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Instructor Class Description

Time Schedule:

Robert Farkasch
BIS 324
Bothell Campus

International Political Economy

The study of interrelations between international politics and economics. Addresses the Bretton Woods institutions, differing political conceptions of international economic relations, trade, trade restrictions, trade agreements, global financial flows, migration, and exchange rates. Methods emphasize institutional analysis, historical analysis, accounting frameworks, and formal economic models.

Class description

This course provides an integrated approach to understanding some of the basic themes of the international political economy (IPE). A multi disciplinary perspective encompassing insights from the modern disciplines of history, sociology, politics and economics will be called upon to better understand and explain the process of globalization. The tension between market pressures to disperse or concentrate various forms of economic activity and state efforts to enhance or resist those pressures is a theme that will run throughout. Whether markets are embedded within or autonomous from political institutions depends on the theoretical perspective employed. An introduction to the economic liberal, realist, and Marxist/alternative perspectives will provide an overview of the underlying issues and competing ideologies that shape the global political economy.

Student learning goals

General method of instruction

Lecture.

Recommended preparation

None.

Class assignments and grading

Midterm, final, and a critical book review.

Written assignments and participation.


The information above is intended to be helpful in choosing courses. Because the instructor may further develop his/her plans for this course, its characteristics are subject to change without notice. In most cases, the official course syllabus will be distributed on the first day of class.
Last Update by Robert Farkasch
Date: 04/13/2007