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Instructor Class Description

Time Schedule:

Bruce M. Psaty
EPI 519
Seattle Campus

Epidemiology of Cardiovascular Disease

Principles, methods, and issues in the epidemiology of cardiovascular disease. Focuses on coronary heart disease and its major risk factors; also covers other topics such as stroke and sudden death. The format includes informal lectures and discussions of the current literature. Prerequisite: EPI 511 or EPI 512, EPI 513. Offered: A.

Class description

Principles, methods, and issues in the epidemiology of cardiovascular disease. Focuses on coronary heart disease and its major risk factors; also covers other topics such as stroke and sudden death.

Student learning goals

By the end of the course:

1. the student will learn what is known and not known about the major determinants and consequences of cardiovascular risk factors, subclinical disease, and clinical diseases.

2. The student will understand epidemiologic methods and concepts, such as measurement, bias, and generalizability, as they apply to research on the determinants and consequences of cardiovascular disease.

3. The student will understand opportunities and barriers to the application of knowledge in the clinical and public health setting related to the prevention of cardiovascular disease.

4. The student will understand special research problems, major research directions, and methodologic challenges related to cardiovascular epidemiology and prevention.

5. The student will have an opportunity to develop skills of critical reading, writing, and speaking, as they relate to research questions in the field of cardiovascular epidemiology and prevention.

General method of instruction

The course includes small group informal lectures given by the instructors, by guest lecturers, and by the students themselves.

Recommended preparation

Prerequisite: EPI 511 or EPI 512, EPI 513.

Class assignments and grading

For most lectures, readings from the published literature are suggested. These articles provide important perspectives on many of the topics covered in the course; and, they should be read prior to each lecture. A short term paper and a short presentation are required. There is no examination. Grades depend the quality of the work as well as class participation.


The information above is intended to be helpful in choosing courses. Because the instructor may further develop his/her plans for this course, its characteristics are subject to change without notice. In most cases, the official course syllabus will be distributed on the first day of class.
Course Website
Last Update by Angelica M. Buck
Date: 05/09/2013