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Instructor Class Description

Time Schedule:

Sunila S. Kale
SIS 590
Seattle Campus

Special Topics

Seminar. Course content varies. Offered occasionally by visiting or resident faculty.

Class description

Comparative International Political Economy of Development

In this class on the comparative political economy of development, we focus the bulk of our empirical and theoretical attention on the challenges of “late development,” as distinct from the earlier experiences of Western Europe and the US. The course is divided into two major sections. We begin by critically engaging the term “development,” exploring what kinds of assumptions are embedded in the dominant teleologies of political and economic change. In the remainder of the weeks we will read about and discuss economic change through a common political economy framework that hinges on the tripartite relationships of state, market, and society. We consider a range of arguments for the emergence and absence of development, including theories that focus on social structure, institutions such as property rights, natural resources, political and economic geography, state-society relations, and historical legacies.

Student learning goals

critically evaluate different definitions and theories of development

compare different models of development in Asia, Africa, and Latin America

General method of instruction

seminar format; student participation required

Recommended preparation

Class assignments and grading

weekly reaction papers; two short papers; lead discussion once

participation (25%); leading discussion (25%); two essays (50%)


The information above is intended to be helpful in choosing courses. Because the instructor may further develop his/her plans for this course, its characteristics are subject to change without notice. In most cases, the official course syllabus will be distributed on the first day of class.
Last Update by M Jane Meyerding
Date: 01/28/2009