Search | Directories | Reference Tools
UW Home > Discover UW > Student Guide > Course Catalog 

Instructor Class Description

Time Schedule:

Jeffrey H. Frace
DRAMA 454
Seattle Campus

Projects in Acting

Rehearsal and classroom performance of dramatic literature of various periods and styles.

Class description

The Suzuki Method is a rigorous physical and vocal discipline for actors, created by renowned theater artist Tadashi Suzuki and his company. The method is designed to regain the perceptive abilities and powers of the human body. Drawing on a unique combination of traditional and innovative forms, the training strives to restore the wholeness of the body as a tool of theatrical expression.

The Viewpoints is a technique of improvisation first articulated by choreographer Mary Overlie who broke down the two dominant issues performers deal with time and space into six categories. Her work represents a non-hierarchical post-modern approach to theater training. Since that time, Artistic Director Anne Bogart and SITI Company have adapted the Viewpoints to serve as a basis for their training. The Viewpoints allows a group of actors to function together spontaneously and intuitively and to generate bold, theatrical work quickly. It develops flexibility, articulation and strength in movement and speaking, and makes ensemble playing really possible.

Student learning goals

General method of instruction

Recommended preparation

One thing all students should know is to wear movement clothes; for Suzuki, shorts are best, and we will work in cotton socks (or tabi); and for Viewpoints, any movement pants such as yoga/dance/or trackpants and we will work barefoot.

Class assignments and grading


The information above is intended to be helpful in choosing courses. Because the instructor may further develop his/her plans for this course, its characteristics are subject to change without notice. In most cases, the official course syllabus will be distributed on the first day of class.
Last Update by Susan L Bruns
Date: 11/10/2008