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Instructor Class Description

Time Schedule:

Colin Danby
B CUSP 176
Bothell Campus

Introduction to Global Economy

Provides intellectual frameworks for common concerns about globalization, competition, trade, transnational corporations, migration, and other contemporary questions. Emphasizes mastery of relevant data and the ability to connect data to analysis and argument. Offered: AWSp.

Class description

Introduction to Global Economy provides intellectual frameworks for common concerns about "globalization," competition, trade, transnational corporations, migration, and other contemporary questions. It emphasizes mastery of relevant data and the ability to connect data to analysis and argument, an understanding of debates, and a grasp of the variability of economic systems.

Student learning goals

General method of instruction

An essential aim of this course is the ability to link policy arguments to empirical claims about the world, and to that end almost every assignment will ask students to discuss and assess data. Some assignments will ask students to critique the way authors select or present data. A secondary aim is an understanding of how different values, different understandings of politics and economics, and different empirical claims are linked to common policy arguments about trade and migration. In the course of this work students will also gain an appreciation for certain basic magnitudes and proportions characterizing income, well-being, trade, migration, and production in the contemporary world. We will stress links between economy and politics, public health, and environment.

Recommended preparation

This is an introductory course, so there are no prerequisites.

Class assignments and grading

Expect short weekly written assignments, a midterm exam, and a final project. There may also be a final exam.

Students will be asked to read critically writings from a variety of points of view, and to look carefully and criticaly at how different people deploy data.

I would expect around ten percent of the grade to be allocated to participation, in class and via an electronic discussion board. Roughly equal percentages of the remaining grade will probably go to worksheets, to exams, and a final project.


The information above is intended to be helpful in choosing courses. Because the instructor may further develop his/her plans for this course, its characteristics are subject to change without notice. In most cases, the official course syllabus will be distributed on the first day of class.
Last Update by Colin Danby
Date: 07/18/2006