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Instructor Class Description

Time Schedule:

Renee Agatsuma
PHG 300
Seattle Campus

Implications of Public Health Genomics for the Modern World

Introduces the field of public health genomics through examples of genetic, ethical, political, and social issues emerging in the wake of the Human Genome Project. Students develop the skills to analyze and critique public health, clinical, personal, and social implications resulting from emerging genomic technologies. Offered: A.

Class description

In this course, offered by the Institute for Public Health Genetics, we will be learning and discussing how genetic developments are actively changing the world around us and how genes and genetics continue to fascinate, connect and divide human society. The course surveys compelling genetic and social issues emerging in the wake of the Human Genome Project. For example, many fresh genomic applications have ethical, societal, political and legal dimensions that are only just beginning to be appreciated. This course will develop students’ ability to analyze these dimensions, and to evaluate new genetic technologies that are currently being developed in the marketplace. We’ll use perspectives from public health, clinical medicine, anthropology, law, ethics and social studies to investigate the hopes and hype presented by genomics In weekly discussion sections, students will review, discuss, and go more into depth into the ethical, legal, social, and scientific issues brought up in readings and lectures

Student learning goals

Define and interpret the fundamental underpinnings of genetics and genomics

Describe the relationship and impacts of genomics on public health

Identify risks and benefits of genomic innovations

Evaluate the public health, clinical, and social utility of genomic innovations

Critically analyze media presentations that present genetic science and its applications

General method of instruction

The course grade will be based upon a midterm, final examination for those taking 3 credits. For those taking 5 credits, the grade includes the previous, a weekly set of responses to discussion questions based on the readings, and posting on a blog.

Recommended preparation

There are no prerequisites for this course.

Class assignments and grading

For students taking 3 Credits: The course grade will be based upon a midterm, and final examination with the midterm counting for 35% of your grade and the final exam counting for 65% for your grade. The midterm and the final exam will be a combination of complex multiple choice and true/false questions. Both exams will be administered using the Catalyst web-based testing system.

For students taking 5 Credits: The course grade will be based a midterm exam, a final exam, and participation in a hour long weekly discussion section and blog posting. The midterm will account for 30% of your grade, the final exam for 40%, and the discussion question responses and blog participation for 30%. The midterm and the final exam will be a combination of complex multiple choice and true/false questions. Both exams will be administered using the Catalyst web-based testing system.

The midterm and the final exam will be a combination of complex multiple choice and true/false questions. Both exams will be administered using the Catalyst web-based testing system.

Students will be required to attend weekly discussion sections and complete questions based on readings. The answers to these questions will be collected at the beginning of discussion section, and graded for a total of 10 points based on completion and quality of answers (see syllabus for detailed information on scoring). Students will also be graded based on attendance – 10 points for being on time and participating in discussion section or 5 pts for being more than 10 minutes late OR not participating at all.The weekly blog discussion will be graded as follows: 10 points for at least 3 meaningful responses, 5 points for 1 – 2 meaningful responses, 0 points for no response

All exams and assignments are subject to the University of Washington’s Student Conduct Code including sanctions and disciplinary actions [http://www.washington.edu/students/handbook/conduct.html] Grading will conform to the University of Washington’s Standard Grading Policy as detailed at http://www.washington.edu/students/gencat/front/Grading_Sys.html#GRADE


The information above is intended to be helpful in choosing courses. Because the instructor may further develop his/her plans for this course, its characteristics are subject to change without notice. In most cases, the official course syllabus will be distributed on the first day of class.
PHG 300 Course Website
Last Update by Renee Agatsuma
Date: 08/27/2012