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Instructor Class Description

Time Schedule:

Loren K. Redwood
BISAMS 367
Bothell Campus

Exploring American Culture: Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration

Examines how contested discourses of racial, ethnic, and national difference have shaped ideas about citizenship and "American" identities. Focuses on the relationship between these discourses and social, economic, and political practices and policies. Stresses diverse interpretive approaches within American Studies.

Class description

In this course, students examine how contested discourses of racial, ethnic, and national difference have shaped ideas about citizenship and "American" identities. Specifically, this course focuses on the relationship between these discourses and social, economic, and political practices and policies, while also emphasizing diverse interpretive approaches within American Studies. We delve into the following framing questions: What have been the relationships between immigration and ideas of "America" over the nation's history? How have immigration flows been managed in different eras and for what ends? How do race and ethnicity come into play in discourses of what "America" is and who "Americans" are?

Student learning goals

•To provide a historical overview of immigration to the United States and the policies governing these flows;

•To examine the interplay between ideas about Americanness and the racialization of immigrants to the United States

•To learn about and practice textual analysis as a method of research into the expression of ideas about race and ethnicity in American culture;

•To practice the cogent expression of ideas and arguments in speaking and writing

General method of instruction

Lecture, Large and Small Group work,critical reflection of course readings, and various writing exercises.

Recommended preparation

There are no prerequisites for this course, however, some historical knowledge of colonization and imperialism in the US context will be useful.

Class assignments and grading

Double entry journal Critical Reflection Papers One outside activity Portfolio posting

Participation and preparation for each class day is vital to your success in the course. Completion of all written assignment properly and on time.


The information above is intended to be helpful in choosing courses. Because the instructor may further develop his/her plans for this course, its characteristics are subject to change without notice. In most cases, the official course syllabus will be distributed on the first day of class.
Last Update by Loren K. Redwood
Date: 04/28/2013