Search | Directories | Reference Tools
UW Home > Discover UW > Student Guide > Course Catalog 

Instructor Class Description

Time Schedule:

Priti Ramamurthy
SIS 333
Seattle Campus

Gender and Globalization: Theory and Process

Theoretical, historical, and empirical analysis of how current processes of globalization are transforming the actual conditions of women's lives, labor, gender ideologies, and politics in complex and contradictory ways. Topics include feminist exploration of colonialism, capitalism, economic restructuring policies, resistance in consumer and environmental movements. Offered: jointly with GWSS 333.

Class description

Theoretical, historical, and empirical analysis of how current processes of globalization are transforming the actual conditions of women's lives, labor, gender ideologies, and politics in complex and contradictory ways. Topics include feminist exploration of colonialism, capitalism, economic restructuring policies, resistance in consumer and environmental movements.

Globalization as an objective process and ideological phenomenon is currently integrating and dividing the world in unprecedented ways. In both the U.S. and the "Third World", women's labor, ideologies of gender, and their growing participation in politics are central to current processes of globalization. This course will employ feminist theories to focus on the historical precedents and the economic aspects of globalization. It will also examine the ways in which macro-structural forces and cultural discourses act recursively to change the actual conditions of women's lives, shape their resistances, and are themselves transformed in the process. On completion of this course students will develop and understanding of (i) the uneven effects of changes in the global political economy (ii) feminist scholarship and debate on global processes and (iii) current policy and activist alternatives to globalization.

Student learning goals

General method of instruction

See above.

Recommended preparation

Previous exposure to women studies and issues concerning international issues are recommended but not absolutely necessary.

Class assignments and grading

Exams will be take-homes. They will be text and lecture based and designed to encourage students to engage critically with and synthesize course materials. Assignments will be based on applying learning to quantitative and/or textual data.

Grading for the course will be as follows: Attendance, Class participation: 20% Exams: 60% Assignments: 20%


The information above is intended to be helpful in choosing courses. Because the instructor may further develop his/her plans for this course, its characteristics are subject to change without notice. In most cases, the official course syllabus will be distributed on the first day of class.
Last Update by M Jane Meyerding
Date: 10/22/2002