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Instructor Class Description

Time Schedule:

Anthony G. Greenwald
PSYCH 482
Seattle Campus

Advanced Research Methods for Behavioral Psychology

Develops skills of collecting and analyzing behavioral research data, communicating the results orally and in writing, and expressing perspectives on issues of scientific method and practice. Prerequisite: either PSYCH 315 or PSYCH 317; either PSYCH 330, PSYCH 331, PSYCH 332, or PSYCH 350. Offered: Sp.

Class description

THIS COURSE IS CO-TAUGHT WITH YUICHI SHODA.

The course is aimed at students headed toward PhD training that involves research on human behavior. It is especially appropriate for Psychology Honors students. The skills required for successful research careers are diverse, and the range of skills cultivated in this course is correspondingly diverse, including understanding of research design, mastering methods of data analysis, formulating goals of research and, effectively communicating research findings.

Student learning goals

General method of instruction

Course content is a mix of lectures on methods, readings of important contributions to method, and in-class discussion that gives students the chance to develop and express their perspectives on controversial questions of method.

Recommended preparation

Some knowledge of statistics is essential - ideally completion of Psych 317 & 318 or equivalent. It is very desirable for students to be currently engaged in developing a research project of their own, as for the Honors porgram.

Class assignments and grading

Assignments consist of (a) readings associated with topics; (b) data analysis homework assignments on 3-4 topics during the quarter; and (c)written portions of reports of an original research project that is being pursued outside this course (there will be no research projects conducted as part of the course work).

The main basis for grading is homework. Half of the grade is just for getting assignments done on time, with another 40% for quality of the work submitted, and 10% for quality of in-class contributions to discussion.


The information above is intended to be helpful in choosing courses. Because the instructor may further develop his/her plans for this course, its characteristics are subject to change without notice. In most cases, the official course syllabus will be distributed on the first day of class.
Last Update by Anthony G. Greenwald
Date: 02/18/2006