Center for Teaching and Learning

2018 Faculty Fellows schedule

Quick links:

Wednesday, September 5

9:00-9:30

Check in: Packet pick-up and registration
Location: Johnson Lobby

 9:45-10:20

Welcome

Location: Johnson 102

Beth Kalikoff, Director, Center for Teaching and Learning; Associate Professor of Writing Studies

10:20-10:30

Break

10:30-11:45

Plenary: Why We Do What We Do

Location: Johnson 102

Colleen Craig, Chemistry
Megan Francis, Political Science
Bill Kunz, Communication, UW Tacoma

Teaching scholars from two UW campuses talk about why they do the kind of work they do and why that matters.

12:00-1:20

University Libraries Lunch

Location: Suzzallo-Allen Libraries Commons

1:30-2:45

CONCURRENT SESSIONS:

Getting off to a Good Start 

Location: Mary Gates 241

Moon-Ho Jung, History
Mehran Mesbahi, Aeronautics and Astronautics

How might you design your course syllabus, online resources and plan your first class meeting to set clear expectations, establish ground rules, and create a climate conducive to learning?

How can you find more information about your students and your particular classroom before the first day?

We will address these questions (and others) to help you get off to a great start.


Mentoring and Working With Graduate and Undergraduate Students

Location: Mary Gates 231

Alexes Harris, Sociology
Heather D. Hill, Evans School of Public Policy and Governance

Students play a critical role in research and teaching at the UW and they look to faculty to advise them in and outside of the classroom. Among the topics we will discuss are:

  • How to establish a strong mentoring relationship in research, including co-authoring papers;
  • How to help graduate students lead classroom discussions and work effectively with undergraduates; and
  • How to respond to (or avoid) potential conflicts and grievances.

Practices That Support Your Teaching

Location: Mary Gates 251

Charlotte P. Lee, Human Centered Design and Engineering
Chantel Prat, Psychology

This session covers strategies for improving your productivity, effectiveness, and well-being. We offer practical tips (e.g., providing focused feedback on student work, rather than writing all over their every assignment) — and discuss issues that are notoriously challenging for faculty (e.g., not spending every waking moment on preparing for class).

We also present characteristics of new faculty members that researcher Robert Boice calls “quick starters,” those who develop strong research and teaching records relatively early in their careers.

2:45-3:00 Break

3:00-4:15

CONCURRENT SESSIONS:

Getting Off to a Good Start

Location: Mary Gates 241

Moon-Ho Jung, History
Mehran Mesbahi, Aeronautics and Astronautics

How might you design your course syllabus, online resources and plan your first class meeting to set clear expectations, establish ground rules, and create a climate conducive to learning?

How can you find more information about your students and your particular classroom before the first day?

We will address these questions (and others) to help you get off to a great start.


Mentoring and Working With Graduate and Undergraduate Students

Location: Mary Gates 231

Alexes Harris, Sociology
Heather D. Hill, Evans School of Public Policy and Governance

Students play a critical role in research and teaching at the UW and they look to faculty to advise them in and outside of the classroom. Among the topics we will discuss are:

  • How to establish a strong mentoring relationship in research, including co-authoring papers;
  • How to help graduate students lead classroom discussions and work effectively with undergraduates; and
  • How to respond to (or avoid) potential conflicts and grievances.

Practices That Support Your Teaching

Location: Mary Gates 251

Charlotte P. Lee, Human Centered Design and Engineering
Chantel Prat, Psychology

This session covers strategies for improving your productivity, effectiveness, and well-being. We offer practical tips (e.g., providing focused feedback on student work, rather than writing all over their every assignment) — and discuss issues that are notoriously challenging for faculty (e.g., not spending every waking moment on preparing for class).

We also present characteristics of new faculty members that researcher Robert Boice calls “quick starters,” those who develop strong research and teaching records relatively early in their careers.

Preparation for the Teaching Reflection on Sept. 6 Before you end your day, we ask that you review the Teaching Reflections Participant Instructions and Worksheet for details on how to prepare for your Teaching Reflection session.

It is important that your phone or laptop be ready prior to your session to maximize the time and opportunity to have an engaging group discussion. We encourage you to record a short video and upload to confirm the proper steps. Please delete any test videos.

 

Thursday, September 6

9:00-11:45

Teaching Reflections

Location: Please refer to the *pink* sheet in your packet for your room number.

Watching colleagues teach can bring a fresh perspective to our own classroom approaches. This session offers a multi-disciplinary peer mentoring experience where seasoned and newer instructors learn from one another and serve as teaching resources.

Each participant shares a brief (3-4 minute) lesson presentation on a concept from one of their courses. The lessons are recorded, and after everyone has presented, the videos are played back for participants to reflect on and discuss. What worked well? What might you do differently? Participants’ contributions make this an enriching opportunity to reflect on how our teaching embodies our learning goals.

Come prepared to share a 3-4 minute lesson and some responses to the following:

  1. What are your lesson objectives?
  2. What goals do you have for student learning?
  3. Are there particular aspects of your presentation on which you would like feedback?
12:00-1:00 Lunch: Pick up in Mary Gates Commons

1:15-2:30

CONCURRENT SESSIONS:

Evidence-Based Best Practices for Student Learning and Engagement

Location: Mary Gates 234

Ian Schnee, Philosophy
Kristi Straus, Program on the Environment

President Ana Mari Cauce refers to the UW as a T1, meaning an R1 university where stellar, evidence-based teaching takes place. This session draws on the scholarship of teaching and learning, and on discipline-based educational research to discuss practices that lead to increased student engagement and achievement.


Why “Diversity” and “Inclusion” Are Not Enough

Location: Mary Gates 228

Megan Francis, Political Science
Moon-Ho Jung, History

Almost every college campus in the United States, including the UW, has come to embrace and promote “diversity” and “inclusion.” We will interrogate the critical limits of that discourse and explore other ways to frame power and justice, within and beyond the classroom. How might we address and approach racial, gender, and sexual differences to make the university a generative site of political and social transformation?


Equity in Online and Classroom Learning

Location: Mary Gates 238

Erin Hill, School of Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics
Christine Stevens, Nursing and Healthcare Leadership Program

In 2018, undergraduates are likely to be first-generation students who may work full-time and go to school part-time. They may live off-campus or out of town. Some take a quarter or two off, take care of children or parents. UW undergraduates include international/multilingual students, veterans, LGBTQ+, people of color, as well as other identities and backgrounds, some not visible.

How do you create online, hybrid, and in-person learning environments that promote equity and access? In this workshop, we will discuss evidence-based practices that support all students.

2:30-2:45 Break
2:45-4:00 CONCURRENT SESSIONS:

Evidence-Based Best Practices for Student Learning and Engagement

Location: Mary Gates 234

Ian Schnee, Philosophy
Kristi Straus, Program on the Environment

President Ana Mari Cauce refers to the UW as a T1, meaning an R1 university where stellar, evidence-based teaching takes place. This session draws on the scholarship of teaching and learning, and on discipline-based educational research to discuss practices that lead to increased student engagement and achievement.


Why “Diversity” and “Inclusion” Are Not Enough

Location: Mary Gates 228

Megan Francis, Political Science
Moon-Ho Jung, History

Almost every college campus in the United States, including the UW, has come to embrace and promote “diversity” and “inclusion.” We will interrogate the critical limits of that discourse and explore other ways to frame power and justice, within and beyond the classroom. How might we address and approach racial, gender, and sexual differences to make the university a generative site of political and social transformation?


Equity in Online and Classroom Learning

Location: Mary Gates 238

Erin Hill, School of Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics
Christine Stevens, Nursing and Healthcare Leadership Program

In 2018, undergraduates are likely to be first-generation students who may work full-time and go to school part-time. They may live off-campus or out of town. Some take a quarter or two off, take care of children or parents. UW undergraduates include international/multilingual students, veterans, LGBTQ+, people of color, as well as other identities and backgrounds, some not visible.

How do you create online, hybrid, and in-person learning environments that promote equity and access? In this workshop, we will discuss evidence-based practices that support all students.

4:00-5:30

Social Hour at the Center for Teaching and Learning
Location:
Gerberding 100 (Building auto-locks at 5:00PM)

 

Friday, September 7

9:00-10:15 Getting to Know UW students

Location: Mary Gates 241

This session welcomes student panelist who will share their experiences with faculty both inside and outside of the classroom.  The panelists discuss topics and questions provided by new faculty  on the first day of the program.

Moderator: Elba Moise, Education Learning Sciences and Human Development

Myrella Gonzalez, American Ethnic Studies; Education
Marcus Johnson, Communication
Emma Tibbits, International Studies; Asian Languages and Literature
Jeffrey Wu, Communication; minors in English and Diversity

10:15-10:25 Break
10:25-11:30 Faculty Perspectives

Location: Mary Gates 241

What can you expect as a new UW faculty member? Hear from recently hired and promoted UW faculty members about their teaching and research experiences at UW. The panel will share 1 or 2 pieces of advice for new faculty and answer the questions you provided on September 5 via Poll Everywhere.

Moderator: Erin Hill, School of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics

Corie Cobb, Mechanical Engineering
Jane Lee, Social Work
James Lin, International Studies
Cricket Keating, Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies

 11:40-12:50 Lunch with UW Learning Technologies
Location:
Odegaard 220
1:00-2:15 CONCURRENT SESSIONS:

Active Learning in Large Lecture

Location: Mary Gates 231

Lisa Coutu, Communication
Colleen Craig, Chemistry

Incorporating active learning strategies in courses with 100, 200, and even 400 students can be challenging. This session invites instructors to consider ways to increase student engagement and faculty efficiency while focusing on student learning goals.


Everyone is Talking About Teaching as if New Faculty Members Have Nothing Else To Do

Location: Mary Gates 241

David Domke, Communication
Sarah Keller, Chemistry

The Faculty Fellows Program introduces participants to teaching at the UW and to resources that support teaching. But how do you carve out time to do your research and creative work (which may include writing grant proposals)? This session identifies efficiencies and resources that allow faculty members in all fields to excel in their scholarship while teaching effectively.


Forming and Managing Group Work

Location: Mary Gates 251

Erin Hill, School of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics

This session explores specific strategies that we might use to generate effective, in-class group work. Participants will work together to explore ideas, activities, challenges, and questions while experiencing an example of group work management.

2:15-2:30 Break
2:30-3:45 CONCURRENT SESSIONS:

Career Trajectories: Tenure-Track and Tenured

Location: Mary Gates 241

Robert Stacey, Dean, College of Arts and Sciences
Zelda Zabinsky, Professor, Industrial and Systems Engineering

This session focuses on professional campus-wide policy around tenure and promotion while offering information about policy and practice within the College of Arts and Sciences and the College of Engineering. While the session doesn’t “cover” every UW department or college, it previews conversations and questions at the department level, answers questions, and refers participants to relevant resources.


Career Trajectories: Promotion-Eligible and Promoted Lecturers

Location: Mary Gates 251

Matt McGarrity, Communication
Mary Pat Wenderoth, Biology

This session focuses on career development for promotion-eligible lecturers, including campus-wide policy and practices for review and promotion. While the session doesn’t “cover” every UW department or college, it previews conversations and questions at the department level, answers questions, and refers participants to relevant resources.

 3:45-4:30

What’s Next and Wrap Up With Senior Fellows

Location: Mary Gates 241

Beth Kalikoff, Center for Teaching and Learning