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Instructor Class Description

Time Schedule:

Stephanie M Camp
HSTAA 302
Seattle Campus

Everyday Life in Nineteenth-Century America

Explores the history of everyday Americans (women, slaves, working people, farmers) of a variety of races, ethnicities, and citizenships in the context of the major cultural, social, and political changes that dramatically transformed their lives over the course of the nineteenth century.

Class description

In this class we study everyday Americans (women, slaves, working people, farmers) of a variety of races, ethnicities and citizenships in the context of the major cultural, social and political changes that dramatically transformed their lives over the course of the nineteenth century. Changes in forms of work, gender ideals and gender relations and citizenship will gain much of our attention.

Student learning goals

Students will understand that social categories and norms, such as those ruling gender roles, marriage or property ownership, have changed over time in the American past.

Students will see the roots of contemporary American culture, society and problems in many 19th century developments.

Students will have the opportunity to learn to distinguish between source types and to read and interpret them critically.

Students will have the opportunity to debate and discuss the readings in verbal and written forms.

General method of instruction

Lecture, reading and discussion of the reading. A moderate amount of writing to reflect more deeply on course issues through primary sources.

Recommended preparation

No prerequisites.

Class assignments and grading

Students must be willing to read carefully, to discuss the readings openly, and to write thoughtfully.

Discussion, short writing assignments, examination grades.


The information above is intended to be helpful in choosing courses. Because the instructor may further develop his/her plans for this course, its characteristics are subject to change without notice. In most cases, the official course syllabus will be distributed on the first day of class.
Last Update by Stephanie M Camp
Date: 11/07/2012