattle Public Library Feb. 3

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Poet activists from around the nation will gather for daylong UW conference Feb. 3 on creativity in activism — and then give full voice to that creativity in performances 7 – 10 p.m. at the Seattle Public Library. All are welcome.


January 17, 2017

Conditions right for complex life may have come and gone in Earth’s distant past

A 1.9-billion-year-old stromatolite — or mound made by microbes that lived shallow water — called the Gunflint Formation in northern Minnesota. The environment of the oxygen "overshoot" described in research by Michael Kipp, Eva Stüeken and Roger Buick may have included this sort of oxygen-rich setting that is suitable for complex life.

Conditions suitable to support complex life may have developed in Earth’s oceans — and then faded — more than a billion years before life truly took hold, a new University of Washington-led study has found.


Three unique pieces comprise 2017 Dance Faculty Concert Jan. 20-22

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The UW Dance Program will team with the “vertical dance company” BANDALOOP for part of its annual Dance Faculty Concert, to be held Jan. 20 – 22 in Meany Hall.


January 12, 2017

UW law professor leads group defending ‘aural tradition’ of creativity in famous ‘Blurred Lines’ copyright case

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UW School of Law professor Sean O’Connor has filed a brief in the famous “Blurred Lines” music copyright case, arguing for full composition credit for those who worked in the “aural tradition” and did not use traditional musical notation.


January 3, 2017

University of Washington-led study shows new global evidence of the role of humans, urbanization in rapid evolution

Photo by Katherine Turner.

A new multi-institution study led by the UW shows more clearly than ever that urbanization is affecting the genetic makeup of species that are crucial to ecosystem health and success.


December 21, 2016

Documents that Changed the World: Sir Ronald Fisher defines ‘statistical significance,’ 1925

Editions of Sir Ronald Fisher's 1925 work "Statistical Methods for Research Workers." Story is about an episode of Joe Janes' podcast "Documents that Changed the World"

Joe Janes’ latest Documents that Changed the World podcast is about Sir Ronald Fisher, the man who set the mark of “statistical significance” for ages afterward at 5 percent, no more no less.


December 12, 2016

Practical, personal thoughts on storytelling in Charles Johnson’s latest book, ‘The Way of the Writer’

"The Way of the Writer: Reflectioins on the Art and Craft of Storytelling," by Charles Johnson, UW professor emeritus of English, was published by Scribner.

Charles Johnson, University of Washington professor emeritus of English, discusses his latest book, “The Way of the Writer: Reflections on the Art and Craft of Storytelling.”


December 1, 2016

The many worlds of UW astronomer — and astrobiologist — Woody Sullivan

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UW astronomer and astrobiologist Woody Sullivan discusses recent work and future plans in a multifaceted career that’s changing gears, but far from winding down.


November 28, 2016

Undergraduate Theater Society takes on Shakespeare — all of it! — in fast-paced show Dec. 1-11

Actors in the UW Undergraduate Theater Society's production of "The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) [Revised]," running Dec. 1 – 11 in the Cabaret Theatre in Hutchinson Hall, home of the UW School of Drama. From left, they are Ellie Mondloch, Daphne Sage Gomez and Jake Lemberg.

The UW Undergraduate Theater Society will perform the high-energy parody “The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) [Revised],” Dec. 1-11 in the Cabaret Theatre in Hutchinson Hall.


November 14, 2016

State’s housing market strong in third quarter of 2016

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Washington state’s housing market remained strong in the third quarter of 2016, according to the UW’s Runstad Center for Real Estate Studies.


November 9, 2016

UW Libraries to hold Veterans Day open house for WWI-themed exhibit

"Washington on the Western Front: At Home and Over There" will be on display at Allen Library through Jan. 31, 2017.

UW Libraries will host an open house from 1 to 5 p.m. on Veterans Day, Friday, Nov. 11, in conjunction with the current World War I-themed exhibit, “Washington on the Western Front: At Home and Over There.”


November 4, 2016

Election 2016: What happened? Evans School to host Nov. 10 public forum reviewing ballot results

Photo by Katherine Turner.

The Evans School of Policy & Governance will look back at the 2016 election in a discussion on Nov. 10 at Parrington Hall.


November 2, 2016

Devin Naar’s book ‘Jewish Salonica’ tells of city’s transition from Ottoman Empire to Greece

"Jewish Salonica: Between the Ottoman Empire and Modern Greece" was published in September by Stanford University Press.

Prof. Devin Naar of the Jackson School and the Department of History discusses his new book, “Jewish Salonica: Between the Ottoman Empire and Modern Greece,”


October 27, 2016

Book by political scientist Victor Menaldo debunks notion of ‘resource curse’

"The Institutions Curse: National Resources, Politics, and Development," by UW political scientist Victor Menaldo.

“The Institutions Curse,” a new book by UW political scientist Victor Menaldo, finds a new explanation for the “resource curse” problem — the idea that resource-rich countries tend to be burdened with corrupt governments and underdeveloped economies.


October 25, 2016

Philosophy of immigration: Panel discussion Oct. 27 part of two-day UW conference

Photo by Katherine Turner.

A UW panel discussion Oct. 27 will look at immigration-related questions from philosophical, sociological and historical perspectives. It’s part of a two-day international conference on immigration.


October 21, 2016

Communication professor Leah Ceccarelli honored, discusses ‘rhetoric of science’

Leah Ceccarelli - story is a Q and A with her about her work, for which she was given the National Communication Association's 2016 Douglas W. Ehninger Distinguished Rhetorical Scholar Award.

Communication professor Leah Ceccarelli discusses the work that brought her the National Communication Association’s Douglas W. Ehninger Distinguished Rhetorical Scholar Award for 2016.


October 18, 2016

Documentary, archive to remember the ‘Seattle Freeway Revolt’

A tree wraps its branches around the concrete pillars of one of the ramps that weren’t built due to the freeway revolt. Minda Martin of UW Bothell is directing a documentary about the protest.

Minda Martin had not lived in Seattle long before, on a walking tour, she noticed the famously truncated “ramps to nowhere” in the Washington Park Arboretum. A filmmaker and faculty member at UW Bothell, she was fascinated — and inspired. “I was stunned by these giant freeway stumps covered in ivy along land that didn’t…


October 12, 2016

Cars vs. health: UW’s Moudon, Dannenberg contribute to Lancet series on urban planning, public health

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Automobiles — and the planning and infrastructure to support them — are making our cities sick, says an international group of researchers now publishing a three-part series in the British medical journal The Lancet.


October 5, 2016

Building ‘up not out’: Draft UW Campus Master Plan for 2018 now seeking public input

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A new proposed draft Campus Master Plan for 2018 sees the University of Washington’s Seattle campus growing up rather than out — building a little higher, filling in with more density, not expanding its borders, helping to ease transportation flow and creating big new green spaces. 2018 draft Campus Master Plan — opportunities for public…


‘A Hug from Afar’: A Sephardic family’s journey of escape as World War II looms

"A Hug from Afar: One Family's Dramatic Journey Through Three Continents to Escape the Holocaust" is by Claire Barkey Flash, with foreword by Devin Naar, UW Isaac Alhadeff Professor of Sephardic Studies and associate professor of history and Jewish studies.

Prof. Devin Naar of the Jackson School’s Stroum Center for Jewish Studies discusses the book “A Hug from Afar: One Family’s Dramatic Journey Through Three Continents to Escape the Holocaust,” by Claire Barkey Flash, for which Naar wrote the foreword.


October 4, 2016

New LGBTQ Activism in Seattle History project debuts Oct. 10

At left is Jack Starr, a successful female impersonator whose stage name was Jackie Starr -- called "the most beautiful man in America" by gossip columnist Walter Winchell. At right is Billy DeVoe. It's 1950 and they are at the Garden of Allah, Seattle's first gay-owned and operated gay bar. This story is about a new digital collection -- the LGBTQ Activism in Seattle History Project that is part of the Seattle Civil Rights and Labor History Project

The UW’s Seattle Civil Rights and Labor History Project has an important new component — the LGBTQ Activism in Seattle History Project. There will be a public launch at 7 p.m. Monday, Oct. 10, in Room 340 of the HUB.


September 30, 2016

‘We the people’: All invited to UW Constitution read-aloud event Oct. 7

An image of artist Junius Brutus Stearns' painting of George Washington signing the U.S. Constitution at the Constitutional Convention of 1787. The University of Washington will hold its annual Constitution read-aloud event on Oct. 7 at Suzzallo Library.

UW Libraries is inviting the public to Suzzallo Library at lunchtime on Oct. 7 to listen to — or participate in — the annual reading of the United States Constitution.


September 23, 2016

‘If these shackles could speak’: Charles Johnson’s powerful statement for Smithsonian Magazine feature on new African American Museum of History and Culture

Charles Johnson, UW professor emeritus of English, was asked to write a statement to accompany an item to be displayed in the new National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C. The item is an iron slave shackle from the 19th century, and the photo -- by Wendel A. White -- depicts that.

Charles Johnson, UW professor emeritus of English, wrote a statement to accompany an item to be displayed in the new National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C. What he wrote also was featured in a special issue of Smithsonian Magazine.


September 20, 2016

New film about British Holocaust trial has UW connection

Poster for the film "Denial," which is about historian Deborah Lipstadt, who taught at the University of Washington in the 1970s.

“Denial,” a new movie about an American historian’s lengthy court battle with a British Holocaust denier, has a UW connection — Deborah Lipstadt, the film’s protagonist, taught at the UW early in her career.



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