Description

Offspring of Empire

The Koch'ang Kims and the Colonial Origins of Korean Capitalism, 1876-1945

Carter J. Eckert

  • $35.00s paperback (9780295975337) Add to Cart
  • hardcover not available
  • Published: 1996
  • Subject Listing: Asian Studies
    Political Science
  • Bibliographic information: 406 pp., 26 illus.
  • Series: Korean Studies of the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies
  • Contents

Winner of the John Whitney Hall Book Prize, sponsored by the Association for Asian Studies

"Eckert's richly textured book, illustrated by some rare photographs, makes fascinating reading to the last of its many notes. It impresses by its elegant style as well as by the balanced judgement with which the author deals withthe many sensitive issues addressed in this work. . . . This book must become required reading for all students of East Asia in the twentieth century.Journal of the School of Oriental and African Studies"
-Journal of the School of Oriental and African Studies
Contents
Preface
PART 1: THE RISE OF KOREAN CAPITALISM
Merchants and Landlords: The Accumulation of Capital, 1876-1919
An Industrial Bourgeoisie: Transition and Emergence, 1919-45
PART 2: THE PATTERNS OF GROWTH
Class and State: The Financial Nexus
Class and State: Partners in Management
Between Metropole and Hinterland: The Acquisition of Raw Materials and Technology
Between Metropole and Hinterland: The Quest for Markets
PART 3: CLASS AND SOCIETY
"Without Any Trouble": Capitalist Views and Treatment of the Working Class
Class over Nation: Naisen Ittai and the Korean Bourgeoisie
Conclusion: The Colonial Legacy
Appendix 1: Protectorate and Colonial Administrations, 1905-45
Appendix 2: "Dying for a Righteous Cause: The Responsibility of Imperial Citizens in Great"
Notes
Guide to Romanization
Bibliography
Index
Reviews

"This book should be ranked among the best in the field of Korean studies and should be required reading for those interested in Korea studies and/or serious about Japanese and Asian studies."
-Journal of Asian Studies

"

"Eckert's richly textured book, illustrated by some rare photographs, makes fascinating reading to the last of its many notes. It impresses by its elegant style as well as by the balanced judgement with which the author deals withthe many sensitive issues addressed in this work. . . . This book must become required reading for all students of East Asia in the twentieth century."
-Journal of the School of Oriental and African Studies

"No one can now or in the future talk about the Japanese rule in Korea with any degree of authority without reading this book. . . . The book is a work of magnificent scholarship. Eckert has done a great service, advancing our knowledge of modern Korea and Japan."
-Korean Studies