Student Ability Profiles

Student Ability Profile: Alice


Student Abilities Profile

Narrative:

Alice is a 16-year-old sophomore who comes to class on time but is rarely prepared to participate in classroom activities. She is a people person and is extremely distractible. She has an above-average I.Q. but does not follow through on assignments. She has Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD). Every item in the classroom becomes a tool, toy, or weapon. Noise is a major distraction for Alice. Working in a group and sitting close to a window or door and away from the teacher worsens the situation. She does not like quiet and creates verbal distractions.

Task/Assignment:

Actively participate in general science classroom and lab experiences, including lab manipulations and field trips.

Equipment: (lab equipment, furniture, protective clothing, chemicals, etc.)

A wide range of equipment and materials are used in the science lab. Paper, pencil, chalkboard, chalk, textbook, and occasionally manipulations are used in the classroom.

Environment: (facility, fumes, odors, dust, temperature, noise, lighting, etc.)

Classroom work is typically performed individually, and lab work is performed in pairs. The classroom tends to be quiet, and the lab is noisy.

Physical Challenges

None.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

None.

Resources

Not applicable.

Sensory Challenges

  1. Easily distracted by external visual stimuli (windows, exits, people, etc.).

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

  • Dim lights away from task at hand.
  • Close outside blinds.
  • Allow for individual work or work with a responsible partner.
  • Limit external stimulation (have only necessary items within reach during lab experiences).
  • Allow her to take exams in an area where external stimulation is limited.

Resources

  • Explore purchasing a cubicle or study area that can be used for individual work.

Cognitive Challenges

  1. Complex tasks are difficult to complete.
  2. Acts out in class.
  3. Does not complete tasks and assignments.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

  • Talk to Alice about learning conditions that work best for her, try her suggestions, and together evaluate the results.
  • Praise on-task behavior.
  • Pair with peer. Set boundaries and do not assign less work in complexity or volume.
  • Seat close to teacher, with back to window, near quieter students. Structure classroom transitions.
  • Plan for "down time."
  • Explain assignments eye to eye.
  • Praise accomplishments and good behavior.

Resources

  • Consult with school/district AD/HD specialist, IEP team member(s), and/or parents for possible suggestions to increase learning and appropriate participation.
  • Explore the AccessSTEM website at http://www.washington.edu/doit/Stem/ to find suggestions for accommodations and learning strategies.

Physical, Sensory, and Cognitive Issues and Challenges 

Physical Issues

Think of the required physical aspects of the task. What will make the environment accessible, keep the student safe and allow him/her to be an active participant? What lab equipment must be manipulated?

Physical Challenges

  1. lift / carry
  2. stamina / endurance
  3. push / pull
  4. kneel / squat
  5. reach
  6. repetitive tasks
  7. fine motor: pinch / grasp
  8. fine motor: manipulate / maneuver
  9. gross motor
  10. sit in chair
  11. walk / stand
  12. balance
  13. bend / twist
  14. stoop / crouch
  15. other

Sensory Issues

Think of room temperature, noise, fumes, dust, odors, and allergies. Also consider the ability to speak and/or communicate, and the visual aspects of the task or assignment.

Sensory Issues

  1. vision
  2. hearing
  3. touch
  4. smell
  5. taste
  6. oral communication
  7. temperature
  8. fumes
  9. external stimuli
  10. lighting
  11. other

Cognitive Issues

Is the assignment done with a group, partner or individually? What memory and communication skills are needed? What is the level of complexity of the task.

Cognitive Challenges

  1. short term memory
  2. long term memory
  3. task complexity
  4. reading
  5. writing
  6. spelling
  7. string of numbers (math)
  8. paying attention
  9. visual, auditory, or kinesthetic learner.
  10. self-esteem / advocacy issues
  11. behavior issues / acting out
  12. other

Student Ability Profile: Rebecca


Student Abilities Profile 

Narrative:

Rebecca is a 15-year-old freshman. She has a condition that affects both motor and cognitive skills. She uses a wheelchair. Rebecca is very personable. It takes Rebecca a long time to grasp even simple concepts. Auditory input works best, but instructions may need to be repeated several times. She is most successful when labs are slow-paced and have few steps. She also needs assistance with manipulatives.

Task/Assignment:

Actively participate in science classroom and lab experiences, including field trips.

Equipment: (lab equipment, furniture, protective clothing, chemicals, etc.)

A wide range of equipment and materials are used in the science classroom and lab.

Environment: (facility, fumes, odors, dust, temperature, noise, lighting, etc.)

Lab activities are often performed in groups. Field trips to science facilities and museums are taken periodically.

Physical Challenges

  1. Difficulty with repetitive tasks.
  2. Difficulty pinching and grasping.
  3. Difficulty walking and standing.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

  • Provide hand-over-hand guidance.
  • Provide a "grabber" device and surgical gloves to increase teacher and/or therapist.
  • Avoid small manipulatives.
  • Provide a work station that is wheelchair-accessible.
  • Reduce length of assignments/tasks.
  • Provide lab equipment with easy-to-grasp handles.
  • Pair with a lab partner.
  • Arrange wheelchair-accessible transportation.

Resources

  • Obtain curriculum suggestions from special education
  • Get information on lift-equipped vans from district.
  • Get information on accessible lab furniture and equipment from local vendor; request purchases as needed.
  • Purchase word recognition software or other adaptive technology.
  • Talk with the student about accommodations.
  • Explore AccessSTEM site at http://www.washington.edu/doit/Stem/ for information on accommodation and adaptive equipment.

Sensory Challenges

None.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

None.

Resources

Not applicable.

Cognitive Challenges

  1. Limited short-term memory.
  2. Limited long-term memory.
  3. Difficulty with complex tasks.
  4. Reading limitations.
  5. Writing limitations.
  6. Poor spelling skills.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

  • Talk to Rebecca about learning conditions that are best for her, try her suggestions, and together evaluate the results.
  • Provide tape-recorded texts and other written materials.
  • Remind Rebecca of assignments periodically.
  • Allow extra time for testing.
  • Break assignments into small, linear steps.
  • Speak slowly and distinctly.

Resources

Physical, Sensory, and Cognitive Issues and Challenges 

Physical Issues

Think of the required physical aspects of the task. What will make the environment accessible, keep the student safe and allow him/her to be an active participant? What lab equipment must be manipulated?

Physical Challenges

  1. lift / carry
  2. stamina / endurance
  3. push / pull
  4. kneel / squat
  5. reach
  6. repetitive tasks
  7. fine motor: pinch / grasp
  8. fine motor: manipulate / maneuver
  9. gross motor
  10. sit in chair
  11. walk / stand
  12. balance
  13. bend / twist
  14. stoop / crouch
  15. other

Sensory Issues

Think of room temperature, noise, fumes, dust, odors, and allergies. Also consider the ability to speak and/or communicate, and the visual aspects of the task or assignment.

Sensory Issues

  1. vision
  2. hearing
  3. touch
  4. smell
  5. taste
  6. oral communication
  7. temperature
  8. fumes
  9. external stimuli
  10. lighting
  11. other

Cognitive Issues

Is the assignment done with a group, partner or individually? What memory and communication skills are needed? What is the level of complexity of the task.

Cognitive Challenges

  1. short term memory
  2. long term memory
  3. task complexity
  4. reading
  5. writing
  6. spelling
  7. string of numbers (math)
  8. paying attention
  9. visual, auditory, or kinesthetic learner.
  10. self-esteem / advocacy issues
  11. behavior issues / acting out
  12. other

Student Ability Profile: William


Student Abilities Profile 

Narrative:

William is an 18-year-old senior who has Tourette's Syndrome. He exhibits frequent and inappropriate loud verbalizations during class, especially when in stressful situations. William is an athlete. He is 6' 3" tall and weighs over 200 pounds. His presence can be intimidating to others. He is being medicated for his condition. He can be manipulative and may use his disability to avoid work. William's outbursts may affect the entire classroom atmosphere, but his peers tolerate his outbursts and tend to cover for him.

Task/Assignment:

Complete mathematics activities in an algebra class.

Equipment: (lab equipment, furniture, protective clothing, chemicals, etc.)

Textbook, paper, pencils, chalkboards, and chalk are the primary pieces of equipment for this class. Occasionally, 3-D manipulatives are used.

Environment: (facility, fumes, odors, dust, temperature, noise, lighting, etc.)

Math assignments are completed individually and in groups.

Physical Challenges

  1. Frequent verbal outbursts.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

  • When reasonable, ignore outbursts and avoid singling him out.
  • Invite William to explain Tourette's Syndrome to the class, with your assistance as appropriate.
  • Reduce stressful situations as much as possible.

Resources

  • Obtain curriculum suggestions from special education teacher and/or therapist.
  • Talk with the student about accommodations.
  • Explore AccessSTEM site at http://www.washington.edu/doit/Stem/ for information on accommodation and adaptive equipment.

Sensory Challenges

None.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

None.

Resources

Not applicable.

Cognitive Challenges

  1. Easily distracted.
  2. Difficulty paying attention.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

  • Talk to William about learning conditions that work best for him, try his suggestions, and together evaluate the results.
  • Hold William's attention when instructing the class.
  • Repeat instructions directly to him.
  • Avoid group work that is distracting to William.
  • On some group assignments, it may be best for William to work in a quiet area.
  • Allow him to take exams in a quiet location with a proctor.

Resources

Physical, Sensory, and Cognitive Issues and Challenges 

Physical Issues

Think of the required physical aspects of the task. What will make the environment accessible, keep the student safe and allow him/her to be an active participant? What lab equipment must be manipulated?

Physical Challenges

  1. lift / carry
  2. stamina / endurance
  3. push / pull
  4. kneel / squat
  5. reach
  6. repetitive tasks
  7. fine motor: pinch / grasp
  8. fine motor: manipulate / maneuver
  9. gross motor
  10. sit in chair
  11. walk / stand
  12. balance
  13. bend / twist
  14. stoop / crouch
  15. other

Sensory Issues

Think of room temperature, noise, fumes, dust, odors, and allergies. Also consider the ability to speak and/or communicate, and the visual aspects of the task or assignment.

Sensory Issues

  1. vision
  2. hearing
  3. touch
  4. smell
  5. taste
  6. oral communication
  7. temperature
  8. fumes
  9. external stimuli
  10. lighting
  11. other

Cognitive Issues

Is the assignment done with a group, partner or individually? What memory and communication skills are needed? What is the level of complexity of the task.

Cognitive Challenges

  1. short term memory
  2. long term memory
  3. task complexity
  4. reading
  5. writing
  6. spelling
  7. string of numbers (math)
  8. paying attention
  9. visual, auditory, or kinesthetic learner.
  10. self-esteem / advocacy issues
  11. behavior issues / acting out
  12. other

 

Student Ability Profile: Rocky


Student Abilities Profile 

Narrative:

Rocky is an 18-year-old junior. He is outgoing, tells funny jokes, and teases other students. Rocky is blind and uses a cane for mobility. He reads Braille. He is embarrassed by references to his blindness. His self-advocacy skills and self-esteem are low. He prefers to work without much assistance.

Task/Assignment:

Actively participate in chemistry lab experiences, including manipulating equipment and materials.

Equipment: (lab equipment, furniture, protective clothing, chemicals, etc.)

Typical chemistry lab equipment and chemicals are used in this class. Computers are used for data entry and manipulation and report writing.

Environment: (facility, fumes, odors, dust, temperature, noise, lighting, etc.)

Lab work is typically performed in groups of two or three students.

Physical Challenges

  1. Locating equipment, materials, and other physical objects in the lab.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

  • Provide a thorough lab orientation that includes all safety aspects of the lab and emergency evacuation procedures.
  • Keep lab layout constant.
  • Keep room uncluttered.

Resources

  • Obtain curriculum suggestions from special education teacher and/or therapist.
  • Get information on accessible lab furniture and equipment from local vendor; request purchases as needed.
  • Purchase speech recognition and screen reading software or other adaptive technology.
  • Talk with the student about accommodations.
  • Explore AccessSTEM site at http://www.washington.edu/doit/Stem/ for information on accommodation and adaptive equipment.

Sensory Challenges

  1. No usable vision.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

  • Provide a room orientation.
  • Put Braille labels on equipment and Braille handouts.
  • Provide tactile models.
  • Provide verbal descriptions of visual objects.
  • Have Rocky partner with another student.
  • Give extra time to complete assignments because of slower Braille reading speed.
  • Provide assistance with manipulatives.
  • Equip computer with Braille and speech output.
  • Purchase equipment with speech or tactile output.

Resources

Cognitive Challenges

  1. Low self-esteem.
  2. Poor self-advocacy skills.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

  • Talk to Rocky about learning conditions that work best for him, try his suggestions, and together evaluate the results.
  • Hold expectations high and praise accomplishments.
  • Support on-task behavior.
  • Encourage self-advocacy.

Resources

Physical, Sensory, and Cognitive Issues and Challenges 

Physical Issues

Think of the required physical aspects of the task. What will make the environment accessible, keep the student safe and allow him/her to be an active participant? What lab equipment must be manipulated?

Physical Challenges

  1. lift / carry
  2. stamina / endurance
  3. push / pull
  4. kneel / squat
  5. reach
  6. repetitive tasks
  7. fine motor: pinch / grasp
  8. fine motor: manipulate / maneuver
  9. gross motor
  10. sit in chair
  11. walk / stand
  12. balance
  13. bend / twist
  14. stoop / crouch
  15. other

Sensory Issues

Think of room temperature, noise, fumes, dust, odors, and allergies. Also consider the ability to speak and/or communicate, and the visual aspects of the task or assignment.

Sensory Issues

  1. vision
  2. hearing
  3. touch
  4. smell
  5. taste
  6. oral communication
  7. temperature
  8. fumes
  9. external stimuli
  10. lighting
  11. other

Cognitive Issues

Is the assignment done with a group, partner or individually? What memory and communication skills are needed? What is the level of complexity of the task.

Cognitive Challenges

  1. short term memory
  2. long term memory
  3. task complexity
  4. reading
  5. writing
  6. spelling
  7. string of numbers (math)
  8. paying attention
  9. visual, auditory, or kinesthetic learner.
  10. self-esteem / advocacy issues
  11. behavior issues / acting out
  12. other

Student Ability Profile: John


Student Abilities Profile 

Narrative:

John, a 17-year-old junior, is a bright and intelligent student who loves science. He has aspirations of being a veterinarian. Because of a birth defect, he has only one hand; on the other arm, he has only a small residual limb below the elbow. He has a prosthesis for grasping objects. He has a grabbing device for accomplishing some tasks. He may experience difficulty manipulating small objects. He tries to be as independent as possible. John works well in groups or with a lab partner, always contributing and doing his part of the group assignment. He writes well with his hand.

Task/Assignment:

Actively participate in science classroom and lab experiences, including lab manipulation of small objects.

Equipment: (lab equipment, furniture, protective clothing, chemicals, etc.)

A wide range of science equipment and materials are used in the science lab.

Environment: (facility, fumes, odors, dust, temperature, noise, lighting, etc.)

Classroom work is typically performed individually, and lab work is performed in pairs. The classroom tends to be quiet, and the lab is noisy.

Physical Challenges

  1. Difficulty lifting and carrying lab objects.
  2. Difficulty reaching some objects.
  3. Difficulty pinching and grasping.
  4. Difficulty manipulating fingers.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

  • Pair with a lab partner.
  • Provide a C-clamp for holding objects.
  • Use equipment that requires only one hand to manipulate.
  • Provide a surgical glove for handling wet or slippery items with his hand.
  • Provide handles on beakers and other equipment.
  • Allow more time for setting up, taking notes, and completing tasks.

Resources

Sensory Challenges

None.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

None.

Resources

Not applicable

Cognitive Challenges

None.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

None.

Resources

Not applicable

Physical, Sensory, and Cognitive Issues and Challenges 

Physical Issues

Think of the required physical aspects of the task. What will make the environment accessible, keep the student safe and allow him/her to be an active participant? What lab equipment must be manipulated?

Physical Challenges

  1. lift / carry
  2. stamina / endurance
  3. push / pull
  4. kneel / squat
  5. reach
  6. repetitive tasks
  7. fine motor: pinch / grasp
  8. fine motor: manipulate / maneuver
  9. gross motor
  10. sit in chair
  11. walk / stand
  12. balance
  13. bend / twist
  14. stoop / crouch
  15. other

Sensory Issues

Think of room temperature, noise, fumes, dust, odors, and allergies. Also consider the ability to speak and/or communicate, and the visual aspects of the task or assignment.

Sensory Issues

  1. vision
  2. hearing
  3. touch
  4. smell
  5. taste
  6. oral communication
  7. temperature
  8. fumes
  9. external stimuli
  10. lighting
  11. other

Cognitive Issues

Is the assignment done with a group, partner or individually? What memory and communication skills are needed? What is the level of complexity of the task.

Cognitive Challenges

  1. short term memory
  2. long term memory
  3. task complexity
  4. reading
  5. writing
  6. spelling
  7. string of numbers (math)
  8. paying attention
  9. visual, auditory, or kinesthetic learner.
  10. self-esteem / advocacy issues
  11. behavior issues / acting out
  12. other

Student Ability Profile: Merri


Student Abilities Profile 

Narrative:

Merri is a 16-year-old junior who has had Cerebral Palsy since birth. She uses a wheelchair for mobility and has significant fine motor control difficulties. She can write with a pen or pencil but very slowly. She is quiet in class but friendly. She has difficulty expressing her thoughts verbally but can be understood when she speaks slowly. Her family is very supportive of her participation in all school activities.

Task/Assignment:

Actively participate in science and math classroom and lab experiences, including lab manipulations, field trips, classroom discussions.

Equipment: (lab equipment, furniture, protective clothing, chemicals, etc.)

A wide range of science equipment and materials are used in the science lab. Paper, pencil, chalk, chalkboard, and computers are used in the science and math classroom.

Environment: (facility, fumes, odors, dust, temperature, noise, lighting, etc.)

A field trip to a science museum is planned.

Physical Challenges

  1. Difficulty lifting objects.
  2. Limited fine motor skills make pinching and grasping difficult.
  3. Cannot walk or stand.
  4. Limited ability to turn head.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

  • Provide extra room to maneuver her wheelchair and an accessible lab area and desk. She needs a large flat surface for experiments that is lower and that allows 29" of clearance underneath. Her chair should be facing the board so she does not have to turn her head. A mirror above teacher demonstrations may be helpful.
  • Provide a lap desk for microscope and a taller or extended eyepiece.
  • Provide a lab partner or assign her to a group. The group should be instructed on how to help her participate to the highest degree possible.
  • Take time to allow slower verbalization.
  • Provide assistance with manipulatives.
  • Sit to talk to her at eye level.
  • Allow extra time for lab setup.
  • Allow more time for writing on tests and written assignments.
  • Provide a scribe or note taker for some tasks.
  • Provide a computer with adaptive technology and a printer for writing tasks.
  • Assure that field trip locations are wheelchair-accessible.

Resources

  • Explore options for accessible transportation. Get information on lift equipped vans from district.
  • Find vendors of modified lab equipment and furniture and make purchases as appropriate.
  • Purchase speech recognition software or other adaptive technology.
  • Explore computer software and hardware to assist in computer use and work.
  • Explore AccessSTEM site at http://www.washington.edu/doit/Stem/ for information on accommodation and assistive technology.

Sensory Challenges

None.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

None.

Resources

Not applicable.

Cognitive Challenges

  1. Long-term memory difficulty.
  2. Difficulty completing complex tasks.
  3. Low reading ability.
  4. Writes very slowly.
  5. Poor spelling skills.
  6. Low self-esteem.
  7. Poor self-advocacy skills.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

  • Talk to Merri about learning conditions that work best for her, try her suggestions, and together evaluate the results; encourage self-advocacy efforts.
  • Break down assignments into smaller components.
  • Allow extra time on tests.
  • Allow use of a computer with spelling and grammar checkers.
  • Hold expectations high and praise accomplishments.

Resources

  • Consult the special education teacher, IEP team members, or parents about strategies that maximize success.

Physical, Sensory, and Cognitive Issues and Challenges 

Physical Issues

Think of the required physical aspects of the task. What will make the environment accessible, keep the student safe and allow him/her to be an active participant? What lab equipment must be manipulated?

Physical Challenges

  1. lift / carry
  2. stamina / endurance
  3. push / pull
  4. kneel / squat
  5. reach
  6. repetitive tasks
  7. fine motor: pinch / grasp
  8. fine motor: manipulate / maneuver
  9. gross motor
  10. sit in chair
  11. walk / stand
  12. balance
  13. bend / twist
  14. stoop / crouch
  15. other

Sensory Issues

Think of room temperature, noise, fumes, dust, odors, and allergies. Also consider the ability to speak and/or communicate, and the visual aspects of the task or assignment.

Sensory Issues

  1. vision
  2. hearing
  3. touch
  4. smell
  5. taste
  6. oral communication
  7. temperature
  8. fumes
  9. external stimuli
  10. lighting
  11. other

Cognitive Issues

Is the assignment done with a group, partner or individually? What memory and communication skills are needed? What is the level of complexity of the task.

Cognitive Challenges

  1. short term memory
  2. long term memory
  3. task complexity
  4. reading
  5. writing
  6. spelling
  7. string of numbers (math)
  8. paying attention
  9. visual, auditory, or kinesthetic learner.
  10. self-esteem / advocacy issues
  11. behavior issues / acting out
  12. other

 

Student Ability Profile: Neil


Student Abilities Profile 

Narrative:

Neil is an 18-year-old senior with Cerebral Palsy. He has good upper body strength but limited fine motor skills. Manipulating small objects can be difficult. He uses a wheelchair for long distances and crutches for shorter distances. Neil is cooperative and very assertive in making his physical needs known to his instructors and strives to make his work perfect. He dislikes it when other classmates tease him. He fatigues easily.

Task/Assignment:

Actively participate in science classroom and lab experiences, including field trips.

Equipment: (lab equipment, furniture, protective clothing, chemicals, etc.)

A wide variety of science equipment and materials are used in the science lab.

Environment: (facility, fumes, odors, dust, temperature, noise, lighting, etc.)

Most lab activities are conducted in groups. There are many written assignments. Field trips are planned to local science-related businesses.

Physical Challenges

  1. Low endurance and stamina.
  2. Difficulty reaching equipment.
  3. Limited finger manipulation and difficulty pinching and grasping.
  4. Stands only for short time periods and with support.
  5. Difficulty with balance.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

  • Provide a "grabber" device and surgical gloves to increase ability to grasp.
  • Provide a work station that is wheelchair-accessible.
  • Schedule field trips in wheelchair-accessible locations.
  • Sit to talk with Neil eye-to-eye.
  • Shorten reading time and procedure for labs to avoid fatigue.
  • Provide tape-recorded texts.
  • Give praise for correctly completed tasks.
  • Allow extra time for testing.
  • Provide adaptive technology for computer access.

Resources

  • Consult special education teacher, IEP team members and/or parents for suggestions.
  • Get information on lift-equipped vans available to the school.
  • Explore the AccessSTEM website at http://www.washington.edu/doit/Stem/ to find suggestions for adaptive equipment.
  • Get information on accessible lab furniture from local vendor; make purchases as needed.
  • Purchase adaptive technology for computer access.

Sensory Challenges

None.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

None.

Resources

Not applicable.

Cognitive Challenges

None.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

None.

Resources

Not applicable.

Physical, Sensory, and Cognitive Issues and Challenges 

Physical Issues

Think of the required physical aspects of the task. What will make the environment accessible, keep the student safe and allow him/her to be an active participant? What lab equipment must be manipulated?

Physical Challenges

  1. lift / carry
  2. stamina / endurance
  3. push / pull
  4. kneel / squat
  5. reach
  6. repetitive tasks
  7. fine motor: pinch / grasp
  8. fine motor: manipulate / maneuver
  9. gross motor
  10. sit in chair
  11. walk / stand
  12. balance
  13. bend / twist
  14. stoop / crouch
  15. other

Sensory Issues

Think of room temperature, noise, fumes, dust, odors, and allergies. Also consider the ability to speak and/or communicate, and the visual aspects of the task or assignment.

Sensory Issues

  1. vision
  2. hearing
  3. touch
  4. smell
  5. taste
  6. oral communication
  7. temperature
  8. fumes
  9. external stimuli
  10. lighting
  11. other

Cognitive Issues

Is the assignment done with a group, partner or individually? What memory and communication skills are needed? What is the level of complexity of the task.

Cognitive Challenges

  1. short term memory
  2. long term memory
  3. task complexity
  4. reading
  5. writing
  6. spelling
  7. string of numbers (math)
  8. paying attention
  9. visual, auditory, or kinesthetic learner.
  10. self-esteem / advocacy issues
  11. behavior issues / acting out
  12. other

Student Ability Profile: Richard


Student Abilities Profile 

Narrative:

Richard is an 18-year-old junior who loves math, computers, and cooking. He is profoundly deaf and has low muscle tone and some neurological problems similar to Autism. He does not speak. He is bright but reads two grade levels below his present class status. Richard communicates through sign language interpreters, written notes, and lipreading. Richard can get quite animated and disruptive at times. His self-esteem and self-advocacy skills are low.

Task/Assignment:

Actively participate in science classroom and lab experiences, including lab manipulations.

Equipment: (lab equipment, furniture, protective clothing, chemicals, etc.)

A wide range of science equipment and materials are used in the science lab.

Environment: (facility, fumes, odors, dust, temperature, noise, lighting, etc.)

Many assignments are completed in groups.

Physical Challenges

  1. Difficulty lifting large objects.
  2. Difficulty pushing and pulling.
  3. Loses balance easily.
  4. Cannot stoop or crouch easily.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

  • Provide assistance with manipulatives.
  • Have Richard work with a partner or in a group.
  • Repeat lab safety procedures periodically.

Resources

  • Consult with special education teacher, occupational therapists, IEP team members, and/or parents regarding strategies to address physical limitations.
  • Explore accommodation options at theAccessSTEM website at http://www.washington.edu/doit/Stem/.

Sensory Challenges

  1. Profoundly deaf.
  2. No oral communication.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

  • Make sure you have his attention while speaking.
  • Speak directly to Richard.
  • Provide written material and explain procedures and written content.
  • Team him with another student.
  • Provide lab safety procedures in writing.
  • Work with sign language interpreters.

Resources

Cognitive Challenges

  1. Difficulty working through complex tasks.
  2. Low reading level.
  3. Low self-esteem.
  4. Poor self-advocacy skills.
  5. Exhibits disruptive behavior.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

  • Talk to Richard about learning conditions that work best for him, try his suggestions, and together evaluate the results; encourage self-advocacy efforts.
  • Hold expectations high and praise accomplishments.
  • Pair him with a peer. Assure active participation.
  • Provide materials at appropriate reading level.
  • Provide special assistance with abstract concepts, using manipulatives whenever possible.
  • Provide computer with dictionary, thesaurus, spell-checker,and vocabulary-building components.

Resources

  • Consult with special education teacher, IEP team members, and/or parents regarding social and learning skills and support strategies.
  • Explore accommodation options at theAccessSTEM website at http://www.washington.edu/doit/Stem/.

Physical, Sensory, and Cognitive Issues and Challenges 

Physical Issues

Think of the required physical aspects of the task. What will make the environment accessible, keep the student safe and allow him/her to be an active participant? What lab equipment must be manipulated?

Physical Challenges

  1. lift / carry
  2. stamina / endurance
  3. push / pull
  4. kneel / squat
  5. reach
  6. repetitive tasks
  7. fine motor: pinch / grasp
  8. fine motor: manipulate / maneuver
  9. gross motor
  10. sit in chair
  11. walk / stand
  12. balance
  13. bend / twist
  14. stoop / crouch
  15. other

Sensory Issues

Think of room temperature, noise, fumes, dust, odors, and allergies. Also consider the ability to speak and/or communicate, and the visual aspects of the task or assignment.

Sensory Issues

  1. vision
  2. hearing
  3. touch
  4. smell
  5. taste
  6. oral communication
  7. temperature
  8. fumes
  9. external stimuli
  10. lighting
  11. other

Cognitive Issues

Is the assignment done with a group, partner or individually? What memory and communication skills are needed? What is the level of complexity of the task.

Cognitive Challenges

  1. short term memory
  2. long term memory
  3. task complexity
  4. reading
  5. writing
  6. spelling
  7. string of numbers (math)
  8. paying attention
  9. visual, auditory, or kinesthetic learner.
  10. self-esteem / advocacy issues
  11. behavior issues / acting out
  12. other

 

Student Ability Profile: Alan


Student Abilities Profile 

Narrative:

Alan is a 16-year-old sophomore who has a mild learning disability. He has extreme short-term memory loss and cannot handle complex assignments. He has difficulty processing mathematical concepts (Dyscalculia). Alan is very popular and is a class leader. He demonstrates responsibility and good judgment. He hates to acknowledge that he has a disability. He can get angry when his disability affects his learning, and he does not like to receive special services or be singled out in any way. He will need some special assistance to pass the class.

Task/Assignment:

Actively participating in science classroom and lab experiences,including lab manipulations, field trips.

Equipment: (lab equipment, furniture, protective clothing, chemicals, etc.)

A wide range of science equipment and materials are used in the science lab. Pencils, paper, textbook, chalk, and chalkboard are the primary materials used in the classroom.

Environment: (facility, fumes, odors, dust, temperature, noise, lighting, etc.)

Typical science lab. There is much group work.

Physical Challenges

None.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

None.

Resources

Not applicable.

Sensory Challenges

None.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

None.

Resources

Not applicable.

Cognitive Challenges

  1. Short-term memory difficulty.
  2. Long-term memory difficulty.
  3. Difficulty working through complex tasks.
  4. Low reading skills.
  5. Poor writing skills.
  6. Poor spelling skills.
  7. String of numbers (math).
  8. Exhibits anger at times.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

  • Choose groups carefully. A supportive peer group can prevent some outbursts and hostility. Check progress frequently.
  • Have him take notes on each lesson.
  • Write down all assignments.
  • Encourage use of a electronic day planner.
  • Verbalize carefully and repeat instructions.
  • Provide peer tutoring.
  • Use multimodal teaching techniques.
  • Highlight important vocabulary.
  • Test individually and possibly orally.
  • Use alternate grade reporting.

Resources

Physical, Sensory, and Cognitive Issues and Challenges 

Physical Issues

Think of the required physical aspects of the task. What will make the environment accessible, keep the student safe and allow him/her to be an active participant? What lab equipment must be manipulated?

Physical Challenges

  1. lift / carry
  2. stamina / endurance
  3. push / pull
  4. kneel / squat
  5. reach
  6. repetitive tasks
  7. fine motor: pinch / grasp
  8. fine motor: manipulate / maneuver
  9. gross motor
  10. sit in chair
  11. walk / stand
  12. balance
  13. bend / twist
  14. stoop / crouch
  15. other

Sensory Issues

Think of room temperature, noise, fumes, dust, odors, and allergies. Also consider the ability to speak and/or communicate, and the visual aspects of the task or assignment.

Sensory Issues

  1. vision
  2. hearing
  3. touch
  4. smell
  5. taste
  6. oral communication
  7. temperature
  8. fumes
  9. external stimuli
  10. lighting
  11. other

Cognitive Issues

Is the assignment done with a group, partner or individually? What memory and communication skills are needed? What is the level of complexity of the task.

Cognitive Challenges

  1. short term memory
  2. long term memory
  3. task complexity
  4. reading
  5. writing
  6. spelling
  7. string of numbers (math)
  8. paying attention
  9. visual, auditory, or kinesthetic learner.
  10. self-esteem / advocacy issues
  11. behavior issues / acting out
  12. other

Student Ability Profile: Penny


Student Abilities Profile 

Narrative:

Penny is an 18-year-old senior who is extremely gifted intellectually. She quickly grasps concepts and has a whimsical and creative intellect. Penny is highly unorganized and does not keep track of or turn in assignments. She rarely does any written work on her own without much encouragement. She is noncooperative, and her parents have given up. She participates fully in physical activities but never hands in lab reports or homework.

Task/Assignment:

Actively participating in science and math classroom and lab experiences, including lab manipulations, field trips, and classroom discussions.

Equipment: (lab equipment, furniture, protective clothing, chemicals, etc.)

A wide range of science equipment and materials are used in the science lab. Paper, pencil, chalk, chalkboard, and computers are used in the science and math classroom.

Environment: (facility, fumes, odors, dust, temperature, noise, lighting, etc.)

Typical lab and classroom environments. Field trips occur often.

Physical Challenges

None.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

None.

Resources

Not applicable.

Sensory Challenges

None.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

None.

Resources

Not applicable.

Cognitive Challenges

  1. Poor attention span.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

  • Provide one-to-one support to force the issue of completing assignments. Group work may be distracting to Penny.
  • Provide an assignment book with teacher signatures on a daily or bi-weekly basis and perhaps printed on an electronic day planner.
  • Give lots of follow-up on assignments. Check progress frequently.
  • Communicate with her other teachers.

Resources

Physical, Sensory, and Cognitive Issues and Challenges 

Physical Issues

Think of the required physical aspects of the task. What will make the environment accessible, keep the student safe and allow him/her to be an active participant? What lab equipment must be manipulated?

Physical Challenges

  1. lift / carry
  2. stamina / endurance
  3. push / pull
  4. kneel / squat
  5. reach
  6. repetitive tasks
  7. fine motor: pinch / grasp
  8. fine motor: manipulate / maneuver
  9. gross motor
  10. sit in chair
  11. walk / stand
  12. balance
  13. bend / twist
  14. stoop / crouch
  15. other

Sensory Issues

Think of room temperature, noise, fumes, dust, odors, and allergies. Also consider the ability to speak and/or communicate, and the visual aspects of the task or assignment.

Sensory Issues

  1. vision
  2. hearing
  3. touch
  4. smell
  5. taste
  6. oral communication
  7. temperature
  8. fumes
  9. external stimuli
  10. lighting
  11. other

Cognitive Issues

Is the assignment done with a group, partner or individually? What memory and communication skills are needed? What is the level of complexity of the task.

Cognitive Challenges

  1. short term memory
  2. long term memory
  3. task complexity
  4. reading
  5. writing
  6. spelling
  7. string of numbers (math)
  8. paying attention
  9. visual, auditory, or kinesthetic learner.
  10. self-esteem / advocacy issues
  11. behavior issues / acting out
  12. other

Student Ability Profile: Abby


Student Abilities Profile 

Narrative:

Abby is a 16-year-old sophomore. She sustained a head injury in a boating accident in 8th grade, which reduced her I.Q. She had to re-learn basic skills (alphabet, counting, etc.). Abby's memory is full of "blank" spots. Her social life completely changed when she had to leave honors programs and join "regular ed." Her family is supportive, but conflict between the 4 siblings occurred when Abby appeared to receive more attention than the others.

Task/Assignment:

Successfully complete work in a mathematics class.

Equipment: (lab equipment, furniture, protective clothing, chemicals, etc.)

Paper, pencil, chalk, and chalkboard are the primary tools used in the classroom.

Environment: (facility, fumes, odors, dust, temperature, noise, lighting, etc.)

Typical mathematics class.

Physical Challenges

  1. Facial tics and slight facial paralysis. Jerky, with some uncontrolled body movement.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

  • Provide extra time to respond verbally.
  • Provide one-to-one assistance.
  • Have partner assist with some manipulatives.

Resources

  • Obtain curriculum suggestions from special education teacher and/or therapist.
  • Get information on accessible lab furniture and equipment from local vendor; request purchases as needed.
  • Purchase word recognition software or other adaptive technology.
  • Talk with the student about accommodations.
  • Explore AccessSTEM site at http://www.washington.edu/doit/Stem/ for information on accommodation and adaptive equipment.

Sensory Challenges

None.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

None.

Resources

Not applicable.

Cognitive Challenges

  1. Long-term memory is lacking.
  2. Experiences loss of focus.
  3. Other.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

  • Regularly check for present knowledge level; never assume content knowledge.
  • Probe for information on feelings and thoughts; don't assume consistent reactions.
  • Have her repeat instructions back to the instructor and / or partners to help keep her on task.
  • Check Abby with safety procedures, as she may have forgotten some safety basics and may have difficulty following directions. Make positive specific statements ("Put on safety goggles").

Resources

Physical, Sensory, and Cognitive Issues and Challenges 

Physical Issues

Think of the required physical aspects of the task. What will make the environment accessible, keep the student safe and allow him/her to be an active participant? What lab equipment must be manipulated?

Physical Challenges

  1. lift / carry
  2. stamina / endurance
  3. push / pull
  4. kneel / squat
  5. reach
  6. repetitive tasks
  7. fine motor: pinch / grasp
  8. fine motor: manipulate / maneuver
  9. gross motor
  10. sit in chair
  11. walk / stand
  12. balance
  13. bend / twist
  14. stoop / crouch
  15. other

Sensory Issues

Think of room temperature, noise, fumes, dust, odors, and allergies. Also consider the ability to speak and/or communicate, and the visual aspects of the task or assignment.

Sensory Issues

  1. vision
  2. hearing
  3. touch
  4. smell
  5. taste
  6. oral communication
  7. temperature
  8. fumes
  9. external stimuli
  10. lighting
  11. other

Cognitive Issues

Is the assignment done with a group, partner or individually? What memory and communication skills are needed? What is the level of complexity of the task.

Cognitive Challenges

  1. short term memory
  2. long term memory
  3. task complexity
  4. reading
  5. writing
  6. spelling
  7. string of numbers (math)
  8. paying attention
  9. visual, auditory, or kinesthetic learner.
  10. self-esteem / advocacy issues
  11. behavior issues / acting out
  12. other

 

Student Ability Profile: Tyler


Student Abilities Profile 

Narrative:

Tyler is a 17-year-old senior enrolled in special education. He is diagnosed as having Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD) and has difficulty with written communication. He is friendly and works well with others. He is in constant motion and cannot sit still.

Task/Assignment:

Successfully complete mathematics class.

Equipment: (lab equipment, furniture, protective clothing, chemicals, etc.)

Paper, pencil, chalk, and chalkboard are the primary tools used in the classroom.

Environment: (facility, fumes, odors, dust, temperature, noise, lighting, etc.)

Typical mathematics class.

Physical Challenges

None.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

None.

Resources

Not applicable.

Sensory Challenges

None.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

None.

Resources

Not applicable.

Cognitive Challenges

  1. Has difficulty expressing himself in written form.
  2. Attention span—very active and moves all the time.

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

  • Choose groups carefully. A supportive peer group can be helpful. Check progress frequently.
  • Deliver tests orally; have Tyler dictate test answers.
  • Provide graph paper to help with writing.
  • Provide extra time for class tasks and assignments.
  • Reduce amount of written work, but check frequently for verbal understanding.
  • Provide peer tutoring.
  • Use alternate grade reporting.

Resources

Physical, Sensory, and Cognitive Issues and Challenges 

Physical Issues

Think of the required physical aspects of the task. What will make the environment accessible, keep the student safe and allow him/her to be an active participant? What lab equipment must be manipulated?

Physical Challenges

  1. lift / carry
  2. stamina / endurance
  3. push / pull
  4. kneel / squat
  5. reach
  6. repetitive tasks
  7. fine motor: pinch / grasp
  8. fine motor: manipulate / maneuver
  9. gross motor
  10. sit in chair
  11. walk / stand
  12. balance
  13. bend / twist
  14. stoop / crouch
  15. other

Sensory Issues

Think of room temperature, noise, fumes, dust, odors, and allergies. Also consider the ability to speak and/or communicate, and the visual aspects of the task or assignment.

Sensory Issues

  1. vision
  2. hearing
  3. touch
  4. smell
  5. taste
  6. oral communication
  7. temperature
  8. fumes
  9. external stimuli
  10. lighting
  11. other

Cognitive Issues

Is the assignment done with a group, partner or individually? What memory and communication skills are needed? What is the level of complexity of the task.

Cognitive Challenges

  1. short term memory
  2. long term memory
  3. task complexity
  4. reading
  5. writing
  6. spelling
  7. string of numbers (math)
  8. paying attention
  9. visual, auditory, or kinesthetic learner.
  10. self-esteem / advocacy issues
  11. behavior issues / acting out
  12. other

 

Student Ability Profile Form


Student Abilities Profile 

Narrative:

Task/Assignment:

Equipment: (lab equipment, furniture, protective clothing, chemicals, etc.)

Environment: (facility, fumes, odors, dust, temperature, noise, lighting, etc.)

Physical Challenges

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

Resources

Sensory Challenges

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

Resources

Cognitive Challenges

Potential Strategies / Accommodations

Resources

Physical, Sensory, and Cognitive Issues and Challenges 

Physical Issues

Think of the required physical aspects of the task. What will make the environment accessible, keep the student safe and allow him/her to be an active participant? What lab equipment must be manipulated?

Physical Challenges

  1. lift / carry
  2. stamina / endurance
  3. push / pull
  4. kneel / squat
  5. reach
  6. repetitive tasks
  7. fine motor: pinch / grasp
  8. fine motor: manipulate / maneuver
  9. gross motor
  10. sit in chair
  11. walk / stand
  12. balance
  13. bend / twist
  14. stoop / crouch
  15. other

Sensory Issues

Think of room temperature, noise, fumes, dust, odors, and allergies. Also consider the ability to speak and/or communicate, and the visual aspects of the task or assignment.

Sensory Issues

  1. vision
  2. hearing
  3. touch
  4. smell
  5. taste
  6. oral communication
  7. temperature
  8. fumes
  9. external stimuli
  10. lighting
  11. other

Cognitive Issues

Is the assignment done with a group, partner or individually? What memory and communication skills are needed? What is the level of complexity of the task.

Cognitive Challenges

  1. short term memory
  2. long term memory
  3. task complexity
  4. reading
  5. writing
  6. spelling
  7. string of numbers (math)
  8. paying attention
  9. visual, auditory, or kinesthetic learner.
  10. self-esteem / advocacy issues
  11. behavior issues / acting out
  12. other