Description

Klallam Dictionary

Timothy Montler

  • paperback not available
  • $85.00s hardcover (9780295992075) Add to Cart
  • Published: September 2012
  • Subject Listing: Native American Studies, Linguistics
  • Bibliographic information: 1008 pp., 8.5 x 11 in.
  • Territorial rights: World
  • Contents

Klallam is the language of the Klallam Tribes, who live at Elwha, Port Gamble, and Jamestown, Washington, and at Becher Bay on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Listed as an endangered language, Klallam is being revived through the energetic efforts of the Klallam Language Program.

Linguist Timothy Montler, working with the elders, educators, and tribal councils of the Klallam Tribes, has compiled an authoritative, comprehensive dictionary, with over 9,000 entries, a grammatical sketch, numerous indexes, and a wealth of cultural information. The Klallam Dictionary adds significantly to knowledge about the Klallam people and the history and culture of Native peoples of the Pacific Northwest.


Timothy Montler is a professor at the University of North Texas. He is the author of many articles and books on Native American languages.

"Rich in authentic cultural content and detailed linguistic analysis, this comprehensive work is an important legacy for the Klallam people and an excellent contribution to research on Salish languages." - Donna Gerdts, Simon Fraser University
Reviews

". . . this dictionary represents a seminal contribution to pedagogy and to future scholarly studies of the language. The compiler's achievement embodies the best results of linguistic documentation in the modern context of language revitalization. Highly recommended." -E. J. Vajda, Choice, May 2013

"Klallam people from all over the Peninsula and beyond turned out for a recent signing ceremony for the dictionary in Port Angeles. Some cradled the book like a baby. Many already had decided where such an important book would be kept in their home. . ." -Lynda Mapes

"The new Klallam Dictionary - celebrated at the gathering of Klallam people from Elwha, Jamestown, and Port Gamble - holds the future of the language. And it holds a lot of history." -Richard Walker, North Kitsap Herald, November 2012