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Instructor Class Description

Time Schedule:

James N Gregory
HSTAA 105
Seattle Campus

The Peoples of the United States

Surveys American diversity since 1500. Repeopling of America through conquest and immigration by Native Americans, Europeans, Africans, Asians, and Latin Americans. Contributions of various peoples and the conflicts between them, with special attention to changing constructions of race and ethnicity and evolving understandings of what it means to be American.

Class description

This course explores the history of America's many peoples. Beginning with the centuries that preceded the birth on an American nation, we will examine the sequences of immigration and conquest that eventually made the United States one of the most ethnically and racially diverse societies on earth. The consequences of diversity are another theme of the course. We will explore both the contributions of various peoples and the conflicts between them, paying special attention to the historical construction of race and ethnicity and the changing understandings of American citizenship. "What is an American?" each generation has asked, usually answering in terms that are new to their era.

Student learning goals

General method of instruction

Recommended preparation

No prerequisites.

Class assignments and grading

Grades will be based on four elements: midterm, final, research paper, and participation in discussion section. Since this is a W-course, one of the assignments is an 8-10 page paper that involves research either on your family history or in a newspaper from the 1930s. The paper will count for 30% of the grade; the final 30%; midterm 20%; discussion section 20%.

Students automatically earn W-credits in this course.


The information above is intended to be helpful in choosing courses. Because the instructor may further develop his/her plans for this course, its characteristics are subject to change without notice. In most cases, the official course syllabus will be distributed on the first day of class.
Additional Information
Last Update by James N Gregory
Date: 10/04/2013