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Instructor Class Description

Time Schedule:

Philip Edward Howard
POL S 451
Seattle Campus

Communication Technology and Politics

Employs some core concepts of political communication and theories of democracy to examine the emerging role of information and communication technologies in candidate and issue campaigning; online voting; protest and advocacy movements; law-making and electronic governance in the United States and internationally. Offered: jointly with COM 407.

Class description

Student learning goals

General method of instruction

Recommended preparation

Class assignments and grading

Students will be evaluated by their degree of participation in class discussions (10%), three short papers of no more than 500 words each (30%) and a group service learning website (60%). Within this large component of the grade, a small portion will be your participation as assessed by your peers (10%), and the website itself will be assessed by an outside committee of three faculty, excluding the instructor (50%). This committee will grade the project, and the grade they assign will count towards everyoneís final grade. In other words, if the website project gets a 3.8, that will be added to the grades for participation, peer evaluation, and three short papers to make your final grade.

IF YOU ALREADY KNOW YOU DONíT LIKE GROUP PROJECTS DONíT TAKE THIS CLASS!!!

This class is a collective, service education class where the goal is to learn about how information technologies are used in political life by actively researching their use in the 2004 campaign and providing resources to journalists and the public.


The information above is intended to be helpful in choosing courses. Because the instructor may further develop his/her plans for this course, its characteristics are subject to change without notice. In most cases, the official course syllabus will be distributed on the first day of class.
http://www.polisci.washington.edu/
Last Update by Philip Edward Howard
Date: 07/27/2004