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Instructor Class Description

Time Schedule:

Amy M Lambert
BISIA 213
Bothell Campus

Art Techniques

Develops intermediate skills and applications in one or more studio arts in order to enhance students' abilities as performers, arts creators, or educators. Recommended: B CUSP 197 or prior experience.

Class description

WINTER 2014 BISIA 213 B SCULPTING THE HUMAN FORM (see below for BISIA 213 D DRAWING PRACTICE AND CRITICAL THINKING)

This studio art course introduces students to the principles of three dimensional art and design through examination of the human form. Students will use basic construction materials such as modeling clay, wire, cardboard and plaster to learn fundamental concepts such as spatial orientation, volume, balance and positive and negative form. Techniques for the construction of armatures and application of clay will be covered in studio. We will explore how the study of three-dimensional form can be integrated across disciplines and effectively synthesize diverse subject matter related to the human form as it relates to performance. In particular, we will render the human form through a series of observation-based studies of live performances. Studio classes will include instructional exercises, independent work and group critique. Additionally, we will discuss the use of the human form in contemporary sculpture. We will look at the work of a wide variety of contemporary artists including Seattle-based artist John Grade, distinguished French-American sculptor Louise Bourgeois and Korean sculptor and installation artist Do-Hu Suh.

The studio classroom is an open working environment that allows you to inspire each other while working. It is also an environment that demands focus and concentration on complex design projects. Studio practice encourages active learning and requires critical thinking. For this reason, you must come to class prepared. Some students are surprised when they find out they must attend every class meeting and put in more time on art-related projects than in a standard class.

BISIA 213 D DRAWING PRACTICE AND CRITICAL THINKING (3 CREDITS) This studio course will explore strategies for the production and critical examination of drawing. This course is an intermediate course designed to build on introductory drawing skills. The focus of the course is studio practice, specifically, creating drawings from observation.

A primary goal of this course is to gain a better understanding of the self and the environment we live in. Drawing projects include rendering from the figure, still-life and natural environment. In addition to drawing projects, studio includes instructor led drawing exercises, group critique and critical discourse on contemporary drawings. Through reading, writing and discussion we will examine the work of several contemporary artists. Specifically, we will look at the work of artists, Sol Kjok, Alexis Rockman and Sangram Majumdar. My objective is that you develop skills to critically analyze and interpret contemporary drawings that help to inform your drawing practice.

The studio classroom is an open working environment that allows you to inspire each other while working. It is also an environment that demands focus and concentration on complex drawing projects. Studio practice encourages active learning and requires critical thinking. For this reason, you must come to class prepared. Some students are surprised when they find out they must attend every class meeting and put in more time on drawing projects than in a standard class.

Student learning goals

BISIA 213 B SCULPTING THE HUMAN FORM (goals listed below)

BISIA 213 D DRAWING PRACTICE AND CRITICAL THINKING (6 goals listed below) Employ strategies of constructing images and find appropriate mark-making to describe something in a particular way using analytical visual knowledge (i.e., communicate visually) Develop an appreciation of contemporary drawing by evaluating a range of subject matter, symbols and ideas including the relationship of artworks to history and cultures

Analyze a particular feature; examine relationships between tonal, textural or linear differences. Based on analysis determine arrangement, identify components in relation to the whole, compare what is seen to what is known, compare what is seen to what is drawn and question assumptions about the way objects look

Develop language and writing skills to effectively communicate about contemporary art

Conceive of the drawing as a whole and connote meaning in relation to surface features, compositional planning and other mark-making strategies

Conceive of novel ideas of approaching drawing assignments and exploiting drawing as a means to address an identified issue

General method of instruction

Hands-on art instruction will be provide for studio exercises. Course material will be presented through visual imagery, small-group discussions and readings. Art projects are expected to be completed outside of class time.

Recommended preparation

Prior coursework in visual art (intro to drawing or design) and/or art history can be useful but is not required. Recommend that you have an interest in contemporary art.

Class assignments and grading

Art assignemts are evaluated based on willingness to take risks in exploring ideas (conceptual and intellectual pursuit), development of ideas and progress of work (artistic process), appropriate use of tools (craftsmanship) and presentation (ambition and investment).

Grades will be based on in-class participation in studio exercises, homework/sketchbook assignments and art projects.


The information above is intended to be helpful in choosing courses. Because the instructor may further develop his/her plans for this course, its characteristics are subject to change without notice. In most cases, the official course syllabus will be distributed on the first day of class.
Last Update by Amy M Lambert
Date: 11/20/2013