Overhead Visuals

Following are examples of templates that can be used in creating overhead visuals for a Capacity-Building Institute (CBI). Many more options can be found in the following publications:

Visual #1

Universal Design in Education: From Principles to Practice

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/ud_edu.html

Visual #2

Universal Design of Learning
Universal Design of Instruction
Universal Design of Technology
Universal Design of Facilities
Universal Design of Student Services

Visual #3

Key Resources

Select "AccessCollege" from the DO-IT website at
www.washington.edu/doit

for

  • The Faculty Room
  • The Conference Room
  • The Board Room
  • The Student Lounge
  • The Center for Universal Design in Education

Visual #4

Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973

"No otherwise qualified individual with a disability shall, solely by reason of his/her disability, be excluded from the participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity of a public entity."

Visual #5

"Otherwise qualified"

meets the academic and technical standards requisite to admission or participation

with or without

  • reasonable modifications to rules, policies, or practices
  • removal of architectural, communication, or transportation barriers
  • provision of auxiliary aids and services.

Visual #6

"Person with a disability"

is any person who:

  • has a physical or mental impairment which substantially limits one or more major life activities including walking, seeing, hearing, speaking, breathing, learning, and working
  • has a record of such an impairment
  • is regarded as having such an impairment

Visual #7

Examples of Disabilities

  • Low Vision
  • Blindness
  • Hearing Impairments
  • Mobility Impairments
  • Mental Health/Psychiatric Impairments
  • Health Impairments
  • Learning Disabilities

 

Visual #8

Access Challenges

  • Physical Differences
  • Sensory Differences
  • Cognitive/Learning Differences
  • Attention Differences
  • Communication Differences
  • Differences in Socioeconomic Status, Race, Culture, Gender

 

Visual #9

Approaches to Access:

  • Accommodations (reactive)
  • Universal Design (proactive)

Visual #10

Accommodations

Alternate formats, services, adjustments, & technology for specific students

Visual #11

Universal Design =

"The design of products and environments to be usable by all people, without the need for adaptation or specialized design."
 

Center for Universal Design, North Carolina State University

Visual #12

Diversity in Postsecondary Institutions

  • Ethnic/Racial Minorities
  • English as a Second Language
  • Different Learning Styles
  • People with Disabilities
  • Age, Gender Differences

Visual #13

Principles of Universal Design

  • Equitable Use
  • Flexibility in Use
  • Simple and Intuitive Use
  • Perceptible Information
  • Tolerance for Error
  • Low Physical Effort
  • Size and Shape for Approach and Use

Visual #14

UD is not:

  • just beneficial to people with disabilities
  • about lowering standards
  • about one-size-fits-all
  • UD can be applied incrementally

Visual #15

UD Products/Environments:

  • are flexible enough to be directly used (without assistive technologies, modifications) by people with a wide range of abilities and circumstances
  • are compatible with assistive technologies and other accommodations for those who cannot efficiently access/use the products/environments directly

Visual #16

UD Steps

  1. Identify application.
  2. Define universe.
  3. Involve consumers.
  4. Adopt guidelines/standards/performance indicators.
  5. Apply UD guidelines/standards/performance indicators.
  6. Plan for accommodations.
  7. Train & support.
  8. Evaluate.


www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Programs/ud.html

Visual #17

Universal Design in Education (UDE) can be applied to:

  • Instruction
  • Student Services
  • Information Technology
  • Physical Spaces

Visual #18

UD of IT

  • Computers
  • Software
  • Websites
  • Videos
  • Office Equipment
  • ...

Visual #19

UD of Computer Labs

  • Planning, Policies, and Evaluation
  • Facility and Environment
  • Lab Staff
  • Information Resources
  • Computer, Software, and Assistive Technology

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Technology/comp.access.html

Visual #20

Problem → Solution

Access to computers → Assistive technology (AT)
Access to electronic design → Universal resources

Visual #21

UD Video/Multimedia Presentation:

  • is videotaped with captions in mind
  • has large, clear captions
  • is designed so that key content is spoken as well as demonstrated visually
  • has audio-described version available

Visual #22

UD of Instruction Steps

  1. Identify course.
  2. Define universe.
  3. Select instructional strategies for good practice.
  4. Adopt guidelines/performance indicators.
  5. Apply UD guidelines/standards/performance indicators.
  6. Plan for accommodations.
  7. Evaluate.

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/equal_access_udi.html

Visual #23

UD of Instruction

  • Class Climate
  • Physical Environments/Products
  • Delivery Methods
  • Information Resources/Technology
  • Interaction
  • Feedback
  • Assessment
  • Accommodation


www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/equal_access_udi.html

Visual #24

UDI Examples

  • Put a statement on your syllabus inviting students to meet with you to discuss disability-related accommodations and other learning needs.
  • Use multiple modes to deliver content (e.g., lecture, discussion, hands-on activities, Internet-based interaction, and fieldwork).
  • Provide class outlines and notes on an accessible website.
  • Face the class and speak clearly.
  • Use captioned videos.
  • Assess student learning using multiple methods.

Visual #25

UD of Curriculum

provides multiple means of:

  • Representation
  • Expression
  • Engagement

Visual #26

UD of Student Services

  • Planning, Policies, & Evaluation
  • Physical Environments/Products
  • Staff Information Resources/Technology
  • Events

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/equal_access_ss.html

Visual #27

UD of instruction, curriculum, student services, technology, physical spaces
minimizes
the need for assistive technology & other accommodations.

Visual #28

There is a need for both:

  • Universal Design (proactive)
  • Accommodations (reactive)

Visual #29

A Fully Accessible Postsecondary Institution

Visual #30

Assure access to:

  • physical spaces
  • computers
  • information resources (e.g., publications, videos, websites)
  • events
  • on-site learning
  • distance learning
  • student services

Visual #31

Address issues related to:

  • procurement
  • development
  • use

and

  • policies
  • procedures
  • training/support

Visual #32

UD Impact on Roles

Diagram of relationship between students with disabilities, disability services and facaulty and staff

Visual #33

Campus Accessibility Indicators

1. Institution-level mission, vision, and values statements are inclusive of all people, including those with disabilities.

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/access_college.html

Visual #34

Campus Accessibility Indicators

2. Disability is included in campus discussions of and training on diversity and special populations.

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/access_college.html

 

Visual #35

Campus Accessibility Indicators

3. Policies, procedures, and practices are regularly reviewed for barrier removal and inclusivity of people with a diverse range of characteristics, including disability.
 

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/access_college.html

Visual #35

Campus Accessibility Indicators

3. Policies, procedures, and practices are regularly reviewed for barrier removal and inclusivity of people with a diverse range of characteristics, including disability.
 

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/access_college.html

Visual #36

Campus Accessibility Indicators

4. Administrators, staff, faculty, and student leaders are trained and empowered to take action around disability and universal design issues.
 

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/access_college.html

Visual #37

Campus Accessibility Indicators

5. People with disabilities are visible (even if their disabilities are not) on campus including in positions of power and authority (e.g., administrators, faculty, student leaders).
 

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/access_college.html

Visual #38

Campus Accessibility Indicators

6. Budgeting reflects the reality of the cost of applying universal design and of accommodating current and prospective employees, students, and visitors with disabilities.
 

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/access_college.html

Visual #39

Campus Accessibility Indicators

7. Measures of student success (e.g., retention, course completion, graduation) are the same for all student populations, including students with disabilities, and institutional research includes this data.
 

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/access_college.html

Visual #40

Campus Accessibility Indicators

8. Campus publications, websites, marketing, and public relations include images and content related to disabilities.
 

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/access_college.html

Visual #41

Campus Accessibility Indicators

9. Campus publications and websites, including web-based courses, meet established accessibility standards.
 

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/access_college.html

Visual #42

Campus Accessibility Indicators

10. Disability issues are regularly included as a component of the curriculum.
 

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/access_college.html

Visual #43

Campus Accessibility Indicators

11. All campus facilities and other spaces are physically accessible.
 

www.washington.edu/doit/Brochures/Academics/access_college.html

Visual #44

Visual #45

The Student Services Conference Room

www.washington.edu/doit/Conf

DO-IT Student Services Conference Room screenshot
 

Visual #46

Visual #47

The Center for UD in Education

www.washington.edu/doit/CUDE

DO-IT Center for Universal Design in Education screenshot