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Instructor Class Description

Time Schedule:

Lauren M Grant
ENGL 230
Seattle Campus

English Literary Culture: After 1800

British literature in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Study of literature in its cultural context, with attention to changes in form, content, and style.

Class description

This class will be a brief survey of British fiction and drama 1800 - present. Our primary focus will be literature's representation of marriage as a social institution that defines and fixes a woman's place in the social sphere. We will begin with the following broad questions: How does literature define marriage, and how does this change with time? Why might the novel and drama as literary genres be especially concerned with the question of marriage? How does literature address the social and public roles that are available for women outside of marriage. Along more formal lines, we will also track trends in narration as the novel progress from 1800 - present. How does each author's choice of narrative style allow for a unique presentation of the marriage question?

Texts will include: Jane Austen's Mansfield Park, Charlotte Bronte's Villette, Thomas Hardy's Tess of the d'Urbervilles, Ford Madox Ford's The Good Soldier, Harold Pinter's The Lover, and John Fowles' The French Lieutenant's Woman.

Student learning goals

General method of instruction

Recommended preparation

Class assignments and grading

The reading load in this course will be heavy; you can expect approximately 50 pages of reading a night. You will also be responsible for leading discussion at least one day during the quarter and writing several short reading responses. There will be a final exam.


The information above is intended to be helpful in choosing courses. Because the instructor may further develop his/her plans for this course, its characteristics are subject to change without notice. In most cases, the official course syllabus will be distributed on the first day of class.
Last Update by Lauren M Grant
Date: 02/13/2009