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Lectures

Preetha Mani

Ten Theses on the Idea of Indian Literature | Preetha Mani (Rutgers University)

December 1, 2022 3:30 pm

Thompson Hall 317

FreeAvailableOpen

Lecture from Preetha Mani, Assistant Professor of South Asian Literatures, Rutgers University

Abstract

Based on my recent book, this talk compares Hindi and Tamil literature to explore the feasibility and durability of the idea of Indian literature and its capacity to collect diverse literary and linguistic strategies and aims beneath the auspices of a single rubric. Hindi and Tamil writers were active theorists who claimed the literary as the terrain on which to define and contest the postcolonial condition. Their theorizations created new forms of aesthetic affiliation between readers, writers, and texts by framing how texts should be positioned and received. The affiliations they forged were tied to the fissures of language and region yet also exceeded these fissures through the promise of readerly communion in multilingualism and translation. The unrealizability of this promise breathes life into the idea of Indian literature and its ambition to circumvent the politics of language, while linking literature to nation.

Minor Feelings: Reflections on America’s Racial Consciousness

December 1, 2022 7:30 pm

Kane Hall, Room 120

Pay What You CanAvailableRecordedOpen

Join award-winning poet and author, Cathy Park Hong who will bring her words to life as she shares personal anecdotes of her life as an Asian American. She will expands on the ideas from her book to incorporate the historical and cultural context of what it means to be a racialized other.
Shawn Wong

Katz Distinguished Lecture: How to Write a DEI Statement in Only 50 Years

December 7, 2022 7:00 pm

Kane Hall, Room 120

FreeAvailableOpen

UW Professor of English Shawn Wong has been working on his DEI (Diversity, Equity, Inclusion) statement for 50 years (38 years at the UW) and is almost finished. He began writing it when, as an undergraduate, he was told that Asian American literature did not exist, that his writing had too much style to be written by him, that his first students could not get English credit for taking his Asian American literature classes, and that large corporations could question his birthright and his ownership of intellectual property. His first book, Aiiieeeee! An Anthology of Asian American Writers, turns 50 in 2024 and it's where this DEI travel story begins.

Shawn Wong will be joined in conversation by Vice Provost and Dean of Undergraduate Academic Affairs Ed Taylor.

Christina Behtell

We Are the Medicine: Possibilities for Flourishing Through Difficult Times

December 8, 2022 4:00 pm

Livestream

FreeAvailableOpen

Learn new research and approaches for child and family well-being using a positive approach to health that fosters self, family, and community-led healing of trauma and adversity.

Viral Justice: How We Grow The World We Want

January 10, 2023 7:30 pm

Kane Hall, Room 120

Pay What You CanAvailableRecordedComing Soon

In this talk, Ruha Benjamin introduces a microvision of change -- a way of looking at the everyday ways people are working to combat unjust systems and build alternatives to the oppressive status quo. Born of a stubborn hopefulness and grounded in social analysis, she offers a pragmatic and poetic approach to fostering a more just and joyful world.

Registration opens December 13, 2022.

Democracy and the 2022 Midterm Elections, Part II

January 18, 2023 6:30 pm

Kane Hall, Room 120

Pay What You CanAvailableRecordedComing Soon

Join UW Professor Jacob Grumbach for the second and final lecture on the 2022 midterm elections. In this talk, he will address the election results as well as ways we can protect and improve American democracy through reforming the Constitution, updating election laws, and revitalizing the labor movement.

Registration opens December 13, 2022.

An Evening with Chuck D

February 9, 2023 7:30 pm

KEXP

Pay What You CanAvailableComing Soon

Join us for an exciting evening with the co-founder of the legendary rap group Public Enemy. In an interview with Seattle Central College professor, writer, and historian Daudi Abe, Chuck D will discuss culture, race, gender, communication and, of course, hip-hop.
Registration opens December 13, 2022.

Caste: Exposing America’s Invisible Scaffolding

March 3, 2023 6:30 pm

Kane Hall, Room 130

Pay What You CanAvailableRecordedComing Soon

Isabel Wilkerson captivates audiences with the universal human story of migration and reinvention. A Pulitzer Prize winner and profound storyteller, she will be discuss how Americans can move beyond destructive separations of human divisions and towards hope as a humanity.

Registration opens December 13, 2022.

Kent Monkman

TBD – Kent Monkman

April 19, 2023 7:30 pm

Kane Hall, Room 120

Pay What You CanAvailableRecordedComing Soon

TBD

Registration opens March 13, 2022.

May Day: Women and Equality

May 1, 2023 6:30 pm

Kane Hall, Room 120

Pay What You CanAvailableRecordedComing Soon

As a leading voice in the women’s movement, Ai-Jen Poo will talk about the status of today's labor movement and its impact on women.

Registration opens March 13, 2023.

Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge & The Teachings of Plants

May 11, 2023 7:30 pm

Kane Hall, Room 120

Pay What You CanAvailableRecordedComing Soon

Through personal experiences and stories shared by Robin Wall Kimmerer, we are invited to consider what we might learn if we understood plants as our teachers, from both a scientific and an indigenous perspective.

Registration opens March 13, 2023.

TBD – Tina Campt

May 16, 2023 7:30 pm

Kane Hall, Room 120

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