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Instructor Class Description

Time Schedule:

Georgia M. Roberts
BIS 420
Bothell Campus

Colonizing History in Sub-Saharan Africa

Considers the history of colonization in Africa and the writing of that history, dealing with debates around post-colonial theory. Provides a better understanding of how relationships between Sub-Saharan Africa and other parts of the world have developed, and how we have come to understand those relationships.

Class description

This class explores the history of colonization in sub-Saharan Africa and the writing of that history. Special attention will be paid to the ways in which colonial discourse continues to play a role in current events affecting both sub-Saharan Africa and the rest of the world. The aim of the course is to provide students with a better understanding of how relationships between sub-Saharan Africa and other parts of the world have developed, and how we have come to understand those relationships through the process of writing history. The course is taught as an introduction to post-colonial theory, so we will also be reading the work of influential theorists from other parts of the world.

Some of the writers we will read include Steve Biko, Ngugi wa Thiong'o, Edward Said, Leopold Senghor, Walter Rodney, Frantz Fanon, Amilcar Cabral, and others.

We will also watch 2-3 documentary films and read two short novels: Tsitsi Dangarembga's "Nervous Conditions" and "Waiting for the Barbarians" by J.M. Coatzee

Student learning goals

1. To develop critical and comparative historical and analytic skills.

2. To gain a basic understanding of post-colonial theory.

General method of instruction

This course will consist of short lectures, documentary films and small & large group discussion of assigned texts.

Recommended preparation

Class assignments and grading

Assignments include a midterm, two short response papers and co-leading one class discussion.


The information above is intended to be helpful in choosing courses. Because the instructor may further develop his/her plans for this course, its characteristics are subject to change without notice. In most cases, the official course syllabus will be distributed on the first day of class.
Last Update by Georgia M. Roberts
Date: 12/17/2011