UW Today

This is an archived article.

May 10, 2007

UW has three new Fellows of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Three UW professors — Donald Brownlee in astronomy, Anthony Greenwald in psychology and Raymond Huey in biology — last week were named Fellows of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Brownlee’s research focuses on interplanetary dust, meteorites, comets, the origin of the solar system and astrobiology. He is widely known as the leader of the highly successful Stardust mission, a NASA project that captured material from a comet and returned it to Earth. Brownlee earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering at the University of California, Berkeley, in 1965 and a doctorate in astronomy at the UW in 1971. He joined the UW faculty in 1980.

Greenwald is the creator of the Implicit Association Tests (IAT) which measure the unconscious roots and levels of prejudice. The tests have shown that the majority of people who have taken them exhibit some form of unconscious racial, ethnic, gender or age prejudice or stereotype. He also has looked at how subliminal messages can affect human cognition and student ratings of college professors. Greenwald received his bachelor’s degree from Yale University in 1959 and his doctorate from Harvard University in 1963. He became a member of the UW faculty in 1986.

Huey’s research focuses on evolution of the physiology, behavior and ecology of insects and lizards. He currently is studying a fruit fly species introduced from Europe to the Americas in the 1970s, monitoring the speed and predictability of evolution on a continental scale and in response to climate warming. He also studies factors influencing success and death rates of Himalayan mountaineers. Huey received his bachelor’s degree from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1966 and his doctorate from Harvard University in 1975. He joined the UW faculty in 1977.

The academy was founded in 1780, and current membership includes more than 170 Nobel laureates and 50 Pulitzer Prize winners. The 227 new fellows and honorary members are scholars, scientists, artists and civic, corporate and philanthropic leaders from 27 states and 13 countries.