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Instructor Class Description

Time Schedule:

Mary P. Callahan
SIS 498
Seattle Campus

Readings in International Studies

Reading and discussion of selected works of major importance in interdisciplinary international studies. Restricted to majors in International Studies.

Class description

Long Distance Nationalism and the Politics of Home

This course will explore the influence of exiles, migrants, diasporas, and refugees in the political life of those left behind, as well as on the international stage. We will draw on the work by Benedict Anderson, who coined the phrase, "long distance nationalism," in an analysis of the disconnect between politics at "home" and politics in the diaspora. Our readings will include case studies of "long distance nationalism" from the 19th century to today. Geographically, we likely will cover readings from or about Tibet, Serbia, Haiti, Iraq, Ethiopia, Sri Lanka, Cuba, Turkey and others.

Student learning goals

To give students a feel for what a graduate seminar in international studies is like.

To prepare students to write graduate-level analyses of important literatures.

To provide critical feedback on students' analytical writing.

General method of instruction

This course is an intensive reading and critical thinking/writing course; as such, there will be no lectures. Every student will organize one seminar during the quarter.

Recommended preparation

Class assignments and grading

Students will be expected to read the equivalent of ten books, write nine 250-word papers, write one 700-word seminar paper,and organize at least one seminar during the quarter.

Students will complete a 2,500-word graduate-level research paper as well.

20% participation, 80% written work.

DO NOT TAKE THIS CLASS IF YOU DO NOT INTEND TO COMPLETE THE READINGS. STUDENTS WHO DO NOT COMPLETE THE READINGS ARE NOT WELCOME IN AND ARE UNLIKELY TO PASS THIS CLASS.


The information above is intended to be helpful in choosing courses. Because the instructor may further develop his/her plans for this course, its characteristics are subject to change without notice. In most cases, the official course syllabus will be distributed on the first day of class.
Last Update by Mary P. Callahan
Date: 02/15/2012