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Instructor Class Description

Time Schedule:

Emily Ignacio
TCSIUS 335
Tacoma Campus

Social Class and Inequality

Examines the problem of persistent urban poverty in the United States. Explores the differential risk of poverty experienced by racial and ethnic groups and by women and children in the context of the major theories of class stratification. Also discusses the factors that lead to extreme-poverty neighborhoods, how these environments affect the life chances of residents, survival strategies of the poor, and public policy implications.

Class description

This class explores the impact of the changing economy (including globalization) on people within the United States. We will critically evaluate “common sense” assessments of the social class, globalization, and “the new economy” and explore how the economy has affected the inequality gap. We will assess the changing economy’s impact on specific issues, such as health care, education, transportation, housing, and tensions within the United States. In particular, we will examine how cultural expectations, the economy, and government policies have people within the United States in the past and present to better understand the opportunities and obstacles we all face.

By the end of the course, we will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the conditions which have, historically, worsened inequalities in the United States. In addition, we will learn about how people are trying to narrow this gap and work towards a more egalitarian and just society.

Student learning goals

General method of instruction

Lecture/Discussion

Recommended preparation

Do all recommended reading; attend class. For writing papers, please seek advice from the Center for Teaching, Learning, and Technology.

Class assignments and grading

Class participation and papers are graded.

50% total participation 50% papers


The information above is intended to be helpful in choosing courses. Because the instructor may further develop his/her plans for this course, its characteristics are subject to change without notice. In most cases, the official course syllabus will be distributed on the first day of class.
Last Update by Emily Ignacio
Date: 09/30/2005