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Instructor Class Description

Time Schedule:

Laurie J Sears
HSTAS 463
Seattle Campus

Southeast Asian History from 1800 to the Present

Post-eighteenth-century history of the present countries of Burma, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei, Indonesia, and the Philippines. Deals with colonial rule, emerging nationalism, and political independence. Investigates broad themes of social, economic, and cultural history.

Class description

Note: Although this is an Evening Degree course, day students will be allowed to register for it on the first day of the quarter. Please see a history adviser for details.

An in-depth survey of historical issues and problems in the area of Southeast Asia that includes the present-day countries of Thailand, Indonesia, and the Philippines. Begins with a brief introduction to the older history and ways of life. The body of the course deals with the post-1800 era of colonial rule, nationalist movements, gender roles, revolution and war, environmental issues, and oral and written literary traditions. The approach is by way of broad themes of social, economic, and intellectual history; political history will be connected to these powerful currents of change.

Student learning goals

General method of instruction

Recommended preparation

No prerequisites.

Class assignments and grading

Undergrads: 1. Graded exercises (2.5% each; total 10% of final grade): two maps, two quizzes. 2. Weekly in-class written comments on assigned readings and lectures (40% of grade; 5% each, week 2 to week 9). 3. In-class discussion sections (15% of grade). 4. Final take-home essay questions (35% of grade).

Grads 1. Maps and Quizzes (10% of grade) 2. Final take-home essay questions (40% of grade). 3. Research paper due in ninth week of class (40% of grade). 4. Graduate discussion in or out of class (10% of grade).


The information above is intended to be helpful in choosing courses. Because the instructor may further develop his/her plans for this course, its characteristics are subject to change without notice. In most cases, the official course syllabus will be distributed on the first day of class.
Last Update by Moran Tompkins
Date: 10/24/2002