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Instructor Class Description

Time Schedule:

Jonathan Aloisi
JSIS B 431
Seattle Campus

International Negotiation Simulation

Research and writing in small groups to prepare policy documents on a current international issue, followed by simulated negotiations with students representing different nations, following instructions from and reporting to national leaders.

Class description

The Negotiation Course is a structured role play that requires students to work together in groups as they engage in research, undertake simulated negotiations, and draft “real time” policy documents and assessments. The instructors, retired U.S. senior diplomats, use a real world scenario–the Six-Party Talks on denuclearization of North Korea–to provide instructional context. Students meet formally with the instructors twice each week, but much of the educational value comes from informal student-to-student interactions (negotiations) outside regular class hours. Minimal required reading, but students must research national policies and positions related to the negotiation and regularly engage their student counterparts and instructors face-to-face, by e-mail, and via formal written documents. No prior knowledge of nuclear nonproliferation, arms control, or NE Asian security issues is required, but this course is best suited for upper-class undergraduates and graduate students with significant prior preparation in international relations. The degree and quality of active participation is the most important factor in determining each student’s grade. Participation is essential; absences can lower a student’s final grade. Student interest, initiative, judgment, leadership, and communication skills are monitored closely, through written reports and direct observation, on a continuous basis. CORE,FO,EA

Student learning goals

General method of instruction

Recommended preparation

No prior knowledge of nuclear nonproliferation, arms control, or NE Asian security issues is required, but this course is best suited for upper-class undergraduates and graduate students with significant prior preparation in international relations

Class assignments and grading

The degree and quality of active participation is the most important factor in determining each student’s grade. Participation is essential; absences can lower a student’s final grade.


The information above is intended to be helpful in choosing courses. Because the instructor may further develop his/her plans for this course, its characteristics are subject to change without notice. In most cases, the official course syllabus will be distributed on the first day of class.
Last Update by Laura R. Dobrovolny
Date: 11/14/2013