Search | Directories | Reference Tools
UW Home > Discover UW > Student Guide > Course Catalog 

Instructor Class Description

Time Schedule:

John R. Skalski
Q SCI 480
Seattle Campus

Sampling Theory for Biologists

Theory and applications of sampling finite populations including: simple random sampling, stratified random sampling, ratio estimates, regression estimates, systematic sampling, cluster sampling, sample size determinations, applications in fisheries and forestry. Other topics include sampling plant and animal populations, sampling distributions, estimation of parameters and statistical treatment of data. Prerequisite: Q SCI 482; recommended: Q SCI 483. Offered: jointly with STAT 480; W, odd years.

Class description

Theory and applications of sampling finite populations including: simple random sampling stratified random sampling, ratio estimates, regression estimates, systematic sampling, cluster sampling, sample size determinations, applications in fisheries and forestry. Other topics include sampling for hot spots, rotational or panel designs, and line-transect sampling.

Student learning goals

Basic finite sampling theory with special applications to environmental and ecological scenarios

Meaning of sampling precision and sample size calculations

Relationships between finite populations, sampling frames, and statistical inferences

Relationship between how a sample size is drawn, estimators, and their variance calculations

General method of instruction

Two 1.5-hour lectures per week, weekly assignments, and daily readings. Two alternative textbooks.

Recommended preparation

Working knowledge of statistical methods and inferences, as taught in QSCI 482, essential.

Class assignments and grading

Nine weekly homework assignments analyzing ecological data and/or structuring sample surveys. Final project involves designing, conducting, analyzing, and reporting of a finite survey conducted by the student.

Grade based on total numerical score from nine weekly homework assignments (450 points) and final course project (150 points).


The information above is intended to be helpful in choosing courses. Because the instructor may further develop his/her plans for this course, its characteristics are subject to change without notice. In most cases, the official course syllabus will be distributed on the first day of class.
Last Update by John R. Skalski
Date: 11/03/2011