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Instructor Class Description

Time Schedule:

Anna Wald
EPI 527
Seattle Campus

Vaccines

Overview of issues in vaccine development, clinical trials, implementation of vaccination programs, and the role of vaccines in the control of infectious diseases. Emphasizes current issues and real-world challenges in the vaccine field and features critical reading of the literature. Prerequisite: either EPI 511, EPI 512, or EPI 513. Offered: A.

Class description

http://courses.washington.edu/vaccines/This course provides an overview of issues in vaccine development, clinical trials, implementation of vaccination programs, and the role of vaccines in the control of infectious diseases. The course is designed to meet the needs of public health students interested in infectious diseases and their control. It is open to students who have completed EPI 512 and 513 and to others with permission of the instructor. Topics will be organized to achieve a core curriculum that covers medical, epidemiologic, biostatistical and public policy issues relating to vaccines. Learning will be achieved both through presentations that focus on successes and failures of individual vaccines and methodologically oriented topics. Format will include didactic presentations with discussion, and student-led case presentations of existing or potential vaccines. An emphasis will be placed on issues which foster interaction between clinical and public health professionals (if students from multiple disciplines are enrolled).

Student learning goals

1. Describe the impact of vaccine-preventable diseases on global mortality and morbidity, with an emphasis on childhood illness.

2. Explain basic tenets of vaccine design, including immunologic basis of vaccine efficacy, types of vaccines, and vaccine-associated immunity.

3. Identify the characteristics of pathogens that render them potential targets for control via vaccination.

4. Discuss the concept of herd immunity as it relates to vaccines, and identify the characteristics of infections, populations and immunizations that bear impact on herd immunity.

5. Describe the process of clinical development of a candidate vaccine and the mechanisms for monitoring efficacy and safety at each stage of development.

6. Enumerate the historical and social factors that lead to rejection of vaccines in certain populations and describe techniques that are used to overcome vaccine hesitancy.

General method of instruction

The course will meet twice a week for 1.5 hours, and consist of presentations and discussions regarding a wide range of vaccine-related topics. It will emphasize current issues and real world challenges in the vaccine field. The course will feature critical reading of the literature.

Recommended preparation

The course is designed to meet the needs of public health students interested in infectious diseases and their control. It is open to students who have completed EPI 512 and 513 or EPI 511, and to others with permission of the instructor. Please do not hesitate to contact me if you are interested but have not fulfilled the prerequisites.

Class assignments and grading

Course Requirements:

1. Class presentations. Each student will play a role in class presentations. More detail on these presentations is provided below. If class registration is of sufficient magnitude, student groups will conduct these presentations. 2. Class participation. Students should come to the sessions prepared, and participate in the discussion. The assigned readings should be read in advance and students should be able to discuss the material. 3. Brief paper based on the presentation. The paper should be maximum of 5 double-spaced pages. The paper is due the last day of class. 4. Examination. There will be no examination.

Class Presentations and Paper 60% Judged on quality of: student preparation; presentation and paper content; presentation and paper materials; presentation style. Class Participation 40% Judged on participation in class discussions.

This course is offered on a standard grading scale. Students have the option to change to S/NS. See the Academic Calendar (http://www.washington.edu/students/reg/calendar.html) for policy and deadlines.


The information above is intended to be helpful in choosing courses. Because the instructor may further develop his/her plans for this course, its characteristics are subject to change without notice. In most cases, the official course syllabus will be distributed on the first day of class.
Course Website
Last Update by Angelica M. Buck
Date: 10/10/2012