March 13, 2012

University of Washington offers admission to Fall 2012 freshman class

News and Information

The University of Washington began this week notifying applicants to the Seattle campus of their acceptance into the freshman class starting fall 2012. Notices will continue through March as the university works its way through all of the more than 26,000 applications received for a class of 6,000 entering freshman—4,000 Washington residents and 2,000 nonresidents. Last falls freshman class numbered 5,800, including 3,850 residents. This years class includes 150 more students from Washington.

“We know this is an exciting yet anxious time for many students and their families,” said Philip Ballinger, the UWs assistant vice president for enrollment and admissions. “The university has admitted a very talented and dynamic class but obviously cannot accept all those who apply.  While some outstanding students will receive disappointing news, many have made it into the class. We want them to make a decision that is good for them when it comes time to picking which institution they plan to attend. We hope, of course, it is the UW.”

Admission to the UW remains highly competitive, with last falls freshmen class average GPA at 3.75 and average SAT scores above 1800.  Data for next falls class will not be available until after the class actually enrolls in October, but indications are that scores will be even higher.

The science of admissions is based largely on past patterns of behavior. Because students apply to a number of colleges and universities, more students are offered admission than will enroll. The UW will be extending over 14,000 offers of admissions to yield the class of 6,000. Typically, for residents of the state of Washington, the UW enrolls more than 60 students from every 100 offers of admission. For students who reside in other states or countries, the UW enrolls fewer than 25 students for every 100 offers.

The UWs enrollment mix of residents and nonresidents of the state historically has heavily favored students from Washington, while also recognizing that a diverse student body includes enrolling students from other states and nations. Their perspectives contribute significantly to the learning environment, particularly as the world has become more globally connected and competitive. While this years freshman class aims for a two-thirds/one-third split between residents and nonresidents, overall the UWs percentage of resident undergraduate students hovers near 80 percent, as most community-college transfer students are Washington residents.

Non-resident students pay nearly three times what residents pay in tuition. The revenue generated from nonresidents actually helps subsidize the education of all students and enables the university to maintain its statutory commitment to enroll 4,000 residents of Washington. This has been especially critical as the state has withdrawn over fifty percent of its funding of the UW over the past four years.