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Instructor Class Description

Time Schedule:

Julie A. Larios
jalarios@u.washington.edu
ENGL 283
Seattle Campus

Beginning Verse Writing

Intensive study of the ways and means of making a poem.

Class Description

For SUMMER 2003: This course will take as its guiding principle what poet Richard Kenney calls “rigorous insouciance” – that is, the demand that we work hard at playing. Primary to our success will be a common delight in the English language at its most essential level, that of sound and rhythm, a quality Ezra Pound called “melopoeia.” To open out the focus, we’ll look at the other –poeias: phanopoeia (vision's interplay with imagination) and logopoeia (intellect's interplay with imagination). Still, we’ll always come back to the base-line pleasures of sound. Students will write poems and have them critiqued by fellow class members. Memorization and recitations of non-student poems will be required, as will a daily log of observations about the oddities of language and the observable world. Short individual presentations will be scheduled based on student interests and readings from a course packet prepared by the instructor. Please come to the first class with two poems: one of your own, and one not your own but well-loved. Extra points if the latter employs formal tools like rhyme, meter, and form, and even more points if you have that poem memorized and ready to share with the rest of us.

This is a workshop-format class, but there will be a substantial amount to read (and respond to) from a course packet of essays about and examples of the art and craft of poetry.

Recommended preparation

Class Assignments and Grading

Three factors will be considered in assigning final grades: 1)engagement in class discussions regarding student poems and assigned readings. 2)completion (on time) of all written assignments. 3)quality of final portfolio.


The information above is intended to be helpful in choosing courses. Because the instructor may further develop his/her plans for this course, its characteristics are subject to change without notice. In most cases, the official course syllabus will be distributed on the first day of class.
Additional ENGL course descriptions.
jalarios@u.washington.edu
Last Update by Julie A. Larios
Date: 06/13/2003