Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge & The Teachings of Plants

May 11, 2023 7:30 pm

Kane Hall, Room 120

Pay What You CanAvailableRecordedComing Soon

Through personal experiences and stories shared by Robin Wall Kimmerer, we are invited to consider what we might learn if we understood plants as our teachers, from both a scientific and an indigenous perspective.

Registration opens March 13, 2023.

Standby Policy

If an event is sold out, as a courtesy, the Graduate School will offer standby seating on a first-come, first-served basis. Any reserved seats not taken by 15 minutes before the start of the lecture will be offered to our guests in the standby line. Please note: standby entrance is based on seat availability and there is no guarantee of admittance to the public lecture.

About the speaker

Robin Wall Kimmerer

Distinguished Teaching Professor, and Director, Center for Native Peoples and the Environment, SUNY ESF, MacArthur “Genius” Award Recipient

Robin Wall Kimmerer is a mother, scientist, decorated professor, and enrolled member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation. She is the author of Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants, which has earned Kimmerer wide acclaim. Her first book, Gathering Moss: A Natural and Cultural History of Mosses, was awarded the John Burroughs Medal for outstanding nature writing, and her other work has appeared in Orion, Whole Terrain, and numerous scientific journals. She tours widely and has been featured on NPR’s On Being with Krista Tippett and in 2015 addressed the general assembly of the United Nations on the topic of “Healing Our Relationship with Nature.” Kimmerer lives in Syracuse, New York, where she is a SUNY Distinguished Teaching Professor of Environmental Biology, and the founder and director of the Center for Native Peoples and the Environment, whose mission is to create programs which draw on the wisdom of both indigenous and scientific knowledge for our shared goals of sustainability. 

As a writer and a scientist, her interests in restoration include not only restoration of ecological communities, but restoration of our relationships to land. She holds a BS in Botany from SUNY ESF, an MS and PhD in Botany from the University of Wisconsin and is the author of numerous scientific papers on plant ecology, bryophyte ecology, traditional knowledge and restoration ecology. She lives on an old farm in upstate New York, tending gardens both cultivated and wild. 

Event Accessibility

The University is committed to providing access, equal opportunity, and reasonable accommodation in its services, programs, activities, education, and employment for individuals with disabilities. To request disability accommodations, contact the UW Disability Services Office at least 10 days in advance at 206-543-6450 (voice), 206-543-6452 (TTY), 206-685-7264 (fax), or dso@uw.edu.