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Instructor Class Description

Time Schedule:

Yong-Chool Ha
POL S 213
Seattle Campus

The Korean Peninsula and World Politics

Introduces Korean politics, economics, society, and international relations. Overviews the development in politics, economy, and society since the late nineteenth century. Addresses the evolution of Korea in the international society by comparing Korea experience with that of China and Japan. Offered: jointly with JSIS A 213.

Class description

Description: North Korean nuclear issues have been one of the thorny international and regional issues for the last twenty years or so. But due to skewed attention to nuclear issues, the political, economic and international aspects of North Korea have been seldom reviewed in relations to nuclear issues. North Korean conundrum is an intriguing question: Several characteristics (a sort of royal succession in politics, closed and defunct, but resilient economy and the tight control over society by the military) of North Korea raise complex questions as to its opening up and ultimately survivability. This course focuses on political, economic, inter-Korean and international development of North Korea for the last 50 years. More specifically, it will review the historical evolution of the North Korean regime and assess its viability in the rapidly changing international and regional environment. Also, various approaches to conceptualize North Korean systems will be critically reviewed in an attempt to project the future of the system. Based on the understanding of domestic system, strategic thinking patterns of North Korea will be explored as they have been manifested in various foreign policy areas, including nuclear issues.

Student learning goals

1 historical understanding of the evolution of North Korea

2. Linkage between domestic and international politics

3. foreign policy of small state

4. Inter-Korean relations

5. Nulcear non-proliferation and North Korea

6. Implications of North Korean problems for regional security order

General method of instruction

lecture, movie viewing and class discussion

Recommended preparation

some background of socialism and North Korea will be useful but not required.

Class assignments and grading

There are three books for purchase:Books for purchase: *Suh, Dae-Sook, Kim Il Sung: The North Korean Leader (Columbia: Columbia University Press, 1988). *Oh, Kongdan and Ralph C. Hassig, North Korea: Through the Looking Glass (D.C.: Brookings Institute Press, 2000).

Korean Peninsula and World Politics: A Study on North Korea

Instructor: Yong-Chool Ha Email: yongha5@u.washington.edu Office Hours: Tues 2:00-4:00(Thomson 238)

Course Description

Description: North Korean nuclear issues have been one of the thorny international and regional issues for the last twenty years or so. But due to skewed attention to nuclear issues, the political, economic and international aspects of North Korea have been seldom reviewed in relations to nuclear issues. North Korean conundrum is an intriguing question: Several characteristics (a sort of royal succession in politics, closed and defunct, but resilient economy and the tight control over society by the military) of North Korea raise complex questions as to its opening up and ultimately survivability. This course focuses on political, economic, inter-Korean and international development of North Korea for the last 50 years. More specifically, it will review the historical evolution of the North Korean regime and assess its viability in the rapidly changing international and regional environment. Also, various approaches to conceptualize North Korean systems will be critically reviewed in an attempt to project the future of the system. Based on the understanding of domestic system, strategic thinking patterns of North Korea will be explored as they have been manifested in various foreign policy areas, including nuclear issues.

Requirements & Grading: one movie review (20%), mid-term exam (30%), term paper (40%), and attendance (10%)

Books for Purchase: **Suh, Dae-Sook, Kim Il Sung: The North Korean Leader (Columbia: Columbia University Press, 1988). **Oh, Kongdan and Ralph C. Hassig, North Korea: Through the Looking Glass (D.C.: Brookings Institute Press, 2000). **Armstrong, Charles, The North Korean Revolution, 1945-1950 (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2003).

Course Outline

Week 1: Introduction: How to understand North Korea? *Samuel Kim, "Research on Korean Communism: Promise versus Performance," World Politics, vol.XXXII, no.2 (January 1980). *Wan-Kyu Choi, "The Current State and Tasks of the Study of Change in the North Korean Political System: A South Korean Perspective,¡± in Chung-in Moon(ed), Understanding Regime Dynamics in North Korea (Yonsei Univ. Press, 1998), pp. 25-64.

Week 2: Historical Origins of the North Korean Government: Colonialism and Division **Suh, pp. 1-54, 55-105. **Armstrong, pp. 38-70, 71-106 *Henderson, G., Korea: The Politics of the Vortex (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1968), chs. 3, 4.

(Recommended) Charles K. Armstrong, ¡°The Nature, Origins, and Development of the North Korean State,¡± in Samuel s. Kim (ed), The North Korean System in the Post-cold War Era (New York: Palgrave, 2001).

Film: ¡°The Taebaek Mountains¡±

Week 3: Korean War: Origins and Challenges to Kim¡¯s Leadership **Suh, pp. 111-157. *Youngho Kim, ¡°International Dimensions of the Korean War,¡± Korea Journal, 38-4 (Winter 1998). *Bruce Cumings, The Origins of the Korean War (Princeton: Princeton University Press), chs. 11 & 12. *Myung-Lim Park, ¡°Order to Attack: North of the 38th Parallel Immediately Before June 25,¡± Korea and World Affairs, Vol XXVI, No.3, Fall 2002, pp. 365-383.

(Recommended) Jian Chen, China's Road to the Korean War (Columbia University Press, 1996), chs. 5, 6, 7 & conclusion. Choi, Sang-Yong, ¡°Trusteeship Debate and the Korean Cold War,¡± in Bonnie B.C. Oh (ed.) Korean Under the American Military Government (Westport, Conn.: Praeger, 2002), pp. 13-39. Kim, Gye-Dong, ¡°Who Initiated the Korean War?¡± in James Cotton and Ian Neary (ed.) The Korean War in History (NJ: Humanities Press International Inc., 1989), pp.33-50. Goncharov, S.N, John Lewis & Xue Litai, Uncertain Partners: Stalin, Mao, and the Korean War (Stanford University Press, 1993), pp.130-167. Jervis, R., "The Impact of the Korean War on the Cold War." The Journal of Conflict Resolution 24(4): 563-592, 1980. Myung-Lim Park, The Requiem for Peace (Nanam Publishing House, 2005).

Week 4: Ideology: Chuch¡¯e **Suh, pp. 300-325. **Oh, pp. 12-40. *Cumings, Bruce, "Kim's Korean Communism," Problem of Communism (March/April, 1974). *Schurmann, Franz, Ideology and Organization in Communist China (University of California Press, 1968), ch.1. *French, Paul, ¡°The Juche state: political theory in North Korea", North Korea -The Paranoid Peninsula (Zed Books Ltd, 2005), 1-8.

Week 5: (#) Mid-term Exam!!

Party, Bureaucracy, and Military **Oh, pp. 81-104, 105-126. *Cummings, Bruce, "Corporatism in North Korea", Journal of Korean Studies, 4 (1982/1983). *Stephen Noerper, "Regime security and military tension in North Korea", Chung-in Moon(ed), Understanding Regime Dynamics in North Korea (Yonsei Univ. Press, 1998), pp. 167-174. *Andrea Matles Savada, ed., North Korea: A Country Study (Washington, DC.: Library of Congress, 1994), ch.5.

(Recommended) Schurmann, Franz, Ideology and Organization in Communist China (University of California Press, 1968), ch.2. McCormack, Gavan, "Kim Country: Hard Times in North Korea", New Left Review, 189 (1993). Robert A. Scalapino and Chong-Sik Lee, Communism in Korea, Part II: The Society (Berkeley: California University Press, 1972), ch.XII.

Week 6: Economy and Society **Armstrong, pp. 136-165. **Oh, pp. 41-80, 127-147. *Jae-Jin Suh, "Class Conflict and Regime Crisis in North Korea", Chung-in Moon(ed), Understanding Regime Dynamics in North Korea (Yonsei Univ. Press, 1998), pp. 195-218. *Hong-Tack Chun, "Economic Conditions in North Korea and Prospects for Reform," Thomas H. Henriksen and Jongryn Mo, eds., North Korea after Kim Il Sung: Continuity or Change? (Hoover Press, 1997).

(Recommended) Paul French, ¡°The revolutionary dynasty: leadership in North Korea", North Korea -The Paranoid Peninsula (Zed Books Ltd, 2005), 48-69. Marcus Noland, "Prospects for a North Korean External Economic Opening," Thomas H. Henriksen and Jongryn Mo, eds., North Korea after Kim Il Sung: Continuity or Change? (Hoover Press, 1997).

Film: ¡°A State of Mind¡±(2003)

Week 7: Foreign Policy I: Cold War, the Sino-Soviet Dispute, and Post-Cold War **Oh, pp. 148-184. *S. Kim, "In Search of a Theory of North Korean Foreign Policy," S. Kim ed., North Korean Foreign Relations: In the Post-Cold War Era (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998). *Chin-wi Chong, Pyongyang between Peking and Moscow: North Korea¡¯s Involvement in the Sino-Soviet Dispute, 1958-1975 (University, Ala.: University of Alabama Press, 1978), Introduction. *Don Oberdorfer, The Two Koreas (Basic Books, 2002), Ch. 9-10 (pp.200-250).

(Recommended) *Byung Chul Koh, The Foreign Policy of North Korea (New York: Praeger 1969).

Week 8: Foreign Policy II: North Korea and Major powers *Lee, Chae-Jin, "China in North Korean Foreign Policy", Byung Chul Koh(ed), North Korea and the World (Kyungnam Univ. Press, 2004), 199-238. *Yong-Chool Ha, ¡°Soviet Perceptions of Soviet-North Korean Relations,¡± Asian Survey, Vol. 26, No. 5 (May, 1986), pp. 573-590. *Koh, Byung Chul, "North Korean Policy Toward the United States", Suh Dae-Sook and Lee Chae-Jin eds., North Korea After Kim Il Sung (Lynne Rienner Publishers, 1998). *Manyin, Mark, "Japan-North Korea Relations: Selected Issues", CRS Issue Brief for Congress (2003.11.26).

(Recommended) *Kim, Tae-Seo, "Changing Nature of China's Influence over North Korea in the Post-Cold War Era", East Asian Review, 10, 4 (Winter 1998). *Lee, Chae-Jin, "China and North Korea: An Uncertain Relationship", D.S. Suh and C. J. Lee, eds., North Korea After Kim Il Sung (1998).

Film: ¡°Joint Security Area¡±

Week 9: Inter-Korean Relations *Samuel S. Kim, ¡°Inter-Korean Relations in Northeast Asian Geopolitics,¡± in Charles K. Armstrong (ed.), Korea at the Center: Dynamics of Regionalism in Northeast Asia (M.E. Sharpe, 2006). *Chaesung Chun, ¡°North-South Relations Viewed from the Perspective of the Recent Transformation of the Cold War Order in Northeast Asia,¡± Korea Journal, 41-2 (Summer, 2001), pp. 27-58. *Koh, Byung Chul, "Approaches to National Reunification by the Two Koreas", Byung Chul Koh ed., The Korean Peninsula in Transition: The Summit and Its Aftermath (KyoungNam University Press, 2002). *Babson, Bradley, "Inter-Korean Economic Relations In A Regional Context", Byung Chul Koh ed., The Korean Peninsula in Transition: The Summit and Its Aftermath (KyoungNam University Press, 2002).

(Recommended) Johnston, Eric, "The North Korea Abduction Issues and Its Effect on Japanese Domestic Politics", JPRI Working Paper 101 (June 2004). Scott Snyder, "Expected role of South Korea and major stakeholders: NGO contributions to and roles in North Korea's rehabilitation", Ahn Choong-yong (eds.), A New International Engagement Framework For North Korea? (Korea Economic Institute of America, 2004), 367-85. Hak-chun Kim, North and South Korea: internal politics and external relations since 1988 (Mississauga, Ont.: Society for Korean and Related Studies, 2006). Key-young Son, South Korean Engagement Policies and North Korea: Identities, Norms and the Sunshine Policy (London: Routledge, 2006). Norman D. Levin, Yong-Sup Han, Sunshine in Korea: The South Korean Debate over Policies toward North Korea (Santa Monica, CA: RAND, 2002).

Week 10: Nuclear Crisis and Future Paths *Dukmin Yun, ¡°Historical Origins of the North Korean Nuclear Issue: Examining 20 Years of Negotiation Records,¡± Korea Journal, 45-4 (Winter 2005). *Gilbert Rozman, ¡°The North Korean Nuclear Crisis and U.S. Strategy in Northeast Asia,¡± Asian Survey, 47-4 (Aug., 2007), pp. 601-621. *Cha, Victor and David Kang, Nuclear North Korea: A Debate on Engagement Strategies (Columbia University Press, 2003), Ch. 1, 3, 5. *Stephan Haggard and Marcus Noland, ¡°North Korea in 2007: Shuffling in from the Cold,¡± Asian Survey, 48-1 (Feb., 2008), pp. 107-115.

(Recommended) Niksch, Larry, ¡°North Korea's Nuclear Weapons Program,¡± CRS Issue Brief for Congress (2002.11.27). Sigal, Leon, Disarming Strangers: Nuclear Diplomacy with North Korea (Princeton University Press, 1998). Liu Ming, China's role in the course of North Korea's transition", Ahn Choong-yong (eds.), A New International Engagement Framework For North Korea? (Korea Economic Institute of America, 2004), 335-350. Bruce Cumings, ¡°Decoupled from history: North Korea in the ¡°axis of evil"", Inventing the axis of evil- the truth about north korea, iran, and syria (The New Press, 2004), 1-92. Jasper Becker, ¡°Introduction", Rogue Regime: Kim Jong Il and the looming threat of North Korea (Oxford Univ. Press, 2005), 1-19. Yong-Sup Han, "Resolving the north korean nuclear issue", Peace and Arms Control on the Korean Peninsula (Kyungnam Univ. Press, 2005), 3-109.

Term Paper due by June 10!!!

Requirements & Grading: one movie review (20%), mid-term exam (30%), term paper (40%), and attendance (10%)


The information above is intended to be helpful in choosing courses. Because the instructor may further develop his/her plans for this course, its characteristics are subject to change without notice. In most cases, the official course syllabus will be distributed on the first day of class.
Additional Information
Last Update by Yong-Chool Ha
Date: 03/17/2009