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Instructor Class Description

Time Schedule:

Ian N. Crispe
IMMUN 579
Seattle Campus

Research Conference in Liver Immunology

Weekly group conferences concerning ongoing graduate students and postdoctoral research immunology. Students may register for more than one conference each quarter. Prerequisite: Immunology graduate student and permission of instructor Credit/no-credit only. Offered: AWSpS.

Class description

The student will attend our weekly lab meeting, present their project or a current facet thereof, and participate actively in discussion of the issues. In such a presentation, time must be allocated appropriately between the following topics: the purpose of the research and a brief background; review of the state of the project at the previous presentation; the specific issues to be addressed at this meeting; methods currently used and results obtained, interpretation of the data so far as possible; explicit discussion of roadblocks and potential solutions.

Student learning goals

General method of instruction

The student will engage in open discussion with other students, post-docs, technical personnel, guests from outside the lab, and the PI. Over the studentís time in the laboratory, there will be a steady improvement in their ability to organize data, to use illustrations and models correctly, to formulate and understand hypotheses, to organize experiments to test hypotheses wherever possible, to interpret data using both a clear and objective eye and appropriate statistical methods, and to draw sound conclusions or recognize that they cannot be drawn. All of these aspects of research will feature in the Research Conference.

Recommended preparation

The primary reading material for this course is primary research papers that relate to critical background issues that underpin the research, specific research issues that arise during the studentís work, or core techniques that we use or plan to use. No reading list is set in advance because the relevant papers change all the time. This is supplemented with reading of reviews, which both inform the student of the state of the art in a research area, and provide a basis for critical discussion. The students are encouraged to understand a review as a personal selection and interpretation of the literature by an experienced researcher, rather than as a source of unassailable fact.

Class assignments and grading

The student will engage in open discussion with other students, post-docs, technical personnel, guests from outside the lab, and the PI. Over the studentís time in the laboratory, there will be a steady improvement in their ability to organize data, to use illustrations and models correctly, to formulate and understand hypotheses, to organize experiments to test hypotheses wherever possible, to interpret data using both a clear and objective eye and appropriate statistical methods, and to draw sound conclusions or recognize that they cannot be drawn. All of these aspects of research will feature in the Research Conference.

The studentís progress is evaluated first by the PI on an ongoing basis, second in relation to questions and critiques from other members of the laboratory. Important skills for the student to develop are the ability to listen to constructive criticism, to see the flaws where a point is misjudged, and to incorporate sound points into his or her perspective on the fly. More formal written evaluations of the students progress will be obtained (a) from the PI, in the form of a written evaluation, and (b) from the written reports of the studentís Supervisory Committee.


The information above is intended to be helpful in choosing courses. Because the instructor may further develop his/her plans for this course, its characteristics are subject to change without notice. In most cases, the official course syllabus will be distributed on the first day of class.
Last Update by Peggy A. Mccune
Date: 06/29/2012