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Instructor Class Description

Time Schedule:

Robertson Lee Allen
BISGST 397
Bothell Campus

Topics in Global Studies

Examines a topic, theme, problem, or area of the world in order to provide a deeper understanding of an aspect of Global Studies.

Class description

This course will cover recent anthropological contributions to theories and studies of violence and war. The readings will include two required course books:

Carolyn Nordstrom's "Global Outlaws":

http://www.amazon.com/Global-Outlaws-Contemporary-California-Anthropology/dp/0520250966

and Matthew Gutmann and Catherine Lutz's "Breaking Ranks":

http://www.amazon.com/Breaking-Ranks-Veterans-Speak-against/dp/0520266382/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1360905988&sr=1-2&keywords=breaking+ranks

Additional readings will be provided through the course reserves.

Student learning goals

To understand how global conflicts affect localities and individuals in idiosyncratic ways

To investigate, apply, and make relevant anthropological and social scientific theories of violence and war

To question critically the idea that humans are "naturally violent"

To explore how understandings of war and violence are always culturally specific

To provide students the opportunity to share their understandings of the course material in a variety of ways, through classroom discussion (and discussion leadership), peer review, reflection writing, and constructing a research paper

General method of instruction

Short class lectures; small group discussions; large class discussions (instructor and student facilitated); films and video clips; guest speakers

Recommended preparation

General familiarity with ethnographic methods, anthropology, or qualitative research, in addition to knowledge of recent global conflicts and issues, will significantly further student success in the course.

Class assignments and grading

Two reading analyses (800-1000 words): 10% each = 20%; Four quizzes (dropping lowest): 8% each = 24%; Final research paper (1600-2000 words) = 21%; Group discussion leadership on reading = 15%; Class participation = 20%


The information above is intended to be helpful in choosing courses. Because the instructor may further develop his/her plans for this course, its characteristics are subject to change without notice. In most cases, the official course syllabus will be distributed on the first day of class.
Last Update by Robertson Lee Allen
Date: 02/15/2013